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FDA Approves New Fat Destroying Injections to Treat Double Chins


Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) May 17, 2015

On April 29, 2015, the Washington Post in article titled “The New Botox? FDA Approves an Injection to Fight Double Chins,” reported on the Food and Drug Administration’s approval of the injectable drug Kybella for improvement in the appearance of submental fat in adults. Kybella is the only non-surgical treatment with FDA approval for reducing double chins. Kybella is a synthetic version of deoxycholic acid, the body’s natural fat absorber. (see: goo.gl/xJwVIx)

“This may be a real breakthrough minimally invasive treatment,” says Dr. Simon Ourian, Medical Director of Epione Beverly Hills. “We can do a lot to tighten the skin in that area non-invasively that might work well in conjunction with the fat-destroying properties of Kybella.”

According to the Washington Post article, submental fat is often resistant to exercise and diet and there appears to be a substantial market for Kybella. Almost 70% of respondents to a 2014 American Dermatologic Surgery survey named excess fat under the chin as their number one aesthetic complaint.

“The clinical trials are over and the FDA has granted approval,” says Dr. Ourian. “In June, when the product becomes available, we will be able to gauge consumer reaction. At this point, we don’t even know what the product will cost.”

Dr. Ourian has been a pioneer in laser technology and non-invasive aesthetic procedures including UltraShape, VelaShape, Restylane, Juvéderm, Radiesse, Sculptra, and CoolSculpting. These treatments are used for the correction or reversal of a variety of conditions such as acne, acne scars, skin discoloration, wrinkles, unwanted fat, stretch marks, varicose veins, cellulite, and others. More information about plastic surgery can be found on Epione’s website.







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Okayama University research: Enzyme-inhibitors treat drug-resistant epilepsy


Okayama, Japan (PRWEB UK) 27 April 2015

One percent of the world’s population suffer from epilepsy, and a third of sufferers cannot be treated with antiepileptic drugs. Diet control has been used to treat patients suffering from drug-resistant epilepsy since the 1920s, but how metabolic processes affect epilepsy has not been fully understood. Now researchers at Okayama University and Kawasaki Medical School have identified the metabolic pathways altered by diet treatments, the enzymes that can control them and potential metabolic drugs that may be effective for treating types of epilepsy that are resistant to other drugs.

‘Ketogenic’ diets used to treat epilepsy are high in fat and low in carbohydrate. Due to the scarcity of glucose available as a result, the brain metabolises ketones, which uses a different metabolic pathway.

Tsuyoshi Inoue and his team examined neural cells in an artificial cerebrospinal fluid solution switched from glucose to ketones. When glucose was switched to ketones the cells became hyperpolarized – a change in the cell’s membrane potential that makes neurons less prone to becoming excited and active.

The researchers further broke down the processes in the metabolism of glucose and identified a crucial enzyme – lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Blocking LDH mimicked the switch from glucose to ketones in vitro. Further in vivo tests on mice confirmed the effect.

By testing the drugs already in use they identified LDH inhibitory action in stiripentol, a drug used for a rare form of the epilepsy. By modifying its chemical structure, they found an alternative LDH inhibitor with a similar structure that was more effective for in vivo tests on mice. They conclude, “Our study opens a realistic path to develop compounds for drug-resistant epilepsy by targeting LDH enzymes with stiripentol derivatives.”

Background

Epilepsy

Epilepsy describes the neurological disorder that results in seizures that have no other known cause. The seizures result from excessive excitation in the cortical nerve in the brain and the length and severity of the seizures may vary.

The transmission of signals by neurons relies on the rapid rise and fall of the membrane potential, and is affected by cell polarization. When the cell membrane becomes hyperpolarized, a greater stimulus is required to produce an action potential. As a result hyperpolarization can prevent the excessive cortical activity that causes epileptic seizures.

Glucose and ketone metabolic pathways

Ketones directly activate the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle that generates energy in aerobic respiration. In contrast glucose and lactate are converted to pyruvate in glycolysis, which are then used as the main input and intermediates of the TCA cycle.

The researchers studied the activity of neural cells from the basal ganglia – a region of the brain that is important for the propagation of seizures – in artificial cerebrospinal fluid in vitro. They found that the replacement of glucose with ketones led to hyperpolarization of the cell membrane. The hyperpolarization was recovered by the addition of lactate, suggesting that inhibitors of the enzyme LDH – which catalyses the conversion of lactate into pyruvate – may have the same effect on epilepsy as ketogenic diets.

Stiripentol and analog

Stiripentol is an antiepileptic drug found to be effective for a particular type of epilepsy, Dravet syndrome. The chemical structure of stiripentol differs to most antiepileptic drugs, prompting the researchers to explore other chemicals with a similar structure that have LDH inhibiting and antiepileptic actions.

Isosafrole has a similar structure to stiripentol but with certain parts of the chemical structure absent (i.e. the hydroxyl and tertiary-butyl groups). The researchers found that isosafrole strongly inhibited LDH and suppressed signs of seizure such as spontaneous high voltage spikes and paroxysmal discharges in mice tests. The results suggest that LDH inhibitors may be effective for types of epilepsy that cannot be treated with traditional drugs.

Reference

Nagisa Sada, Suni Lee, Takashi Katsu, Takemi Otsuki, Tsuyoshi Inoue. Targeting LDH Enzymes with a Stiripentol Analog to Treat Epilepsy. Science (March 20, 2015) Vol. 347 no. 6228 pp. 1362-1367

DOI: 10.1126/science.aaa1299

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25792327

<Archive of Okayama University Research Updates>

Vol.1:Innovative non-invasive ‘liquid biopsy’ method to capture circulating tumor cells from blood samples for genetic testing

Vol.2:Ensuring a cool recovery from cardiac arrest

Vol.3:Organ regeneration research leaps forward

Vol.4:Cardiac mechanosensitive integrator

Vol.5:Cell injections get to the heart of congenital defects

Vol.6:Fourth key molecule identified in bone development

Vol.7:Anticancer virus solution provides an alternative to surgery

Vol.8:Light-responsive dye stimulates sight in genetically blind patients

Vol.9:Studies reveal how a diabetes drug helps towards the rejection of tumours by supporting immune cells

http://www.okayama-u.ac.jp/en/tp/release/release_id282.html

Further information

Okayama University

1-1-1 Tsushima-naka , Kita-ku , Okayama 700-8530, Japan

Planning and Public Information Division, Okayama University

E-mail: www-adm@adm.okayama-u.ac.jp

Website: http://www.okayama-u.ac.jp/index_e.html

Okayama Univ. e-Bulletin: http://www.okayama-u.ac.jp/user/kouhou/ebulletin/

About Okayama University (You Tube):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDL1coqPRYI

About Okayama University

Okayama University is one of the largest comprehensive universities in Japan with roots going back to the Medical Education House sponsored by the Lord of Okayama and established in 1870. Now with 1,300 faculty and 14,000 students, the University offers courses in specialties ranging from medicine and pharmacy to humanities and physical sciences. Okayama University is located in the heart of Japan approximately 3 hours west of Tokyo by Shinkansen.







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Northeast Houston Vein Center Offers Tips on How to Treat Achy Legs

Humble, TX (PRWEB) April 27, 2015

Sitting or standing for long periods of time can cause the legs to ache and feel tired, and for those whose occupation requires them to be sitting while they are working, such as receptionists and taxi cab drivers, or to be on their feet for most of the day, such as teachers and hairdressers, the discomfort can be more severe and longer lasting. These people suffer from a condition known as tired, achy leg syndrome. Dr. Madaiah Revana of Northeast Houston Vein Center is offering tips on how to treat this condition.

Some of the causes of achy leg syndrome include:

Peripheral Arterial Disease
Varicose Veins
Restless Leg Syndrome
Chronic Venous Insufficiency
Imbalanced Diet
Lack of Exercise
All of these lead to poor circulation in the legs. Through the veins, blood is returned to the heart as it circulates throughout the body. Because the heart is at a much higher position in the body, blood in the legs has to “pump” against gravity in order to reach it. Contractions in the leg muscles squeeze the veins and push the blood upward.

To keep the blood flowing up, and not back down, the veins contain one-way valves that only come into play when walking or being active. During long periods of inactivity, standing or sitting in the same position for a long time, the legs do not contract hard or frequent enough to force the blood upwards. When the one-way valves become damaged, they allow blood to leak backwards. As a result, the blood pools and gathers into the veins, causing them to have tension and heaviness, making them feel tired and achy.

Symptoms of the condition can include uncomfortable feelings in the legs towards the end of the day. Discomfort can turn into cramping in the leg, cold feet or a feeling of tension that leads to heaviness and pain and/or tiredness. Swelling in the ankles and itchiness and discoloration of the skin may appear. Rest usually eases the symptoms, but it does not eliminate them completely.

Most people who suffer from achy legs are instructed to wear compression stockings. Although these are helpful, they do not treat the underlying cause of symptoms. When compression stockings and leg elevation are not enough, there are alternatives that rid the problems for good.

At Northeast Houston Vein Center, Dr. Revana treats chronic venous insufficiency that causes achy legs using a newer technique called endovenous thermal ablation. This minimally invasive procedure uses high-frequency radio waves to create intense local heat in the affected vein. This treatment closes off the diseased vein and enables the blood to re-route itself to the other health veins. With minimal bleeding and bruising, this results in less pain and a faster return to normal activities, unlike vein stripping.

For more information about Dr. Revana and achy leg syndrome treatment, call 281-446-4638 or visit http://www.nehoustonveincenter.com.

About Northeast Houston Vein Center:

The experienced physicians at Northeast Houston Vein Center offer comprehensive vein treatment in the Houston area. They provide the latest techniques and state-of-the-art equipment in the diagnosis and treatment of venous disease. Since its establishment in 1978, the medical professionals at Northeast Houston Vein Center have been dedicated to going above and beyond for their patients. Treatment options are minimally invasive and the outpatient procedures will allow patients to resume normal activities the same day. At Northeast Houston Vein Center, patients can imagine a life free of venous disease. For more information, visit their website at http://nehoustonveincenter.com/.







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Bright Road Recovery Announces It Will Treat Orthorexia, Or Healthy Eating Gone Wrong


(PRWEB) March 11, 2015

Articles about clean eating, juice cleanses, veganism, the Paleo diet, low-carb eating and countless others are everywhere these days, making it difficult to know just what exactly to eat. Everyone has a friend who swears by one eating style or another, and people who are able to stick with a diet get endless praise about their willpower and lifestyle.

But dieting can hide a new kind of eating disorder. Studies show that some people, in an attempt to become healthy, develop an obsession around healthy eating that, like anorexia, can impact health and wellness. Called orthorexia, it is the slow elimination of foods from the diet which affects the ability to eat normally.

A person with orthorexia is focused on defining and strictly maintaining a perfect diet. Orthorexia may manifest as an aversion to foods with artificial ingredients, non-organic foods or GMO foods. It can extend to foods containing sugar, fat, salt, dairy or other ingredients the person might consider unhealthy.

“Orthorexia is an insidious condition,” said Claire St John, a Registered Dietitian at Bright Road Recovery in Claremont, CA. “Healthy eaters get all kinds of positive feedback from friends and family about how great their diet is and how admirable their willpower is. This can lead to further food elimination until there are very few ‘okay’ foods, resulting in food fixation, inability to eat with others and, at worst, nutrient deficiencies and dangerously low body weight.”

Bright Road Recovery, an outpatient eating disorder treatment center in Claremont Village, is well placed to address orthorexia with its new Health & Wellness program, offering nutrition and fitness counseling that rejects the diet hype and helps clients meet their goals without sacrificing their health or enjoyment of food.

“Our Health & Wellness program is tailored to each client,” said Tamson Overholtzer, Bright Road Recovery’s Executive Director. “We start with professional nutritional counseling, and then depending on a client’s needs, we may suggest other resources to support any areas of concern. It’s a healthy way for clients to achieve their goals without slipping into a problem they didn’t see coming.”

Bright Road Recovery is the first outpatient eating disorder program in our area to make general nutritional counseling available outside of the eating disorder treatment program.

“Our expanded services meet the needs of clients who are stepping down from higher levels of care or who are looking for nutritional guidance unrelated to eating disorders, but with an eye toward protecting against developing disordered eating habits”, Overholtzer said.

For additional information, see our website at http://www.brightroadrecovery.com or contact us at (909)994-1436.







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