Archive for University

Push to Walk Partners with Seton Hall University for Study


Riverdale, NJ (PRWEB) May 28, 2015

Throughout the past few months, Push to Walk has acted as a study site for research comparing the validity and reliability of the Shaw Gait Assessment in comparison to the GaitRite. Dr. Preeti Nair, P.T., Ph.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at Seton Hall University is the principle investigator for the study.

The Shaw Gait Assessment is a free online tool, where the GaitRite is a $ 30,000 piece of equipment. The GaitRite is considered the gold standard in providing information about how someone walks. It can collect data on walking speed, distance, and time between steps. The Shaw Gait Assessment has been shown to provide comparable data to the GaitRite for populations who have suffered stroke or been diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, but to date, no information has been gathered about the reliability of the Shaw Gait Assessment for incomplete spinal cord injury.

This is the first time Push to Walk has collaborated with a university to conduct research at its facility. Once the data is analyzed, Dr. Nair hopes that she can publish the results as a poster to be presented at various conferences. “It is a great opportunity for Push to Walk to partner with an institution such as Seton Hall. Our top priority has always been providing high quality exercise to optimize the health and quality of life of our clients. With this research collaboration, we also wish to show that we are capable of making a bigger contribution to the science behind exercise and neuro-rehabilitation. In doing so, we hope to find even better ways of benefitting our clients and other people living with paralysis. We are lucky to have a researcher like Dr. Nair and Seton Hall University willing to help and guide us on this mission,” says Push to Walk Program Director, Tommy Sutor. If the results of the study are positive, it will show that places like Push to Walk, who normally couldn’t afford expensive pieces of equipment like the GaitRite, can still gather useful and meaningful data about changes in their clients’ abilities using the Shaw Gait Assessment.

Donation opportunities are available on the Push to Walk website: http://www.pushtowalknj.org. For more information, please contact Stephanie Lajam at (862) 200-5848 or slajam(at)pushtowalknj(dot)org.

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About Push to Walk

Founded in 2007, Push to Walk is an organization that provides individualized workouts and resources to people with spinal cord injuries and other forms of paralysis to optimize current quality of life and to prepare for future medical advancements. It is the only program of its kind in the New York- New Jersey area. Push to Walk’s rigorous one-on-one workout approach challenges clients to reach their personal goals and achieve maximum independence, leading to greater success and fulfillment in their personal and professional lives. Push to Walk is only able to cover about 65% of its operating costs through client fees, and relies on grants and fundraising events to help make up the difference. A 501(C)3 non-profit, Push to Walk is located in Riverdale, New Jersey. Visit http://www.pushtowalknj.org to learn more.







University of St. Augustine Continuing Education Program Reaccredited

San Marcos, California (PRWEB) May 08, 2015

The Continuing Professional Education program at the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences has been reaccredited for five years by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET). IACET sets the standard for excellence in continuing education with its rigorous reaccreditation process.

The University of St. Augustine offers more than 100 specialty certifications, in-person seminars nationwide and pre-recorded webinars for physical therapists, occupational therapists, athletic trainers, physical therapy assistants, occupational therapy assistants and other healthcare providers. Attendees can earn continuing education units (CEUs) they may be able to apply toward the licensure requirements in their profession.

For a full listing of seminars, visit cpe.usa.edu.

The University of St. Augustine’s Continuing Professional Education program has several new offerings:

Animal-Assisted Therapy: Improving Treatment Outcomes, which covers the use of a goal-directed treatment with an animal used as a key part of the process. This in-person seminar explores the history, theory and research outcomes related to animal-assisted therapy, and the use of dogs as therapeutic tools. Watch a video about the seminar at https://youtu.be/3cdevOCJluc.

Exercise Strategies and Progression for Musculoskeletal Dysfunction, which shares exercise strategies for conditions that affect the spine and limbs and are commonly encountered in an outpatient orthopaedic clinic. The exercise interventions are grounded in current research and immediately applicable to participants’ work in the clinic.

“We work to ensure that our continuing education program includes topics that are relevant to people who work in physical and occupational therapy professions, with the assurance of high standards and learning formats that meet the needs of all types of learners,” said Lori Hankins, director of continuing professional education. “Our IACET reaccreditation gives us that gold seal of approval that many professionals look for.”

About Us

The University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences (USA) is a graduate institution that emphasizes health science education through innovative quality classroom and distance education. Founded in 1979, USA has locations in San Marcos, California; St. Augustine, Florida; and Austin, Texas. USA offers degree programs in physical therapy, occupational therapy, athletic training, education and health science, as well as residency, fellowship and continuing education programs. For more information, visit http://www.usa.edu. USA is a member of Laureate International Universities, a network of more than 80 institutions in 29 countries and one of the most significant global higher education providers for health sciences. For more information, visit http://www.laureate.net.







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Okayama University research: Enzyme-inhibitors treat drug-resistant epilepsy


Okayama, Japan (PRWEB UK) 27 April 2015

One percent of the world’s population suffer from epilepsy, and a third of sufferers cannot be treated with antiepileptic drugs. Diet control has been used to treat patients suffering from drug-resistant epilepsy since the 1920s, but how metabolic processes affect epilepsy has not been fully understood. Now researchers at Okayama University and Kawasaki Medical School have identified the metabolic pathways altered by diet treatments, the enzymes that can control them and potential metabolic drugs that may be effective for treating types of epilepsy that are resistant to other drugs.

‘Ketogenic’ diets used to treat epilepsy are high in fat and low in carbohydrate. Due to the scarcity of glucose available as a result, the brain metabolises ketones, which uses a different metabolic pathway.

Tsuyoshi Inoue and his team examined neural cells in an artificial cerebrospinal fluid solution switched from glucose to ketones. When glucose was switched to ketones the cells became hyperpolarized – a change in the cell’s membrane potential that makes neurons less prone to becoming excited and active.

The researchers further broke down the processes in the metabolism of glucose and identified a crucial enzyme – lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Blocking LDH mimicked the switch from glucose to ketones in vitro. Further in vivo tests on mice confirmed the effect.

By testing the drugs already in use they identified LDH inhibitory action in stiripentol, a drug used for a rare form of the epilepsy. By modifying its chemical structure, they found an alternative LDH inhibitor with a similar structure that was more effective for in vivo tests on mice. They conclude, “Our study opens a realistic path to develop compounds for drug-resistant epilepsy by targeting LDH enzymes with stiripentol derivatives.”

Background

Epilepsy

Epilepsy describes the neurological disorder that results in seizures that have no other known cause. The seizures result from excessive excitation in the cortical nerve in the brain and the length and severity of the seizures may vary.

The transmission of signals by neurons relies on the rapid rise and fall of the membrane potential, and is affected by cell polarization. When the cell membrane becomes hyperpolarized, a greater stimulus is required to produce an action potential. As a result hyperpolarization can prevent the excessive cortical activity that causes epileptic seizures.

Glucose and ketone metabolic pathways

Ketones directly activate the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle that generates energy in aerobic respiration. In contrast glucose and lactate are converted to pyruvate in glycolysis, which are then used as the main input and intermediates of the TCA cycle.

The researchers studied the activity of neural cells from the basal ganglia – a region of the brain that is important for the propagation of seizures – in artificial cerebrospinal fluid in vitro. They found that the replacement of glucose with ketones led to hyperpolarization of the cell membrane. The hyperpolarization was recovered by the addition of lactate, suggesting that inhibitors of the enzyme LDH – which catalyses the conversion of lactate into pyruvate – may have the same effect on epilepsy as ketogenic diets.

Stiripentol and analog

Stiripentol is an antiepileptic drug found to be effective for a particular type of epilepsy, Dravet syndrome. The chemical structure of stiripentol differs to most antiepileptic drugs, prompting the researchers to explore other chemicals with a similar structure that have LDH inhibiting and antiepileptic actions.

Isosafrole has a similar structure to stiripentol but with certain parts of the chemical structure absent (i.e. the hydroxyl and tertiary-butyl groups). The researchers found that isosafrole strongly inhibited LDH and suppressed signs of seizure such as spontaneous high voltage spikes and paroxysmal discharges in mice tests. The results suggest that LDH inhibitors may be effective for types of epilepsy that cannot be treated with traditional drugs.

Reference

Nagisa Sada, Suni Lee, Takashi Katsu, Takemi Otsuki, Tsuyoshi Inoue. Targeting LDH Enzymes with a Stiripentol Analog to Treat Epilepsy. Science (March 20, 2015) Vol. 347 no. 6228 pp. 1362-1367

DOI: 10.1126/science.aaa1299

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25792327

<Archive of Okayama University Research Updates>

Vol.1:Innovative non-invasive ‘liquid biopsy’ method to capture circulating tumor cells from blood samples for genetic testing

Vol.2:Ensuring a cool recovery from cardiac arrest

Vol.3:Organ regeneration research leaps forward

Vol.4:Cardiac mechanosensitive integrator

Vol.5:Cell injections get to the heart of congenital defects

Vol.6:Fourth key molecule identified in bone development

Vol.7:Anticancer virus solution provides an alternative to surgery

Vol.8:Light-responsive dye stimulates sight in genetically blind patients

Vol.9:Studies reveal how a diabetes drug helps towards the rejection of tumours by supporting immune cells

http://www.okayama-u.ac.jp/en/tp/release/release_id282.html

Further information

Okayama University

1-1-1 Tsushima-naka , Kita-ku , Okayama 700-8530, Japan

Planning and Public Information Division, Okayama University

E-mail: www-adm@adm.okayama-u.ac.jp

Website: http://www.okayama-u.ac.jp/index_e.html

Okayama Univ. e-Bulletin: http://www.okayama-u.ac.jp/user/kouhou/ebulletin/

About Okayama University (You Tube):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDL1coqPRYI

About Okayama University

Okayama University is one of the largest comprehensive universities in Japan with roots going back to the Medical Education House sponsored by the Lord of Okayama and established in 1870. Now with 1,300 faculty and 14,000 students, the University offers courses in specialties ranging from medicine and pharmacy to humanities and physical sciences. Okayama University is located in the heart of Japan approximately 3 hours west of Tokyo by Shinkansen.







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State of Colorado Employee Wellness Program Teams Up With the University of Colorado Anschutz Health and Wellness Center to Bring Health Solutions to State Workers


Denver, Colo. (PRWEB) March 18, 2015

The first group of 20 State of Colorado (State) employees lost an average of 8.59% of their body weight while participating in the 16 week State of Slim pilot program, offered through the employee wellness program. Overall the group of lost 282.1 pounds, with some of the individuals losing as many as 34 pounds.

The University of Colorado (CU) Anschutz Health and Wellness Center’s research-based, results-oriented weight-loss program State of Slim, was offered through the State of Colorado Employee Wellness Program, which encourages State employees to live healthier lives through incentives and innovative programs. The wellness program empowers employees to take action by creating long-term healthy behaviors and routines, and supports Gov. John Hickenlooper’s goal to make Colorado the healthiest state in America.

All interested employees completed a voluntary application and signed a commitment to the State of Slim expectations. CU Anschutz Health and Wellness Center experts selected 20 employees for the program based on the center’s criteria and participants’ level of readiness.

The employees met with a State of Slim transformation coach for 16 weeks of curriculum-based, face-to-face group sessions. To promote engagement, employees paid a small fee, and if employees met the expectations and promises for the program they earned their contribution back.

In terms of weight loss, the program teaches employees how to get outside their comfort zone and have the right mindset and motivation to transform themselves. Unlike typical weight loss programs, State of Slim teaches participants not only how to get the weight off, but how to keep it off.

“State of Slim class participants often come to us for weight loss but soon learn they are in for a lifelong transformation,” said program creator Holly Wyatt, MD, medical director of the CU Anschutz Health and Wellness Center and co-author of the book State of Slim. “The information we teach is based on 30 years of scientific research, which showed us that changing your mindset is just as important as diet and fitness when it comes to taking weight off and keeping it off long-term. We are thrilled to partner with the State of Colorado in its organizational wellness journey as it offers the State of Slim program to its employees. It truly demonstrates the State’s commitment to walking the talk and the importance of a healthy workplace.”

Department of Personnel & Administration (DPA) employee Greg Mechem lost 20.6 pounds by changing eating behaviors, habits and patterns. “I love the way this whole concept has been introduced,” said Mechem. “The explanations of how we’ve gotten to where we are ring true. The insight as to what needs to be done to change the cycle and that this is not just a temporary change but a permanent one, is profound.”

Another DPA employee, Sabrina D’Agosta, dropped 18.2 pounds she had previously struggled to lose. “As a lifelong vegetarian, I thought I was eating really well, and exercise alone wasn’t helping me accomplish my weight loss goals after I had kids. State of Slim made me re-examine my food choices and fundamentally changed the way I think about not just my diet, but my overall health and well-being. I’m thrilled with how much I lost, how quickly I lost it and how confident I am that I can keep it off. I’m hugely appreciative that the State offered this program and hope that many others will participate.”

Moving forward, the State plans to offer additional State of Slim programs to select departments in a phased approach. One of the State’s health plan partners, UnitedHealthcare, sponsored the cost of the first phase of the program.

“State of Slim is an innovative and exciting way to get State employees to make healthy choices a part of their everyday life,” said Beth Soberg, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Colorado. “UnitedHealthcare is grateful for the opportunity to support this program and help Coloradoans live healthier lives.”

“As we continue to advance the employee wellness program, we are always looking for opportunities to collaborate with local partners who offer wellness solutions that not only engage State employees in their health, but help them make positive lifelong changes,” said Nate Sassano, wellness manager for the State. “The CU Anschutz Health and Wellness Center’s State of Slim program brings training and education on-site and supports our vision to build a work environment where it is easy to engage in healthy activities.”

State of Colorado Employee Wellness Program:

In 2012, the Governor’s Office released the State of Health Report: Colorado’s Mission to become the Healthiest state in the Country. The plan outlined ways to support Coloradans in their efforts to achieve their optimal health, promote prevention and care management, expand coverage, and improve health system integration and quality. As the second largest employer in Colorado, the State recognized the opportunity to improve the health of more than 31,000 classified State employees and lead the way as a wellness-focused employer. The State of Colorado Employee Wellness Program was launched on July 1, 2013. The goal is to create a worksite environment that inspires, encourages and supports employee health and well-being through programs, policies and culture. The program is offered to all State of Colorado employees. Employees on a State-sponsored benefit plan are eligible to receive up to $ 20 off of their monthly benefits premium if they 1) take an annual health assessment through their carrier and 2) earn 400 coins monthly on CaféWell, an online Health Optimization Platform™ of resources and programs that drives consumer engagement through a novel combination of social, gaming and personalized activities. For more information on the employee wellness program, visit colorado.gov/dhr/wellness.

State of Slim:

The State of Slim program was created by Holly Wyatt, MD, medical director at the University of Colorado Anschutz Health and Wellness Center and medical director for the ABC-TV hit show “Extreme Weight Loss”. Wyatt’s revolutionary 16-week transformational weight loss program is based on the book State of Slim she co-authored with CU Anschutz Health and Wellness Center Executive Director James O. Hill, PhD. The CU Anschutz Health and Wellness Center is now offering a corporate version of the State of Slim program to employers dedicated to improving the well-being of their employees. State of Slim is unlike traditional weight loss programs, transforming lives and empowering employees through behavior-change and sustainable health solutions.

University of Colorado Anschutz Health and Wellness Center:

The University of Colorado Anschutz Health and Wellness Center is an innovative, state-of-the art research, education and consumer care facility located on the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, Colorado. The Center’s mission is to transform the lives of individuals and communities through science-based wellness strategies. Research is translated into customized programs and offerings, delivered through the Wellness Clinic and Fitness Center.







Scholarly Gateway of Asia: Japans Ritsumeikan University to open innovative Osaka-Ibaraki Campus in April 2015


Kyoto, Japan (PRWEB UK) 17 March 2015

Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, one of Japan’s top private academic and research institutes, announces the opening of its Osaka-Ibaraki Campus in April 2015. The RU Osaka-Ibaraki Campus will be a ‘Gateway of Asia’ for academic excellence and innovative research.

Ritsumeikan University (RU), Kyoto, announces the opening of its Osaka-Ibaraki Campus in April 2015. The Campus was designed to be a hub in Asia for education and research in a unique campus-environment specially designed to promote interaction between students, academic staff, entrepreneurs and industrialists, and residents of Ibaraki and surrounding areas.

The Campus is 99,000 square meters and in April 2015 will be home to approximately 6000 students. In 2015 undergraduates will be able to take courses at the College of Business Administration and College of Policy Science and in 2016 courses will be offered at the College of Psychology.

The graduate schools are Graduate School of Business Administration, Graduate School of Policy Science, Graduate School of Technology Management, and Graduate School of Management.

The Ritsumeikan University Osaka-Ibaraki Campus is located in close proximity to major railway stations in the Kansai region of Japan being about 20 minutes from Kyoto, 10 minutes from Osaka, and 60 minutes from Nara.

RU statistics for research funding

1. RU was ranked 3rd for the amount of research funding (1.1 billion Yen) from Grants in Aid for Scientific Research from MEXT in 2014 for private universities.

2. In the same year, RU was ranked 4th in the actual number of grants selected (490) for Grants in Aid for Scientific Research.

3. Over the past five years, RU was 1st in the number of grants selected in the disciplines of Human Geography, Business Management, and Sociology.

4. RU was number one amongst private universities for commissioned research (2.3 billion Yen and 235 commissions) from private industries in 2013.

5. In October 2013 RU was the only private university to be selected out of 190 applications for two trial research bases of the prestigious MEXT ‘Center for Innovation Program (COI STREAM). Although the funding of the trial research base, ‘Developing a Regional Model for “Slow and Local” Innovation in Food and Agricultural Industries” will come to an end at the end of March but an upgraded version of the trial base “Health Innovation to Promote Exercise in Life” (the new name of the project: “Bright Future for All Ages with Health Innovation by Daily Exercise”) will be an on-going project. The funding for the latter base is currently at 19,500,000 Yen.

Unique features of the Ritsumeikan University Osaka-Ibaraki Campus

1. The design of the campus and approaches to education and research are based on the three concepts of ‘Gateway to Asia’, ‘Urban Co-Creation’, and ‘Regional and Social Collaboration’. The Campus will act as a hub in Asia for international networking and collaborative research.

2. The Campus will house the ‘Ritsumeikan Global Asia Research Organization’ and ‘Ritsumeikan Asia Japan Research Institute’ as part of RU’s plans to establish the Osaka-Ibaraki Campus as a center for RU to conduct research in Asia.

3. Courses such as the “Asia China Business Program” offered by the College of Business Administration will focus on a deeper understanding of issues in management, commerce, and policy making in Asia.

4. For the first time in Japan, the ‘Ibaraki Chamber of Commerce and Industry’ is located inside the RU Osaka-Ibaraki Campus.

5. The whole of the Campus is one mammoth learning space with the ‘Commons’ providing not only private study rooms but also multi-functional open space along the 200m by 18 m concourse, accessible to students, staff, affiliated industrial partners, and members of the local community. .

6. A library with 800,000 books and seats for 1100 people, and a ‘garden library’ on the roof with a lawn and tables.

7. The lecture rooms have glass walls for ‘visible teaching’ and the chairs and tables can be re-arranged to suit the needs of teachers and students.

8. A 1000 seat concert hall for ceremonies and musical events that is open to the members of the local community.

9. The ‘Camping Kitchen’ restaurant with international food for lunch between studies and a special a la carte menu for dinner.

Further information

YouTube video of Ritsumeikan University Osaka-Ibaraki Campus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0F250KKTpk&feature=player_embedded

YouTube video of Tabata Protocol

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8c8alBX7Zro&list=PLjORaP_c5ZY2O_fLzhdsQHqHwxVMfsmWr

Enquires about enrollment on courses, research, industrial collaboration, and careers contact:

Kevin Hsien (Mr.)

Ritsumeikan University, Office of Public Relations

EMAIL: pr-web@st.ritsumei.ac.jp

Telephone: 075-813-8146

Postal Address: 1 Nishinokyo-Suzaku-cho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8520 JAPAN

About Ritsumeikan University

Ritsumeikan University is one of Japan’s foremost private academic institutes for education and research with roots going back to Prince Saionji’s private academy of the same name, established in 1869. It was officially founded in 1900 by his protege, Kojuro Nakagawa, as the Kyoto Hosei Gakko (Kyoto School of Law and Politics), later to take on the name “Ritsumeikan”. The name is derived from a passage in the Jinxin chapter of the Discourses of Mencius, and means “a place to establish one’s destiny through cultivating one’s mind.”

Ritsumeikan has become an integrated academy with a rich culture of individuality and international awareness accommodating a total of 49,000 students. The current Ritsumeikan Academy has campuses in Kyoto, Shiga, Hokkaido, and Oita and encompasses two universities, four high schools, four junior high schools, and one primary school. Ritsumeikan fosters the learning and development of individual talents in order to nurture just and ethical global citizens. Three out of the four Ritsumeikan high schools have been designated by MEXT as Super Science High Schools (SSH). Ritsumeikan High School and Ritsumeikan Uji High School have been selected by MEXT for the Super-Global School Program (SGH). Ritsumeikan Uji High School has been certified as an International Baccalaureate Diploma Program (IBDP) school. Ritsumeikan Moriyama High School and Junior High School has been selected by MEXT as the Super Shokuiku (dietary education) School (SSS).

In 2014, both Ritsumeikan University and Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University were selected as the designated institutions for the Top Global University Project by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). This project is established to support Japanese universities aiming to elevate comprehensive internationalization, to collaborate with preeminent universities overseas and to reform the universities toward a globalized environment. Both Ritsumeikan University and Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University were selected as Leading-Global type (Type B) where both universities look to focus on the promotion of internationalization.

For more information, please visit

http://www.ritsumei.ac.jp/eng/

Osaka-Ibaraki Campus (Ibaraki, Osaka)

The Osaka-Ibaraki Campus is expected to facilitate collaboration with industry and government institutions, promote the Ritsumeikan Academy’s activities on the frontline of social collaboration and is fully equipped with facilities which can provide an exchange space for general use. The three main concepts are “Asia’s Gateway”, “Urban Co-Creation” and “Regional Cooperation”.







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University of Westerm States hires new functional medicine doctor for clinic system


Portland, Ore (PRWEB) March 13, 2015

University of Western States (UWS), a leader in the education of health care professionals, recently added Rachel Fischer, MD, MPH to the UWS clinic system. Dr. Fischer’s background in preventive and functional medicine also earned her a role as a faculty member in the new Northwest Center for Lifestyle and Functional Medicine (NWCLFM) at UWS. In this role, she will serve as the Integrative Therapeutics distinguished professor of functional medicine, teaching functional and preventive medicine to students in the HNFM program.

Functional medicine integrates the most recent Western medical data and practices with a focus on prevention and reversing disease progression through nutrition, exercise, stress management, as well as with drugs, supplements or therapeutic diets.

“We are very excited to have Dr. Fischer join our clinic and teaching staff. Her experience as a medical doctor with a background in functional and preventive medicine not only broadens the scope of services we can provide to patients, it also aligns with the goals and visions of the university’s new Northwest Center for Lifestyle and Functional Medicine. She shares in our belief that treating disease must start with finding the root cause,” Dr. Will Evans, provost and executive vice president at University of Western States said.

Dr. Fischer obtained her medical degree from University of Utah, where she also completed two years of medical residency in internal medicine. Dr. Fischer then completed her residency and fellowship in occupational and environmental medicine at University of Washington. Additionally, she completed a Master of Science with a focus in epidemiology from University of Utah and a master of public health focused in environmental health from University of Washington. Dr. Fischer is board certified by the American Board of Preventive Medicine and is currently pursing certification by the Institute of Functional Medicine.

“While my experience and education made this position a perfect fit for me,” Dr. Fischer said, “ultimately, it was the people and their shared belief that a transformation in patient care is necessary to address the complex, chronic diseases that so significantly impact public health.”







Maharishi University of Management Ranked #4 in Top Environmental Science Universities


Fairfield, Iowa (PRWEB) March 07, 2015

EnvironmentalScience.org has released its first annual Top Environmental Science Schools rankings — and we are excited to announce that Maharishi University of Management has been ranked #4 on their list.

The rankings are based on published surveys, student data, and other school and career data collected through several sources, including The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) and National Center for Education Statistics (NCES).

“Our school has one of the higher percentages of its students who want to make a career in sustainability. That reflects very positively on the environmental awareness of the school as a whole,” says David Fisher, Chair of the Sustainable Living Department and Director of the MA program in Sustainable Living.

Maharishi University of Management is located in Fairfield, Iowa. The Sustainable Living undergraduate and Master’s programs teach students about the impact humans have on the planet through a transdisciplinary, project-based approach to higher education. Five tracks are available through the BA program:

Fundamentals of Sustainability

Renewable Energy

Agriculture and Food

Policy & Social Change

Sustainability and the Built Environment

The MA program is based around:

Deep Sustainability

Advanced Ecological Design

Cultural Competence

Holistic Community Development

Additionally, the Sustainable Living department conducts classes in a net zero energy environment that is student managed.

Founded in 1971, Maharishi University of Management (MUM) offers Consciousness-Based℠ Education, a traditional academic curriculum enhanced with practice of the Transcendental Meditation® technique, which reduces stress, develops total brain functioning and better health, and cultivates creativity and intelligence. Students are encouraged to follow a more sustainable daily schedule that balances study, exercise, meditation, and rest, without the typical college burnout. All aspects of campus life nourish the body and mind, including organic vegetarian meals served fresh daily. Located in Fairfield, Iowa, MUM is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and offers bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees in the arts, sciences, humanities, and business. Visitors Weekends are held throughout the year. For more information, call the Admissions Office at 800-369-6480 or visit the MUM webpage.







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Washington Adventist University Receives Million Dollar Gift for New Health Professions, Science and Wellness Center


Takoma Park, Md. (PRWEB) January 22, 2015

Plans for a new Washington Adventist University (WAU) Health Professions, Science and Wellness Center in Takoma Park, Md. were advanced recently when health care executive and board member Bruce Boyer presented a $ 1 million check for the project at a meeting of the WAU Board of Trustees.

“This generous gift will go a long way toward making the vision for a new Health Professions, Science and Wellness Center a reality,” said WAU President Weymouth Spence, Ed.D., R.T. “The center will offer exciting and endless possibilities for this university as we find new ways to enhance the education of our students in the health and science professions, promote healthy living, and improve community wellness.”

The center will be built as a $ 10.3 million renovation and addition to the existing Health Professions Building on campus. When completed, the 50,000-square-foot center will accommodate WAU’s health professions and science programs, as well as community programs to enhance wellness. It will provide opportunities for the university to partner with the city and county in offering healthy cooking and exercise classes, among other wellness activities. The architect for the project is Hord, Coplan and Macht.

Boyer, who is president and chairman of Sloan Management, Inc. and Premier HealthCare, Inc., has a unique perspective on Washington Adventist University. He spent time on campus as a child in the 1950s when his parents attended the university, then known as Washington Missionary College; in the 1960s when he was a psychology major at the school, then known as Columbia Union College; and in the 1970s, when he joined the university’s board of trustees, then known as the Columbia Union College Board of Trustees.

In addition to Boyer’s recent gift, the new center is being funded through the university’s annual Visionaries Gala, along with support from the state of Maryland through a $ 4 million matching grant from the Governor’s Office. The grant application is being completed and funding approval is expected this year.

Individuals interested in contributing to the new facility are encouraged to email alumni(at)wau(dot)edu or call 301-891-4151. Online donations can be made at http://www.wau.edu/alumni/give-to-wau .

# # #

Washington Adventist University is Montgomery County’s only four-year private college. Part of the Seventh-day Adventist system of higher education, Washington Adventist University has been educating college students since 1904 on a 19-acre campus in suburban Takoma Park, close to the nation’s capital. A total of 1,080 students of all faiths participate in the university’s eight graduate and 32 undergraduate programs. The 2014 edition of U.S. News & World Report ranked Washington Adventist University among the best regional colleges in the north.

Media Contacts:

Angie Crews, 301-891-4134, acrews(at)wau(dot)edu

Donna Bigler, 240-286-1169, dbigler(at)wau(dot)edu







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Celebrate the New Year with Tips for a Lifelong Weight Loss Transformation from the University of Colorado Anschutz Health and Wellness Center


Aurora, Colo. (PRWEB) January 01, 2015

This year, resolve to make those weight loss resolutions stick. Holly Wyatt, MD and her staff at the University of Colorado Anschutz Health and Wellness Center have discovered several secrets that contribute to long-term weight loss success. Wyatt is the center’s associate director and co-author of “State of Slim,” the book that shows dieters how they can create their own state of slim no matter where they live.

Wyatt focuses on the mindset as much as diet and exercise in her transformational weight loss programs. Her newest program is Extreme Weight Loss: Destination Boot Camp. The first boot camps in October sold out and 2015 sessions are scheduled for March, June, and July.

To keep those resolutions long past the holiday and for lasting weight loss success, Wyatt encourages dieters to identify their personal “why” for losing weight, focus on positive aspects of weight loss, create a supportive environment and develop new habits to make healthy decisions. Her tips are just in time for the new year:


Find your “real” why: dig deep, identify your why and write it down. Recognizing your strong internal motivation will help you stick with new healthy behaviors for more than a few weeks.
Be honest, are you really ready to make a change: how high a priority is your resolution? If it’s not an 8 or higher on a scale of 0-10, you’re not likely to stick with the necessary behavioral changes for long-term success.
Out with the old, in with the new: new friends, new places, new routines and new behaviors all help with weight loss transformation success. Surrounding yourself with like-minded people makes it easier.
Road map to success: you know what your New Year’s resolution is, now you have to map out the transformational journey. Exactly what will you do to lose those 15 pounds or train for a 5K? Achievement is in the details.
Go public and get vulnerable: it’s scary but put yourself out there. Tell lots of people about your resolution. Good old-fashioned peer pressure makes you accountable. It’s harder to cheat when everyone’s checking up on you.
Nobody’s perfect: no weight loss transformation journey is perfect. Life gets in the way. Have a plan to navigate the bumps in the road and stay focused despite the slip-ups. The body achieves what the mind believes.
Don’t hold back: make the decision to achieve your resolution and jump in with both feet. Making a halfhearted commitment won’t cut it. Know your why, your what and your how, then go for it 100%.
Score a quick win: nothing makes you more determined or gives you more confidence than quick success. Take your big goal and break it into bite size achievable chunks and feel your willpower skyrocket.
Create an autopilot and cruise to success: resolutions get harder to keep after four to six weeks when the excitement wears off. Having a default autopilot plan in place makes it easy and boosts willpower.




Keep Weight Loss Goals on Track This Holiday Season with Secrets from the University of Colorado Anschutz Health and Wellness Center


Aurora, Colo. (PRWEB) December 23, 2014

The University of Colorado Anschutz Health and Wellness Center at the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, Colo. is home to a unique brand of weight loss transformation where mindset is just as important as diet and fitness. Holly Wyatt, MD is the center’s associate director and co-author of “State of Slim”, the book that teaches dieters how to create their own state of slim no matter where they live.

Wyatt’s weight loss programs are based on 30 years of science and research and teach principles from the book including the Colorado diet and the Colorado mindset. Her new weight loss program, Extreme Weight Loss: Destination Boot Camp, was a sell-out success in October and boot camp dates for March, June and July of 2015 have just been announced.

These tips from Dr. Wyatt help her program participants survive the temptations and indulgences of the season and give them another reason to celebrate success in the new year.


    Wallpaper your why: snap a picture of why you’re determined to lose weight, stay healthy and be fit. Make it your computer wallpaper and the background on your cell phone screen. One glance will give you all the extra willpower you need.

    Set a holiday goal: working toward and achieving a mini-goal will help you stay focused. Make it specific and realistic for the season— something that fits into the big picture of your long-term goals. It’ll set you up to succeed.

    Be the change: get rid of as many temptations as you can. Change the way you and others celebrate. Bring and serve healthy holiday food. Stay positive and inspire others to stay on track and you’ll end up motivating yourself.

    Start new traditions: traditional holiday fun doesn’t always fit with new healthy lifestyles. Try a recipe rehab on a family favorite, use smaller plates or arrange a family physical activity. One small change can make a big difference.

    Sleep to success: more sleep renews willpower and helps you make better food choices during the day. Set a bedtime 30 minutes earlier than normal, turn off the electronics and wake up recharged and refreshed.

    Set a holiday take action weight: setting a weight four to five pounds above normal gives you a little leeway but won’t let weight gain get out of control. Weigh yourself every morning. If you hit that high weight it’s time to cut back.

    Design a holiday cocktail: avoid the empty calories in alcohol. Create your own special drink for the season. Choose less alcohol or go completely alcohol-free with a “mocktail”. Use seltzer, Splenda and low calorie mixers.

    Make yourself move: keeping your activity level high will help keep all your other healthy behaviors in place. Don’t use “too busy” as an excuse. Schedule exercise into your day and make it your top priority.

    Go in with a game plan: deciding how you will enjoy the gathering ahead of time will help you take control of bad holiday behaviors. Eat ahead of time. Bring a healthy dish. Stand away from the food table. Choose to control the situation.

    Show gratitude and count your blessings: gratitude is key to a healthy mindset. Count your blessings daily and practice ways to celebrate them without food. The more you do it, the easier it becomes and the more you succeed.