Archive for Study

Push to Walk Partners with Seton Hall University for Study


Riverdale, NJ (PRWEB) May 28, 2015

Throughout the past few months, Push to Walk has acted as a study site for research comparing the validity and reliability of the Shaw Gait Assessment in comparison to the GaitRite. Dr. Preeti Nair, P.T., Ph.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at Seton Hall University is the principle investigator for the study.

The Shaw Gait Assessment is a free online tool, where the GaitRite is a $ 30,000 piece of equipment. The GaitRite is considered the gold standard in providing information about how someone walks. It can collect data on walking speed, distance, and time between steps. The Shaw Gait Assessment has been shown to provide comparable data to the GaitRite for populations who have suffered stroke or been diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, but to date, no information has been gathered about the reliability of the Shaw Gait Assessment for incomplete spinal cord injury.

This is the first time Push to Walk has collaborated with a university to conduct research at its facility. Once the data is analyzed, Dr. Nair hopes that she can publish the results as a poster to be presented at various conferences. “It is a great opportunity for Push to Walk to partner with an institution such as Seton Hall. Our top priority has always been providing high quality exercise to optimize the health and quality of life of our clients. With this research collaboration, we also wish to show that we are capable of making a bigger contribution to the science behind exercise and neuro-rehabilitation. In doing so, we hope to find even better ways of benefitting our clients and other people living with paralysis. We are lucky to have a researcher like Dr. Nair and Seton Hall University willing to help and guide us on this mission,” says Push to Walk Program Director, Tommy Sutor. If the results of the study are positive, it will show that places like Push to Walk, who normally couldn’t afford expensive pieces of equipment like the GaitRite, can still gather useful and meaningful data about changes in their clients’ abilities using the Shaw Gait Assessment.

Donation opportunities are available on the Push to Walk website: http://www.pushtowalknj.org. For more information, please contact Stephanie Lajam at (862) 200-5848 or slajam(at)pushtowalknj(dot)org.

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About Push to Walk

Founded in 2007, Push to Walk is an organization that provides individualized workouts and resources to people with spinal cord injuries and other forms of paralysis to optimize current quality of life and to prepare for future medical advancements. It is the only program of its kind in the New York- New Jersey area. Push to Walk’s rigorous one-on-one workout approach challenges clients to reach their personal goals and achieve maximum independence, leading to greater success and fulfillment in their personal and professional lives. Push to Walk is only able to cover about 65% of its operating costs through client fees, and relies on grants and fundraising events to help make up the difference. A 501(C)3 non-profit, Push to Walk is located in Riverdale, New Jersey. Visit http://www.pushtowalknj.org to learn more.







New Study Shows a Plant-Based Vegan Diet Improves Diabetic Neuropathy Pain, Lowers Body Weight

Washington, DC (PRWEB) May 28, 2015

A plant-based diet reduces the pain of diabetic neuropathy, according to new research published this week in Nutrition & Diabetes* by researchers with the Physicians Committee, California State University, East Bay, and the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

Neuropathy is a complication of diabetes manifesting as pain, numbness, and other nerve symptoms. The pilot study put 17 adults on a low-fat vegan diet for 20 weeks, with weekly nutrition classes. The researchers found significant improvements in pain, measured by the Short Form McGill Pain questionnaire, the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument physical assessment, and through electrochemical skin conductance in the foot. The participants also lost an average of 14 pounds.

“A dietary intervention reduces the pain associated with diabetic neuropathy, apparently by improving insulin resistance” notes Neal Barnard, M.D., president of the Physicians Committee. “The same diet also improves body weight and reduces cholesterol and blood pressure.”

Sixty percent of diabetes patients suffer from peripheral neuropathy, which is associated with hypertension, obesity, gait disturbances, amputations, anxiety, depression, and reduced quality of life.

“The dietary intervention is easy to prescribe and easy to follow,” says Cameron Wells, M.P.H., R.D., acting director of nutrition education for the Physicians Committee. “Steel-cut oats, leafy greens, and lentils are widely available at most food markets and fit well into most budgets.”

According to a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine**, patients who receive just 5.5 extra minutes of nutrition counseling from their primary care physician lose five pounds, reduce saturated fat intake, and improve LDL cholesterol.

More than 29 million Americans have diabetes. One in three children born in 2000 will develop diabetes at some point in his or her life.

The average lifetime cost to treat type 2 diabetes is $ 85,200, half of which is spent on diabetes complications.

Founded in 1985 by Neal Barnard, M.D., the Physicians Committee is a nonprofit health organization, with more than 12,000 doctor members, that promotes preventive medicine, conducts clinical research, and encourages higher standards for ethics and effectiveness in research.

*http://www.nature.com/nutd/journal/v5/n5/full/nutd20158a.html

**http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=484995







Dr. Rod J. Rohrich Publishes Retrospective Study on Facelift Surgery in MWL Patients


Dallas, Texas (PRWEB) April 29, 2015

Texas plastic surgeon, Dr. Rod J. Rohrich, and colleagues, have published a retrospective study on special needs and outcomes of facelift surgery in the massive weight loss patient population. The study was published in the February issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Individuals considered to be massive weight loss (MWL) patients are often defined as those who have lost more than 50% of their excess body weight via either diet and exercise or by undergoing bariatric surgery. Facial aesthetics is often one of the greatest concerns for these patients, who often complain about sagging skin in the cheeks and neck.

The study, which carefully reviews Dr. Rohrich’s considerable history of facelift patient outcomes, offers guidance and feedback to plastic surgeons performing facelift surgery on patients who have lost a considerable amount of weight. In comparison to a typical facelift patient, for example, MWL facelift patients will often require a much larger volume of facial fat augmentation, increased tightening of the cheek and neck area to address excess skin, and more extensive elevation of the underlying muscle and facial tissue.

“Massive weight loss patients are a unique class of patients,” explains Dr. Rohrich, the study’s senior author. “As we study the outcomes of these patients, more and more we are finding that special considerations should be taken with these patients to maximize the outcomes of the surgery and reduce complications.”

Dr. Rohrich, a longstanding advocate of individual analysis in facelift surgery, views the study’s results as a good example of the importance of component facelifts which are tailored to each patient’s individual situation. The appropriate surgical plan for these patients, says Dr. Rohrich, will depend on a large number of factors such as the patient’s skin laxity, fat atrophy, and overall facial shape.

“Studies like this are invaluable tools to help us refine our surgical approach so that we can achieve the best, and safest possible outcomes for our patients,” says Dr. Rohrich, who is also editor in chief of the Journal. “Fundamentally, what patients desire is to look like themselves and have their sense of identity restored, something that may be taken away from them after massive weight loss.”

About Dr. Rod J. Rohrich

Dr. Rod J. Rohrich is a Distinguished Teaching Professor and Founding Chairman of the Department of Plastic Surgery at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Rohrich graduated from Baylor College of Medicine with high honors, and completed residencies at the University of Michigan Medical Center and fellowships at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard (hand/microsurgery) and Oxford University (pediatric plastic surgery). He has served as president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, the largest organization of board certified plastic surgeons in the world. He repeatedly has been selected by his peers as one of America’s best doctors, and twice has received one of his profession’s highest honors, the Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation Distinguished Service Award, which recognizes his contributions to education in plastic surgery. Dr. Rohrich participates in and has led numerous associations and councils for the advancement of plastic and reconstructive surgery.







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How Exercise Protects From Dementia, New Study Shows


Rock Hill, South Carolina (PRWEB) April 21, 2015

A new study from Sweden’s National Institute for Health and Welfare finds that individuals who are at risk of dementia have a much better chance of staving off the condition by combining mental and physical exercise. In some tests, those participants who followed such a regimen saw startling results when compared to a control group.

Recently published in The Lancet, the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability recruited 1260 participants, all between the ages of 60 and 77. Each was deemed to be at risk for dementia at the top of the study.

One half of the participants were regularly given “comprehensive intervention” related to some of the most serious health risk factors for that age group, including dementia itself, heart concerns or a high body-mass index. The remaining participants made up the control group and were only given standard health advice over the course of the two year study.

The overall processing speed of those who received the comprehensive guidance was found to be a shocking 150% higher than the control group. Meanwhile the brain’s executive functioning, where thoughts and memories are organized, was 83% higher in the first group.

In all, the control group was found to be 25% lower from the invention group when all cognitive testing was averaged out.

Dr. Sandeep Grewal, author of the book “Dementia Express: Lose Your Memory in 100 Ways”, has been encouraging patients to combine mental and physical exercise for years. An internal medicine specialist practicing in both Carolinas, Grewal has long been fascinated by how the mind is used, and sometimes under-used.

“There is so much we don’t understand yet about our brains,” Dr. Grewal says, “but one thing this study definitively demonstrates is how crucial good physical health is to supporting solid mental health. It is another muscle, after all.”

Grewal’s book “Dementia Express” was specifically written out as a logic problem, challenging readers on each page to factually assess what they’re reading in order to deduce the actual messages hidden within. The book’s subtitle, “Lose Your Mind is 100 Ways” is itself seemingly counterintuitive.

“We see it in our practices every day as doctors,” Dr. Grewal continues. “how closely intertwined the mind and body truly are. If you take good care of one, it’s much easier to take care of the other.”

Dr. Grewal went on to praise the Swedish professors who led the research, saying “They’ve shown us a powerful tool in helping seniors stay mentally sharp while also exercising the body. Their results were striking, and the message is a very positive one.”

“I wrote Dementia Express to encourage seniors to give their minds a work-out as well,” he continues, “while also of course strongly encouraging physical exercise. Earlier studies have also demonstrated a strong link between the two, but nothing with the stark results shown here.”

“This should drive people to action and may even change how we doctors treat those at risk,” he explains. “The message is clear: if you know someone at risk of dementia, you need to keep them moving and active, from the neck up and the neck down.”

The Swedish study is scheduled to continue for several years to gauge any decline or improvement seen in cognitive abilities among the intervention group.

Dr. Grewal’s book, “Dementia Express” is available on Amazon.

Attribution:

News Medical (Apr. 6, 2015) – http://www.news-medical.net/news/20150406/Healthy-eating-exercise-and-brain-training-programme-results-in-slower-mental-decline-for-older-people.aspx







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PuraCath Medical Presents Study at National Kidney Foundation 2015 Spring Clinical Meetings


Dallas, Texas (PRWEB) March 27, 2015

PuraCath Medical, an emerging company in the development of technologies to reduce infections in patients with intravascular and peritoneal catheters, announced today that it presented new scientific data on its proprietary ultraviolet light-based technology during the National Kidney Foundation’s (NKF) 2015 Spring Clinical Meetings. The study presented reported on the ability to reduce bacterial growth in a simulated peritoneal dialysis delivery system when combining ultraviolet (UV) light with a UV transmissible connection system. This data confirms the effectiveness of combining UV light with a UV transmissible connection system to reduce bacterial growth across a wider range of bacteria and a fungi (Candida albicans) which are known to contribute to infections and peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients. The current study builds on earlier research the company presented at the American Society of Nephrology meeting in 2014.

“PuraCath Medical’s technology is a revolutionary approach to reducing the risk of infections that could lead to a change in the way peritoneal dialysis is performed,” stated Alberto Sabucedo, M.D., Ph.D., from the Department of Nephrology and Hypertension at the University of Miami. “This is a promising technology that will enable a better quality of life for patients on peritoneal dialysis, and I look forward to utilizing in my practice when it is available for clinical use.”

“While there is increasing interest in the use of peritoneal dialysis therapy to manage patients with end-stage renal disease, patients still currently remain at risk of developing infections and peritonitis from low compliance with rigorous disinfection protocols, impacting their ability to remain on this therapy for the long term,” said Julia Rasooly, PuraCath Medical’s CEO. “The study we presented at the NKF meeting confirms that our approach to reduce bacterial growth through the use of a novel UV light-based PD purification system is effective across a wider range of microorganisms than we initially tested. Based on the results of this study and the rapid progress we have made with our product development efforts to date, we look to initiate the first clinical studies of our technology in PD patients in the near future. PuraCath believes in the value and the lifestyle convenience peritoneal dialysis therapy offers to patients and we are developing a PD disinfection system that enhances PD patient’s quality of life and also provides an easy-to-use, patient friendly option to reducing bacterial and fungal contamination during PD exchanges. We feel confident that this will allow a broader range of patients to benefit from the quality of life of treatment on PD.”

WHAT IS PERITONEAL DIALYSIS?

Peritoneal dialysis is a home-based dialysis therapy that offers patients a more flexible and physiologically smoother dialysis option. Unlike hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis uses a patient’s peritoneal membrane to remove toxins and excess fluid from a patient. Peritoneal dialysis therapy permits patients to have a more regular diet and more flexible treatment times, improving their quality of life. Currently there are over 45,000 peritoneal dialysis patients in the U.S. with the number of patients on this therapy increasing over the past several years. The most common complications from peritoneal dialysis include infection around the catheter site or infection of the lining of the abdominal wall (peritonitis).

ABOUT PURACATH MEDICAL

PuraCath Medical is a company based in San Francisco, CA and is dedicated to improving the quality of life for the dialysis patient by reducing infections related to peritoneal dialysis (PD) and saving time through improved, simplified connection of PD catheters. The Company utilizes technology that was spun out of Stanford University and is developing a novel, easy-to-use technology designed to reduce the risk of infections in patients with intravascular and peritoneal catheters in order to decrease infection-related hospitalizations and their associated costs.

For more information on PuraCath Medical, please visit http://www.puracath.com.







Pesticides Not the Sole Culprit in Honey Bee Colony Declines: UMD Study


(PRWEB) March 18, 2015

Colony declines are a major threat to the world’s honey bees, as well as the many wild plants and crops the bees pollinate. Among the lineup of possible culprits—including parasites, disease, climate stress and malnutrition—many have pointed the finger squarely at insecticides as a prime suspect. However, a new study from the University of Maryland shows that the world’s most common insecticide does not significantly harm honey bee colonies at real-world dosage levels.

The study, which was published March 18, 2015 in the journal PLOS ONE, looked at the effects of the insecticide imidacloprid on honey bee colonies over a three-year period. To see significant negative effects, including a sharp decrease in winter survival rates, the researchers had to expose the colonies to at least four times as much insecticide encountered under normal circumstances. At 20 times the normal exposure levels, the colonies experienced more severe consequences.

The study does not totally absolve imidacloprid of a causative role in honey bee colony declines. Rather, the results indicate that insecticides are but one of many factors causing trouble for the world’s honey bee populations.

“Everyone is pointing the finger at these insecticides. If you pull up a search on the Internet, that’s practically all anyone is talking about,” said Galen Dively, emeritus professor of entomology at UMD and lead author of the study. “This paper says no, it’s not the sole cause. It contributes, but there is a bigger picture.”

Imidacloprid is one of a broad class of insecticides called neonicotinoids, so named because they are chemically derived from nicotine. In tobacco and other related plants, nicotine acts as a deterrent by poisoning would-be herbivores. While nicotine itself was once used as an insecticide, it has fallen out of favor because it is highly toxic to humans and breaks down rapidly in sunlight. Neonicotinoids have been engineered specifically to address these shortcomings.

“Imidacloprid is the most widely used insecticide in the world. It’s not restricted because it is very safe—an order of magnitude safer than organophosphates,” Dively said, drawing a comparison with a class of chemicals known to be highly toxic to nearly all living things.

For the study, Dively and his colleagues fed pollen dosed with imidacloprid to honey bee colonies. The team purposely constructed a worst-case scenario, even at lower exposure levels. For example, they fed the colonies tainted food for up to 12 continuous weeks. This is a much longer exposure than bee colonies would experience in real-world scenarios, because most crops do not bloom for such an extended period of time.

Even at these longer exposure periods, realistic dosage levels of imidacloprid did not cause significant effects in the honey bee colonies. Only at higher levels did the colonies start to have trouble producing healthy offspring and surviving through the winter.

“A lot of attention has been paid to neonicotinoids, but there isn’t a lot of field data. This study is among the first to address that gap,” said Dennis vanEngelsdorp, an assistant professor of entomology at UMD who was not involved in the study. “It’s not surprising that higher levels will hurt insects. They’re insecticides after all. But this study is saying that neonicotinoids probably aren’t the sole culprit at lower, real-world doses.”

Dively and vanEngelsdorp both agree that a synergistic combination of many factors is most likely to blame for colony declines. Climate stress could be taking a toll, and malnutrition could be a factor as well. The latter is a particular concern for industrial bee colonies that are rented to large-scale agricultural operations. These bees spend much of their time eating pollen from one or two crops, which throws their diet out of balance.

“Except for the imidacloprid exposure, our test colonies were treated well,” said coauthor David Hawthorne, associate professor of entomology at UMD and director of education at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC). “They weren’t exposed to additional real-world stressors such as malnourishment or multiple pesticides. Colonies coping with these additional pressures may be more sensitive to imidacloprid.”

Dively, Hawthorne and their colleagues found some evidence for at least one synergistic combination. At the highest dosage levels (20 times the realistic dosage) colonies became more susceptible to Varroa mites, parasites that target honey bee colonies. A mite infestation can cause a whole variety of problems, including viral infections and an increased need for other pesticides to control the mites.

“It’s a multifactorial issue, with lots of stress factors,” Dively said. “Honey bees have a lot of pests and diseases to deal with. Insecticide exposure is one factor among many. It’s not the lone villain.”

In addition to Dively and Hawthorne, study authors included UMD technician Michael Embrey, Alaa Kamel of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Jeffery Pettis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.







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Mediterranean Diet Has Huge Health Benefits, New Study Finds

Mediterranean Diet Has Huge Health Benefits, New Study Finds

TimesCast: The Times’s Gina Kolata talks about a new study, published on The New England Journal of Medicine’s Web site, focusing on the health benefits of a Mediterranean diet. Related article:…

The complete appetite control you experience on this #LCHF #KETO #BANTING diet allows your own body to become a trustworthy guide to how much to eat and how often to eat it. Your own body …
Video Rating: 4 / 5

New Study on BioCell Collagen Published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition (JISSN)


Newport Beach, CA (PRWEB) February 23, 2015

BioCell Technology announced today the publication of a new clinical study on BioCell Collagen®. The study, now indexed on PubMed, describes the potential of BioCell Collagen® for protecting the connective tissue of the musculoskeletal system and enhancing recovery from intense exercise. The randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study was carried out by investigators at the Center for Applied Health Sciences (CAHS) who presented data in June at the 2014 International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) Conference in Clearwater Beach, Florida, USA.

Earlier clinical studies of BioCell Collagen® have substantiated its safety and efficacy in promoting joint health and skin beauty. As these studies provide evidence that the patented healthy aging ingredient supports various connective tissues throughout the body, this proof-of-concept study was conducted to investigate whether daily intake of BioCell Collagen® for six weeks could protect skeletal muscle connective tissue following an intense exercise challenge, and also enhance recovery. Data from the study showed that BioCell Collagen® attenuated deleterious changes in muscle tissue damage and inflammatory biomarkers including creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and C-reactive protein. In addition, subjects who took BioCell Collagen® appeared to show a more robust “repeated bout effect” as compared to placebo, suggesting augmented tissue recovery and remodeling.    

“Extending its market-leading position as a key joint and skin health ingredient, this new clinical study in recreationally active healthy subjects provides intriguing dataset suggesting that this patented, research-backed dietary supplement has promising new applications in sports nutrition” says Suhail Ishaq, president of BioCell Technology, “This opens up a new category in sports nutrition regarding connective tissue protection and recovery from post-workout soreness and limiting repetitive, overuse related injuries.”

The details of the abstract are published on the JISSN website:

http://www.jissn.com/content/11/S1/P48

About BioCell Collagen®:

BioCell Collagen® is a science based clinically substantiated dietary ingredient that promotes active joints, younger looking skin, and healthy connective tissues. Unlike other collagen and hyaluronic acid ingredients on the market, BioCell Collagen® contains a patented composition of naturally occurring hydrolyzed collagen type II, chondroitin sulfate, and hyaluronic acid in a highly absorbable matrix form that has been the subject of numerous human clinical trials including safety, efficacy, and bioavailability. BioCell Collagen® is a registered trademark of BioCell Technology, LLC (Protected by US and International Patents ). The BioCell Collagen® logo of authenticity is proudly displayed on the labels of finished products that contain BioCell Collagen®. For more information and a directory of where to buy products made with BioCell Collagen®, visit http://www.BioCellCollagen.com.

About BioCell Technology:

BioCell Technology LLC, is in the business of researching, developing, branding, and distributing innovative, science based raw material ingredients that have applications in health and beauty. The company is headquartered in Newport Beach, California USA and operates facilities in Anaheim, California, and Elmshorn, Germany. The company’s executive management team is composed of industry veterans and scientists with decades of experience. Founded in 1997, the company’s goal is to provide non-invasive, economically feasible, long-term solutions that improve quality of life for people all over the globe. As a steward of quality and integrity, BioCell Technology believes that licensing is the best way to ensure the quality, safety, and efficacy of the innovative finished products that contain their branded ingredients in the market. The company’s products are rooted in quality and science and were developed with sustainability in mind. The company does not sell finished products, but rather licenses its branded ingredients to leading consumer packaged goods companies for use in their finished products. Each of the branded ingredients have a trademarked logo of authenticity that is proudly displayed on the labels of finished products licensed by BioCell Technology and marketed by leading consumer packaged goods companies under their own brand names or formulas. For more information visit http://www.BioCellTechnology.com.







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New Study Finds Magnesium May Slow Progress of Diabetes, Retailer Reports

Freeport, ME (PRWEB) February 27, 2015

Royal River Natural Foods, a locally-owned independent natural health store in Freeport, ME, reports a new study that found adults who got the most magnesium were less than half as likely to develop type 2 diabetes compared to those who got the least magnesium, with the largest benefit in those with elevated blood sugar levels.

The report is part of the March 2015 issue of “Natural Insights for Well Being®,” which Royal River Natural Foods publishes free each month for the Freeport community to learn more about the latest in nutrition science. Also in the March issue, men and women who got the most omega-3 fatty acids were less than half as likely to develop heart disease, and doctors in a new study said diets poor in vitamins A, C, D and omega-3s can contribute to Alzheimer’s disease in older adults, among other important findings.

“This month’s issue offers hope for healthy living and aging with simple, safe and affordable nutrition steps almost everyone can take,” said Becky Foster, supplement manager. “New scientific findings we present this month come from such well-respected peer-reviewed scientific journals as ‘Diabetes Care,’ the ‘American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,’ the ‘Nutrition Research Journal,’ and several others.”

“Natural Insights for Well Being®“ is free, and Royal River Natural Foods invites all those who wish to gain more valuable nutrition knowledge to stop in and pick up the March issue and meet the friendly, knowledgeable staff.

About the company:

Founded in 1994, Royal River Natural Foods is a unique community, natural food store. They are committed to well-being, body and soul. Experience their outstanding customer service in a warm and welcoming environment. Royal River Natural Foods proudly features local organic food, produce, locally-raised beef, chicken, lamb, pork and seafood, healthy takeout foods, bulk foods, snacks, special dietary products, specialty wines, micro-brewed beers, gourmet food made in Maine, unique gifts, eco-friendly products and much more. Royal River Natural Foods is committed to providing local, organic and sustainably-produced foods that enrich their customers’ lives. For more information about Royal River Natural Foods, visit their website at http://www.rrnf.com.







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Connie Casad, MD, Now Accepting Test Participants for January Dietary Detoxification Study

Dallas, TX (PRWEB) December 24, 2014

Connie Casad, MD, a well-known and respected gynecologist, bioidentical hormone specialist and functional medicine advocate with 30 years of practice experience in Dallas, Texas, has announced a second trial to evaluate the health benefits of dietary detoxification. The second study is scheduled to begin in January with new participants following excellent results from test patients who just completed a 21-day detoxification regimen.

When asked to explain her interest in conducting the study, Dr. Casad said, “About 10 years ago, I realized I could no longer consume beverages or foods with caffeine after about 4 p.m. without having sleep problems. As I set out to understand why this happens, I learned a lot about food and environmental toxins and the effect they have on human health. What I discovered was that over time our livers do not work as well as they once did. One of the ways we determine that the liver function is not as efficient is if we cannot tolerate caffeine well. This discovery was an important factor in my decision to re-educate myself about human health and wellness so I could offer patients preventative solutions instead of just treating disease with medicine.”

After years of specialized training and advanced medical education, Dr. Casad conducted her first study program in November. Thirty of her patients entered the study designed to evaluate the health benefits of a 21-day regimen of dietary detoxification. Twenty-seven of the participants completed the process. More than 80 percent reported excellent results, including improved sleep, more energy, fewer aches and pains, and most importantly, individual weight loss from 5 to 14 pounds depending on the individual.

“We live in an environment with increased exposure to toxins much more abundant than even 30 years ago,” said Dr. Casad. “The list includes pesticides, herbicides and industrial chemicals that can infiltrate the human body through food, water and the air we breathe. Constant exposure leads to these unwanted elements becoming trapped in the body’s tissues which has been shown to negatively impact health and wellness and is believed to contribute to the development of chronic disease. I am not at all surprised at the quality of the results we saw.”

She continued, “A medically planned and supervised body cleanse can allow our systems to burn fat that stores unwanted compounds that affect our health. As we oxidize toxins, they become water soluble allowing the liver to process and eliminate them. Our study program included three meals a day, two of which were medically supported shakes. The third meal came from dietary choices rich in protein, foods without any sugar, and gluten-free grains in moderation. Individuals were encouraged to drink lots of fresh water, eight to 12 glasses a day. Snacks were allowed as long as they met the previously mentioned conditions. During the cleanse, we supported the body with selected supplements under my supervision.”

“I have done this program myself with noticeable benefits. I now will encourage my patients to consider doing this once or twice a year. An elimination cleansing diet of 21 days helped study participants to feel better, sleep better, eliminate headaches, lessen bloating and other intestinal conditions, improve joint health, and restore overall vitality while helping their bodies withstand all of the internal and external stressors we experience in our daily active lives.”

Those interested in joining the January dietary detoxification study program should contact Dr. Casad at her office by calling (972) 566-5335.

About the practice:

Dr. Connie Casad is the medical director of a restorative wellness practice based in Dallas, TX, offering personalized attention and care that patients will not always find at other medical practices. Dr. Casad focuses on improving the health and wellness of women using Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy (BHRT). She specializes in creating integrated, comprehensive and individualized programs for her patients to resolve age-related diseases in addition to stress and weight management issues. Focusing on prevention, Dr. Casad encourages her patients to preserve and promote long-term wellness by taking proactive measures towards achieving health and beauty from the inside out. For more information, visit http://www.bio-identicaldoctors.com/.