Archive for Seniors

Insanity Workout For Seniors?

A friend of mine recently burned his way through the Insanity Workout, a 60 day incredibly intense cardio workout that you do at home, and came out the other end lean and ripped. He loved it! He lost about twenty five pounds, and now he’s moving onto Tony Horton’s P90X. He loved it so much that he impressed his dad, who has since expressed an interest in doing the same thing. So my buddy came to me, and asked if it would be alright for his dad to do the workout. His dad is in his fifties, and my friend was worried that his dad would hurt himself. So I gave him all the advice I could, and then realized that it would make a good article for all those folks who are itching to do something extreme but aren’t sure if their bodies can take it. Can seniors do the Insanity Workout, or are they better off with something lighter?

The answer to this question revolves around a basic premise that is false: that we have to do the Insanity Workout at the same level of intensity that Shaun T, the instructor, is performing it at. People see how hard and how intensely Shaun T is working out at, how hard his backup workout trainees are going, and they think they think they have to perform at the same level, that if they’re not matching them push up for push up, they’re not doing the workout right.

False. Shaun T himself says over and over again that we should stop whenever our form begins to slide. Every break he tells us to check our heart rates and make sure we’re doing alright. He constantly tells us to stop if we’re struggling, and there is the key to doing the workout right. We’re not supposed to match him jumping jack for jumping jack, there is no absolutely necessary way to do the workout. As long as you exercise at your own personal best, you’re doing the workout right. Maybe that means simply going at half speed compared to the video, maybe that means taking four minute breaks instead of thirty second ones, maybe that means standing there gasping for air as you struggle to not quit and press stop.

Regardless, anybody can do this work out if they check their pride at the door and listen carefully to their bodies, going at the pace that is right for them.

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Anti Aging With The Right Exercise Program For Seniors

No matter what age group you fall into some sort of exercise is good for the body and mind. Some sort of exercise is going to help you stay young for a lot longer than if you did nothing at all. If you remain as active as you can you will discover the benefits to your health and it will give you a feeling of self fulfillment. If you want to stay fit you don’t even have to do any kind of overly strenuous exercise routines with all that exercise equipment you can find in the gym, you can just use some of your own items you have in your home.

A balance exercise will help you maintain your body’s balance and this will let you be able to move around with good confidence in yourself and body. You can stand up and then raise your arms out straight at your sides. Make sure your arms are at the height of your shoulders. Now, you will need to find a spot on a wall in front of you to focus on, a picture would be a good example of a focal point. When you focus on this, this will keep you steady when you walk. Next you will step slow while putting one of your feet right in front of the other one while your arms are held out at your sides. When you are taking your step make sure that your leg is lifted up slightly and then hold it for a short count of one and then take the next step. You can start this exercise with ten steps and then increase the amount of steps over time.

You should also include a flexibility exercise. You can do this one by standing up straight and then take hold of an end of a rope, a towel or even a belt, with your right hand. Now you will bend your arm and put the rope or towel over your right shoulder. After you have done that use your left hand and put it behind your back and get a hold of the other end of the towel or rope. Next just gently begin to stretch your right shoulder. You do this by pulling down on the rope with the left hand. You then need to let go and then tighten again for 3 to 5 times. After you have done this switch to the left shoulder and repeat the process.

A good strengthening exercise is the lunge. You will need to stand up and make sure that your legs are separated about the width of your shoulders. Make sure that your toes as well as your knees are pointing forward. Put your hands on your hips and do not lock your knees you can start with your right side first. With your right foot put it about 18 inches in front of you without letting your heel come off the floor. If you can’t do this, then make the step less than 18 inches. Now you will bend your knee just a little and then return to the standing. Do the same thing with your left leg. You should try to repeat these lunges five to 20 times for each leg.

Just doing these few exercises each day will help you stay fit and will give you a younger feeling each day. You will be amazed at just how little exercise at one time your body requires to be fit.

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Creating The Right Exercise Program : Activities For Seniors

Seniors need regular exercise to maintain muscle tone, boost stamina and gain independence. There are several other benefits that workouts turn into, that keep the elderly living longer and staying away from illness. You should draw the perfect exercise program that sufficiently suits their capacity and needs. Here are some tips to get your started.

What They Can Do

The primary rule is to only provide enough exercise that will stimulate adequate blood flow to all the vital organs, as well as maintain muscle mass. Muscle tends to atrophy during the later stages of a person’s life. You should keep hard-earned tissues through both cardiovascular exercises, stretching routines and weight training. In the beginning, it is important that you do an overall assessment of the senior citizen first, to ensure that he or she can do all the exercises without much trouble.

Very strenuous exercise can be detrimental to the overall condition of seniors. You need to check their response by listening to their verbalizations and observing how they cope. If you find some negative signs such as heavy breathing, profuse sweating, loss of balance, droopy eyelids and mild to severe pain, immediately stop the activity.

Being Flexible

Exercise routines should be individualized, which means that one program is only meant for a single individual. The specific approach is highly recommended since it takes away much of the risk of overtraining. You can also map out progress more efficiently by giving the exact type of exercises, number of repetitions and sets and duration of each workout. Use a log book and fill in all the details of every workout.

Exercise programs should be very flexible, in the sense that the routines and kinds of movements change every week or so, depending on the response of the patient. Your goal is to maintain or boost strength, flexibility and strength, if possible, so the exercises need to be upped as the individual gets stronger and better.

Getting a Professional

If you happen to be a concerned son or granddaughter taking care of a senior citizen in your home, it is always useful to get the opinion of a professional when creating your exercise plan, so you can select the right type and intensity that suit the needs of the patient. Professionals include dieticians, gym instructors, physical therapists, nutritionists, nurses and physicians who will check if the program is acceptable or too strenuous.

During the first few sessions, you can ask the professional to help you in assisting the senior go through the different movements. Proper execution is crucial to attain the various objectives and goals. Professional help is important every now and then, especially during the times when you’re already supposed to evaluate the senior’s response to treatment.

Other Sources

When defining the exercise routine, you can refer to exercise DVDs that caters to seniors, visit online forums and watch videos online. You can also visit senior centers to have an idea how a typical routine goes. Take some tips from instructors and the experts about evaluation and adjusting the routine for the patient. Over time, you will develop the skill in keeping the senior comfortable while giving him or her a truly sensible workout. Be reminded that diet and rest are the other two components that will sufficiently support the exercise program for seniors.

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MorseLifes New Memory Care Residence To Meet Service Gap In Caring for Seniors with Memory Impairment

West Palm Beach, Florida (PRWEB) June 12, 2015

Today, there are 5.3 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease and barring any medical breakthroughs to help prevent or cure the disease, that number will grow by 40% over the next ten years. In the State of Florida alone, there are 500,000 seniors living with Alzheimer’s disease and that figure will also grow by 44% by 2025.

In filling the service gap in Palm Beach County for seniors with both moderate and advanced memory impairment that comes with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia, MorseLife Health System has now opened its new Memory Care residence: a secure 53- apartment Assisted Living residence and separate 30-bed advanced memory care long-term care unit.

Stephen A. Levin, Chairman of MorseLife Health System, notes that this construction represents the third phase of the nonprofit senior care organization’s $ 150 million capital project that is funded in part by the Campaign to Transform MorseLife. This Campaign, which has raised nearly $ 30 million to date, has thus far resulted in the January 2014 opening of the Sondra and David S. Mack Pavilion for short-term rehabilitation and the November 2014 renovation of the Resnick Pavilion of the nursing home. The fourth phase, to break ground this summer, will be the construction of a 182-apartment independent living residence, The Tower at the Tradition.

Memory Care Residence has been built in the original Edwards Pavilion of the MorseLife nursing residence. The first two floors offer 52 secure studio apartments with expansive dining and living room areas, warm and inviting kitchen, gardens, as well as full service amenities and activities. This residence will have an on-site medical team led by a Harvard-trained geriatrician, nurse practitioners and visiting medical specialists; structured fitness programs; and innovative activities program designed to engage and stimulate residents. One of its more unique programs is Music & Memory, a program of personalized music on the Ipod which has shown to improve behavior and socialization and enhance cognition.

The third secure level of the building includes 30 long-term care beds for seniors with advanced memory impairment. A program staffed by medical and allied health professionals with extensive experience and training in caring for seniors with memory impairment, it will specialize in caring for residents with Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy Bodies Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, Huntington’s Disease, Wenicke-Korsakoff Syndrome and other memory loss disorders. The long-term unit will offer expansive dining and living areas, private rooms, amenities and innovative programs, including Music & Memory.

Keith Myers, President/CEO, notes that the vision for MorseLife Health System is a world without Alzheimer’s. “However, without medical advancements on the horizon leading to prevention or cure, we are only seeing greater demand in our County and in South Florida for seniors in both earlier and later stages of memory impairment,” he said. “In both residences, our focus will be on improved health and well-being, life enrichment, sense of security and peace, and peaceful living for residents.”

Myers notes that the goal of the professional teams running these residences is to help residents make the most of their lives through excellent medical care, comfortable environments and programs designed to build cognition and ensure more peaceful days. “We want to ensure better quality of life for seniors with memory impairment, and at the same time, ensure peace-of-mind of their family caregivers,” he said.

MorseLife Health System holds the 5-star quality rating from Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, as well as the Gold Seal Award from the Governor’s Panel on Excellence in Long-Term Care. MorseLife is also designated by the Florida State Legislature as a “Teaching Nursing Home,” one of two in the state, making it a coveted site for research and training of future physicians, nurses and allied health professionals.

For more information about MorseLife Health System’s Memory Care Assisted Living and its advanced memory care long-term unit, call (561) 687-5756.

About MorseLife

MorseLife is a nationally-recognized provider of exceptional care for seniors in Palm Beach County. A charitable, not-for-profit organization, its programs include short-term rehabilitation, long term care, independent and assisted living, Memory Care Assisted Living, home health care, meals-on-wheels, care management, Neighbor2Neighbor, and Palm Beach PACE. Founded 33 years ago, MorseLife has built a reputation and tradition of caring for seniors with excellence, dignity and compassion. For more information, visit http://www.morselife.org.







Seattle-area Seniors Show Great Interest in Naturopathic Solutions


SEATTLE (PRWEB) March 10, 2015

Bastyr University and Era Living are collaborating to enhance the health and well-being of older adults with a year of free workshop offerings at Era Living communities located throughout the Seattle metro-area.

Topics range from nutrition and supplementation to movement and alternative therapies to combat inflammation, stress, pain, moodiness, weigh issues and more with the desired result of a more educated older population.

“Part of the goal of naturopathic medicine is to prevent problems from happening before they start,” says Bastyr University President Daniel K. Church, PhD. “Studies have shown that by taking a proactive approach to one’s own health can lead to not only a longer life but one filled with better quality as well.”

This collaboration is savvy for both Era Living and Bastyr; seniors are the fastest growing segment of the American population, yet often have little knowledge of natural medicine and its benefits. Since the partnership began one year ago the presentations have been welcomed by seniors from throughout the Seattle area.

“Lectures by Bastyr professors at Era Living communities have received some of the highest attendance of all the classes offered as part of our lifelong learning program,” says Era Living Programs Development Manager, Tina Hall. “Era Living residents, their families, friends and neighbors all want to learn more about natural ways to be and stay healthy. Bastyr and its team of wellness focused practitioners are helping our residents feel great in mind, body and spirit.”

Dates, times, lecture titles and locations include:

Thursday, March 19, 10:30am – 12noon

Just Breathe (tips to reduce stress) with Dr. Brad Lichtenstein, ND, BCB

Ida Culver House Ravenna

2315 NE 65th Street

Seattle, WA 98115

RSVP: 206-523-7315

Friday, April 7, 2pm – 3:30pm    

Herbs for Immune Health with Dr. Natalie Walsh, ND, MS    

Aljoya Thornton Place

450 100th Street

Seattle, WA 98125

RSVP: 206-306-7920

Tuesday, May 5, 2pm – 3:30pm     

Better Health at Any Age (Say Yes – tips for better nutrition and exercise) with Dr. June Kloubec, PhD

Aljoya Thornton Place

450 100th Street

Seattle, WA 98125

RSVP: 206-306-7920

Tuesday, September 15, 2pm – 3:30pm

Survivor Nutrition (tips for diabetics, cancer survivors, kidney health) with Kelly Morrow, MS, RD, CD    

Ida Culver House Broadview

12505 Greenwood Ave. N.

Seattle WA 98133

RSVP: 206-361-1989

Thursday, October 15, 2pm – 3:30pm

Acupuncture for Aching Joints with Dr. Kathleen Lumiere, LAOM, MAc, LAc

Ida Culver House Broadview

12505 Greenwood Ave. N.

Seattle WA 98133

RSVP: 206-361-1989

Tuesday, November 3

Survivor Nutrition (tips for diabetics, cancer survivors, kidney health) with Kelly Morrow, MS, RD, CD    

University House Wallingford

4400 N. Stone Way

Seattle, WA 98103

RSVP: 206-545-8400

Tuesday, December 8, 10:30am – 12noon

Just Breathe (tips to reduce stress) with Dr. Brad Lichtenstein, ND, BCB

University House Wallingford

4400 N. Stone Way

Seattle, WA 98103

RSVP: 206-545-8400

Since 1987, Era Living has been dedicated to fostering a healthy and engaging environment of whole body wellness, culture, warmth, and social fulfillment – providing premier healthcare services and enriching activities at all eight of its communities. Era Living communities are Aljoya Mercer Island, Aljoya Thornton Place, Ida Culver House Broadview, Ida Culver House Ravenna, The Gardens at Town Square, The Lakeshore, University House Issaquah, and University House Wallingford.

Bastyr University is internationally recognized as a pioneer in natural medicine. As the largest accredited university for natural health arts and sciences in the U.S., Bastyr’s campus located near Seattle, Washington, offers more than 17 degree and certificate programs in fields such as naturopathic medicine, acupuncture and Oriental medicine, and whole-food nutrition. Founded in 1978, the University now includes a leading-edge research facility (the Bastyr University Research Institute) and outstanding clinical training at Bastyr Center for Natural Health, ranked as one of the Puget Sound’s top medical facilities for patient experience in 2013. The University’s second campus, Bastyr University California opened in San Diego, in fall 2012, becoming California’s first and only accredited school of naturopathic medicine.

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Related Exercise Program Press Releases

Designing Successful Aquatics Programs for Seniors Topic of HydroWorx Webinar


Middletown, PA (PRWEB) February 20, 2015

Turning 65, 75 or even 85 is different for individuals today than it was only one or two generations ago. After all, it’s no longer uncommon to find seniors in the gym, on the track or on the court. In fact, aging in America can now be referred to as “active aging” thanks to the desire for individuals to stay healthy as long as possible. Of course, the normal process of getting older can make it increasingly difficult to engage in a variety of athletic pursuits, especially those that jar the joints, or put stressors on the upper or lower extremities. Yet for most people who crave the opportunity to freely move their bodies, giving up the pleasure of working out is not an option; instead, they seek out alternative methods such as aquatic programs where they can get all the benefits of regular exercise without the risk of injuries, increased pain or falling.

A webinar-based discussion of this topic, “Road Map to Creating a Successful Aquatics Program for Seniors”, will be offered by HydroWorx, the leading provider of therapy pools, on Tuesday, February 24, from 1-2 p.m. E.S.T. Presented by Rachel McDermott, PTA, former Director of Rehabilitation, and Paul Osterberger, Wellness Director, of Stonehill Care Center in Dubuque, Iowa, the one-hour event will cover a variety of topics including:


The successes of Stonehill Care Center’s aquatic therapy program for their senior living wellness and therapy center residents and clients.
Strategies for starting and continuing an aquatic-focused therapy and wellness program, including marketing tips and techniques to increase community engagement.
Methods to improve the return on investment of an aquatic therapy pool.

Both speakers have extensive backgrounds making them well-suited to explore this discussion with attendees. McDermott has been a director at multiple clinics, where she has continuously been able to utilize her training in nursing rehabilitation and aquatic therapy. She has been the Director of Rehabilitation at Stonehill Care Center for the last 5 years. She recently made the transition to Unity Point Hospital and is now the Director of their Acute Rehab Unit. Osterberger develops all-inclusive programming for fitness classes and workshops to enrich the lives of the members at Stonehill Care Center. Her professional degrees and experiences are in recreation management, health and wellness and mass communications.

Attendance for “Road Map to Creating a Successful Aquatics Program for Seniors” is free, but registration is required prior to the start time. Registration can be made at http://ww2.hydroworx.com/webinar-aquatics-seniors.

About HydroWorx®

Since the late 1990s, HydroWorx has manufactured aquatic therapy pools with built-in underwater treadmills to enable clinicians to more effectively offer their patients the opportunity to increase range of motion, decrease risk of falls and joint stress and remain motivated through the rehab process.

Products such as the HydroWorx 2000 and 500 Series therapy pools have revolutionized the face of aquatic therapy; in fact, HydroWorx technology is used by world-class facilities like the renowned Kennedy Krieger Institute and The Andrews Institute, as well as physical therapy clinics across the country.

HydroWorx offers a wide range of underwater treadmill pools and peripheral products and services. Every day, more than 23,000 athletes and patients use HydroWorx technology to recover from injuries and health conditions.

More information about HydroWorx can be found at http://www.hydroworx.com.







Jewish Community Housing Corporation of Metropolitan New Jersey Offers Helpful Winter Safety Tips for Seniors

West Orange, N.J. (PRWEB) January 28, 2015

The winter season can present serious challenges to older adults in many parts of the country, whether they live in a private home, apartment, or in a retirement community. The Jewish Community Housing Corporation of Metropolitan New Jersey (JCHC), which owns and manages four senior living communities in northern New Jersey, advises seniors to take additional steps to stay safe during the colder months.

“We take extra precautions during the winter months to ensure our senior residents remain safe, warm and secure,” said Terrence Roselle, the JCHC’s Regional Facilities Director. “Measures in all four of our communities are executed to meet the demands of rough winter weather, when we must contend with near-freezing or below-freezing cold temperatures, ice and snow, and when our seniors must often spend extended periods of time indoors.”

Aside from timely snow and ice removal from all public walkway and the parking lot, Roselle noted that the JCHC offers transportation for residents to area shopping destinations and for cultural outings, and maintains appropriate indoor temperatures to keep residents warm and comfortable. Standby generators are being installed in case of a power outage and emergency protocols are in place in all four JCHC communities.

“After Superstorm Sandy, we held organization-wide programs called ‘JCHC Strong’ in all four of our communities, to educate residents on how to better prepare for extended power outages and weather emergencies,” said Roselle, who heads up the JCHC’s emergency planning task force.

The JCHC offers these helpful tips for seniors, their families, and caregivers to keep elderly or frail individuals safe and healthy during the winter, and to prevent common hazards of the season.

    Prevent unnecessary slips and falls. Older adults are particularly vulnerable to broken wrists, ankles or hips, and could suffer severe lacerations to their head or face in the events of a slip and fall.
o    Keep walkways clear of ice and snow. Have a reliable snow shoveling service lined up in advance of bad weather and adequate ice melt product on hand for steps and sidewalks.

o    Maintain good traction. Wear shoes with non-skid soles and replace worn cane tips. Remove shoes indoors to avoid tracking in melting snow and ice that can lead to dangerously slippery floors.

    Avoid frostbite or hypothermia.
o    Dress warmly in layers. According to the National Institutes of Health, hypothermia can develop in older adults after relatively short exposure to cold weather; therefore, dress warmly when going outdoors, keep extremities warm, and add hat, scarf, and gloves.

o    Keep indoor temperature warm enough. Don’t set the thermostat too low and keep extra blankets on hand for chilly nights in order to maintain proper body temperature.

    Prepare the car—and driver—for winter driving. Cold weather is no time for roadside breakdowns or stalled vehicles. Have the car serviced before deep winter hits and have all systems checked to stay safe on the road. Sign up for a roadside assistance program and keep a cell phone charged and on hand for emergencies. Avoid driving in hazardous conditions.
    Eat well and take Vitamin D. A varied, nutritional diet is always important at any age. However, less time spent outdoors in direct sunlight means less Vitamin D which is essential for healthy bones and teeth. Add supplementation to the diet and/or include grains, tuna and salmon, and fortified milk to avoid Vitamin D deficiency.
    Install a carbon dioxide monitor. Using a fireplace, gas heater or lanterns can lead to carbon dioxide poisoning if rooms are not properly ventilated. A carbon dioxide detector is an easy way to avoid this dangerous situation.
    Have an emergency kit. Be prepared for an extended power outage with a flashlight (and fresh batteries), warm blankets, non-perishable foods, a cell phone and charger, and a battery-powered radio. Have a family communication plan in place to check on each other.
    Stay in touch with loved ones. The winter can be tough on some people because they are indoors so much and they might be more isolated than usual. It’s a good idea for families to check in on their loved ones more frequently, not only to make sure they are doing well physically and emotionally.

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About the Jewish Community Housing Corporation of Metropolitan New Jersey

Founded in 1982, the Jewish Community Housing Corporation of Metropolitan New Jersey (JCHC) developed and manages more than 470 apartments in four buildings for older adults in Morris and Essex counties in northern New Jersey. The non-profit organization offers seniors a range of options in terms of services, amenities, location, and cost, all within a traditional Jewish environment. The JCHC provides housing, programs, and services for the independent elderly as well as those who need assisted living. For more information, go to http://www.jchcorp.org







Senior exercise routine. Easy to follow fitness workout program for active adults & seniors 55+.

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Total Body Weight Loss Workout Level 1 (Calisthenics) from BeFit in 30 Extreme is an explosive, total body-conditioning workout that combines metabolism-boosting cardio moves with full body-toning…

Activities For Seniors & Exercise Programs

Seniors need regular exercise to maintain muscle tone, boost endurance and gain independence. There are several other benefits that workouts render, that keep the elderly living longer and staying away from disease. You should draw the perfect exercise program that adequately suits their capacity and needs. Here are some tips to get your started.

What They Can Do

The primary rule is to only provide enough exercise that will stimulate adequate blood flow to all the vital organs, as well as maintain muscle mass. Muscle tends to atrophy during the later stages of a person’s life. You should keep hard-earned tissues through both cardiovascular exercises, stretching routines and weight training. In the beginning, it is important that you do an overall assessment of the elder citizen first, to ensure that he or she can do all the exercises without much trouble.

Very strenuous exercise can be detrimental to the overall condition of elders. You need to check their response by listening to their verbalizations and observing how they cope. If you find some negative signs such as heavy breathing, profuse sweating, loss of balance, droopy eyelids and mild to severe pain, immediately stop the activity.

Being Flexible

Exercise routines should be individualized, which means that one program is only meant for a single individual. The specific approach is highly recommended since it takes away much of the risk of overtraining. You can also map out progress more efficiently by giving the exact type of exercises, number of repetitions and sets and duration of each workout. Use a log book and fill in all the details of every workout.

Exercise programs should be very flexible, in the sense that the routines and kinds of movements change every week or so, depending on the response of the patient. Your goal is to maintain or boost strength, flexibility and strength, if possible, so the exercises need to be upped as the individual gets stronger and better.

Getting a Professional

If you happen to be a concerned son or granddaughter taking care of a older person in your home, it is always useful to get the opinion of a professional when creating your exercise plan, so you can select the right type and intensity that suit the needs of the patient. Professionals include dieticians, gym instructors, physical therapists, nutritionists, nurses and physicians who will check if the program is acceptable or too strenuous.

During the first few sessions, you can ask the professional to help you in assisting the aged individual go through the different movements. Proper execution is crucial to attain the various objectives and goals. Professional help is important every now and then, especially during the times when you’re already supposed to evaluate the senior’s response to treatment.

Other Sources

When defining the exercise routine, you can refer to exercise DVDs that caters to seniors, visit online forums and watch videos online. You can also visit senior centers to have an idea how a typical routine goes. Take some tips from instructors and the experts about evaluation and adjusting the routine for the patient. Over time, you will develop the skill in keeping the senior comfortable while giving him or her a truly sensible workout. Be reminded that diet and rest are the other two components that will sufficiently support the exercise program for elders.

For more on possible elderly activities – visit : golfing lessons online & boating and yachting & also horse training techniques

Balance Exercises for Seniors – Stronger Seniors Chair Exercise Program

http://www.StrongerSeniors.com From the Stronger Seniors Chair Exercise DVD, ‘Strength’ Working the various muscles, joints, and tendons that are key to main…
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http://www.passion4profession.net PRESENTS: 8 Min Abs Workout, how to have six pack. The workout has been designed to specifically work on the abdominal area…
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