Archive for Stress

Medicine World Enterprises, LLC – Stress and Hormones Affect Weight More Than Previously Understood

New York, NY (PRWEB) April 08, 2015

Very few professionals would argue with the proposition that diet and exercise combine to represent the fundamental components of weight management. However, it turns out that two other factors, stress and hormones contribute significantly. They appear to interact and contribute to the ways that most people process food and benefit from exercise. The good news is that both are manageable to a degree that has significant bearing on weight control.

Dr. Veronica Anderson has analyzed data from the Mayo Clinic, Harvard, and other reliable sources. She recognizes that the general categories of food consumption and exercise have multiple subcategories including genetics, hormonal issues, diet quality, sleep, and stress. The public least understands stress and hormones, but they offer everyone the best opportunity to make adjustments.

The way Dr. Veronica describes the connection is that stress is the human body’s natural response to perceived threats. An example she uses is that you suddenly realize your toddler has wandered away from your sight at a park playground. A region of the brain known as the hypothalamus stimulates adrenal glands that release adrenaline and cortisol. The adrenaline raises your heart rate, blood pressure, and energy. It is cortisol, the number one stress hormone, which increases the sugar supply in the bloodstream (leading to weight gain), inhibits the immune system, and suppresses digestion. Other by-products include fear, mood disruptions, and reduced motivation.

In the example, as soon as you notice your child emerge from a play structure, the hormone levels normalize and everything else self regulates once again. However, today’s world has a way of maintaining elevated levels of stress beyond normal parameters. Long-term stress response, even at the relatively low levels we experience in competitive working environments, leads to heart disease, sleep disorders, depression, memory impairment, and weight gain.

Unfortunately, the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) has increased the problem since it has resulted in a reduction in reimbursements to physicians who deal with these issues. Proactive health care practitioners such as Dr. Veronica advise against taking pills that only mask the symptoms. Rather, she recommends managing stress with her 5 Pillars of Health program that include: 1-Detoxification, 2-Nutrition, 3-Fitness, 4-Nervous System Maintenance, and 5-Hormonal Regulation.

While stress reduction strategies such as meditation, yoga, and other relaxation techniques play a role, Dr. Veronica notes the long-term solutions to uncontrollable weight extend beyond those. She adds, “You cannot just quit your job or get a divorce.” She instructs people that they must learn about the cycle of stress and sustainable methods to break it.

About Dr. Veronica Anderson:

Dr. Veronica has appeared on all major news networks including NBC, CBS, ABC, Fox News Network, and CNN. She has been published multiple times on Huffington Post. She hosts the radio show, Wellness for the REAL World on BlogTalkRadio. She is an avid proponent of combining traditional Western medical care with holistic and alternative remedies. Dr. Veronica M.D. is headquartered at 1485 Fifth Ave. #19-D New York, New York. Contact Dr. Veronica at 609.577.9893 or online at: info@drveronica.com

Sources:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/weight-loss/in-depth/metabolism/art-20046508

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/obesity-prevention-source/obesity-causes/







UMass Medical School, Worcester Polytechnic Institute Developing Smartphone App to Address Stress Eating


WORCESTER, Mass. (PRWEB) February 02, 2015

Researchers at UMass Medical School and Worcester Polytechnic Institute are developing a stress-eating smartphone app that will help users better understand why they overeat, with the support of a $ 2 million award from the National Institutes of Health.

Development of the “RELAX” application and a pilot clinical study to evaluate its effectiveness will be led by Sherry Pagoto, PhD, associate professor of medicine at UMMS, and Bengisu Tulu, PhD, associate professor in the WPI Foisie School of Business, joint principal investigators for the grant.

“Most commercial apps available today focus on tracking diet and exercise, but do not help the user understand why they are eating so much and/or exercising so little,” Dr. Pagoto said. “Our clinical and research experience suggests that stress is a very common trigger for overeating and it is a barrier to exercise.”

RELAX will have two components: a mobile application that will enable patients to track their daily activities using a smartphone and a web-based tool clinicians can use to access patient information to help inform treatment.

“We want to use technology to help patients in real time, during their daily activities, and also to enhance the effectiveness of the time they spend face-to-face with their physician or counselor,” Dr. Tulu said.

Using text inputs, barcode scanning, and GPS technology, the RELAX patient app will track eating patterns, daily activities, exercise, patient-mood, and stress inducing events. The app will provide the patient with an itemized list of foods consumed, indicate the times of day identified as high-stress moments, and illustrate the relationship between food intake and stress. The information collected will help the user to better understand his or her habits when it comes to emotional or stress eating.

For example, the patient-facing application will provide coaching for dietary choices or guided stress-reduction exercises to lessen the likelihood of overeating.

“Imagine a person driving into the parking lot of a fast-food restaurant, at a certain time of day, and getting prompted with a message asking them to think about what they are feeling and whether or not it is the right time to eat,” Tulu said.

Clinicians will be able to access their patients’ information collected through the RELAX patient app using the web-based application. The web tool will present information as easily digestible visual displays and feedback reports for the clinician to review.

Much of the time during traditional weight-loss counseling sessions is spent reviewing paper self-monitoring records and soliciting information from the patient about factors impacting their adherence, such as stress and stress eating. By using the RELAX web tool, clinicians can more quickly get to the heart of causal factors behind the patient’s eating habits, which can be difficult to identify using traditional counseling. The research team believes RELAX will help patients achieve better outcomes with fewer visits to their doctor or counselor.

The researchers hope the interactive design and the clinician’s ability to engage with the patient in a more data-rich way, both unique features of the RELAX application, will enable a more comprehensive approach to counseling patients about weight and stress management.

“We too often think of clinical problems in isolation and develop interventions focused on one problem,” Pagoto said. “The reality is that patients more often than not experience multiple issues that are very entangled. Just like clinical care, apps need to address the ‘whole patient’ to be maximally effective.”

RELAX is a three-year project. The first phase will establish the clinical and technical requirements for the mobile app and web-based tools. The second phase will cover technology development and usability analysis. The final phase will be a pilot clinical trial of the prototype RELAX applications with patients at UMMS and an analysis of the application’s impact on program delivery and costs.

“Part of our hypothesis is that the RELAX applications will result in a more cost-effective way to deliver this clinical program, so we also want to test that,” Tulu said. “The grant includes a rigorous business-case analysis of the prototype and pilot trial.”

RELAX is the latest in a series of collaborative research and development projects that blend the clinical and behavioral science expertise at UMMS with the engineering and computer science capabilities at WPI to help improve patient outcomes. Previous joint projects include development of a mobile application to promote weight management and a novel application and imaging system to help people with severe diabetes better manage their condition.

Also working on the RELAX program as co-investigators are UMMS faculty Edwin Boudreaux, PhD, professor of emergency medicine; James Carmody, PhD, associate professor of medicine; and Yunsheng Ma, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine. The WPI co-investigators are Emmanuel Agu, PhD, associate professor of computer science; and Justin Wang, PhD, assistant professor, WPI Foisie School of Business.

About Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Founded in 1865 in Worcester, Mass., WPI is one of the nation’s first engineering and technology universities. Its 14 academic departments offer more than 50 undergraduate and graduate degree programs in science, engineering, technology, business, the social sciences, and the humanities and arts, leading to bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees. WPI’s talented faculty work with students on interdisciplinary research that seeks solutions to important and socially relevant problems in fields as diverse as the life sciences and bioengineering, energy, information security, materials processing, and robotics. Students also have the opportunity to make a difference to communities and organizations around the world through the university’s innovative Global Perspective Program. There are more than 40 WPI project centers in the Americas, Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Europe.

About UMass Medical School

The University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS), one of five campuses of the University system, comprises of the School of Medicine, the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, the Graduate School of Nursing, a thriving research enterprise and an innovative public service initiative, Commonwealth Medicine. Its mission is to advance the health of the people of the commonwealth through pioneering education, research, public service and health care delivery with its clinical partner, UMass Memorial Health Care. In doing so, it has built a reputation as a world-class research institution and as a leader in primary care education. The Medical School attracts more than $ 240 million annually in research funding, placing it among the top 50 medical schools in the nation. In 2006, UMMS’s Craig C. Mello, PhD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and the Blais University Chair of Molecular Medicine, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, along with colleague Andrew Z. Fire, PhD, of Stanford University, for their discoveries related to RNA interference (RNAi). The 2013 opening of the Albert Sherman Center ushered in a new era of biomedical research and education on campus. Designed to maximize collaboration across fields, the Sherman Center is home to scientists pursing novel research in emerging scientific fields with the goal of translating new discoveries into innovative therapies for human diseases.

Contact:

Michael Cohen, WPI                            

508-868-4778                        

mcohen(at)wpi(dot)edu    

Megan Bard, UMMS

508.856.2296

megan(dot)bard(at)umassmed(dot)edu







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Mayo Clinic Study Confirms That Stress And Emotional Anxiety Can Raise Risk Of Surgical Complications


Beverly Hills, CA (PRWEB) December 01, 2014

In a recent Mayo Clinic study published in the Journal Of Gastrointestinal Surgery released in September 2014, researchers found that quality of life issues like family turmoil and secondary worries unrelated to the patient’s illness and upcoming surgery could increase the likelihood of suffering surgical complications. As a result, the study concluded that addressing stress and emotional anxiety prior to surgery should be a priority for a better surgical recovery.

“The results of the study are a welcome addition to the existing science on how stress and emotional well being affects the healing process,” said Koretz, who offers rejuvenation and luxury spa amenities in addition to medical after surgery care at Pearl Recovery Retreat.

Of the 431 patients observed, the study found that patients with lower quality of life indicators were as much as three times more likely to suffer post surgical complications. Some of the metrics used to measure a patient’s quality of life score and wellness include:

financial

spiritual

emotional

mental

social

Patients that felt anxiety or emotional distress over their needs not being met in any or a combination of the key quality of life indicators received a lower quality of life score, and were therefore at a higher risk for surgical complications.

Adding to the Mayo Clinic study’s findings, a study published in the November 2014 issue of Anesthesiology out of McGill University Health Centre in Montreal found that patients that underwent what they called “prehabilitation,” a course of conditioning, nutrition, and relaxation exercises prior to surgery showed greater progress in post-surgical rehabilitation.

“At Pearl Recovery Retreat, we’ve worked to design programs that help mitigate post-surgical complications and stress, and contribute to a healthy and speedy recovery for all of our patients,” added Koretz. “In addition to a surgical retreat, it’s a home away from home where patients can put their needs and well being first, for a safe and worry free recovery.”

Pearl Recovery Retreat is a surgical aftercare facility and wellness retreat in Beverly Hills, located within the 5-star SLS Hotel Beverly Hills. With professional nurses, luxurious rooms, and lavish amenities, Pearl offers post-surgical patients the opportunity to recover in a serene environment under the watchful eye of an experienced nursing staff. With their doctors’ approval, patients may check into Pearl after outpatient surgery, including cosmetic, gynecological, bariatric, orthopedic, sinus, and bunion procedures. Unlike other aftercare facilities, Pearl is centrally located within a short drive of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center as well as many of Beverly Hills’ top surgeons and doctors. Pearl offers an unparalleled array of recovery in-room amenities including gourmet dining options, spa services, and unrestricted visiting hours.