Archive for Research

New Research Shows 70% Of Dog Owners Unaware Of Potentially Harmful Ingredients In Dog Food


Seattle, WA (PRWEB) May 20, 2015

Kidney failure. Allergies. Obesity. Death. These are some results of dogs consuming commercial dog food with poor ingredients. Now, new research also shows that over 70% of dog owners don’t know or don’t care about all the ingredients in their dog’s food. Nearly 20 percent of dog owners “don’t know any of the ingredients” in the food they feed their dog. Seems pretty dangerous, right?

The discovery of toxic substances and poor manufacturing processes over the past 15 years was only the beginning. Today, many dogs are still being fed unhealthy dog food that is filled with harmful, low-quality ingredients, like preservatives, grain fillers, “dry rendered tankage,” and even other dead pets (yes, that is true).

During an extensive process spanning two months, the Reviews.com team collected proprietary data from research, surveys, expert inputs, and reviewed over 2,000 formulations with the goal of uncovering the truth and raising awareness around the issue.

Here are some of the highlights from the research, including commentary from some top contributors to the project:

–There are specific ingredients found in many dog foods to avoid. “Dogs don’t digest corn well, if at all. Wheat, Soy, and Beet Pulp should also be avoided,” says author and lecturer, Darlene Arden.

–Many popular ingredients lead to allergies, digestive problems, obesity, and even behavior issues. “If not healthy and feeling good the dog cannot focus or concentrate. Plus if [the] dog is not fed correctly it can result in physical defects which affect temperament,” says long-time dog trainer, Martin Deeley.

–Some believe in a raw-only diet to control every substance their pet consumes, while others feed a commercial diet. However, every expert agrees on quality ingredients.

–There is an over-saturation of the market. “Personally I feel there’s so much choice nowadays it’s a huge pressure on dog owners to make that important decision,” says TV veterinarian, Marc Abraham.

To see other important findings and a list of approved, healthy choices, check out the full Reviews.com dog food article.







Okayama University research: Enzyme-inhibitors treat drug-resistant epilepsy


Okayama, Japan (PRWEB UK) 27 April 2015

One percent of the world’s population suffer from epilepsy, and a third of sufferers cannot be treated with antiepileptic drugs. Diet control has been used to treat patients suffering from drug-resistant epilepsy since the 1920s, but how metabolic processes affect epilepsy has not been fully understood. Now researchers at Okayama University and Kawasaki Medical School have identified the metabolic pathways altered by diet treatments, the enzymes that can control them and potential metabolic drugs that may be effective for treating types of epilepsy that are resistant to other drugs.

‘Ketogenic’ diets used to treat epilepsy are high in fat and low in carbohydrate. Due to the scarcity of glucose available as a result, the brain metabolises ketones, which uses a different metabolic pathway.

Tsuyoshi Inoue and his team examined neural cells in an artificial cerebrospinal fluid solution switched from glucose to ketones. When glucose was switched to ketones the cells became hyperpolarized – a change in the cell’s membrane potential that makes neurons less prone to becoming excited and active.

The researchers further broke down the processes in the metabolism of glucose and identified a crucial enzyme – lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Blocking LDH mimicked the switch from glucose to ketones in vitro. Further in vivo tests on mice confirmed the effect.

By testing the drugs already in use they identified LDH inhibitory action in stiripentol, a drug used for a rare form of the epilepsy. By modifying its chemical structure, they found an alternative LDH inhibitor with a similar structure that was more effective for in vivo tests on mice. They conclude, “Our study opens a realistic path to develop compounds for drug-resistant epilepsy by targeting LDH enzymes with stiripentol derivatives.”

Background

Epilepsy

Epilepsy describes the neurological disorder that results in seizures that have no other known cause. The seizures result from excessive excitation in the cortical nerve in the brain and the length and severity of the seizures may vary.

The transmission of signals by neurons relies on the rapid rise and fall of the membrane potential, and is affected by cell polarization. When the cell membrane becomes hyperpolarized, a greater stimulus is required to produce an action potential. As a result hyperpolarization can prevent the excessive cortical activity that causes epileptic seizures.

Glucose and ketone metabolic pathways

Ketones directly activate the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle that generates energy in aerobic respiration. In contrast glucose and lactate are converted to pyruvate in glycolysis, which are then used as the main input and intermediates of the TCA cycle.

The researchers studied the activity of neural cells from the basal ganglia – a region of the brain that is important for the propagation of seizures – in artificial cerebrospinal fluid in vitro. They found that the replacement of glucose with ketones led to hyperpolarization of the cell membrane. The hyperpolarization was recovered by the addition of lactate, suggesting that inhibitors of the enzyme LDH – which catalyses the conversion of lactate into pyruvate – may have the same effect on epilepsy as ketogenic diets.

Stiripentol and analog

Stiripentol is an antiepileptic drug found to be effective for a particular type of epilepsy, Dravet syndrome. The chemical structure of stiripentol differs to most antiepileptic drugs, prompting the researchers to explore other chemicals with a similar structure that have LDH inhibiting and antiepileptic actions.

Isosafrole has a similar structure to stiripentol but with certain parts of the chemical structure absent (i.e. the hydroxyl and tertiary-butyl groups). The researchers found that isosafrole strongly inhibited LDH and suppressed signs of seizure such as spontaneous high voltage spikes and paroxysmal discharges in mice tests. The results suggest that LDH inhibitors may be effective for types of epilepsy that cannot be treated with traditional drugs.

Reference

Nagisa Sada, Suni Lee, Takashi Katsu, Takemi Otsuki, Tsuyoshi Inoue. Targeting LDH Enzymes with a Stiripentol Analog to Treat Epilepsy. Science (March 20, 2015) Vol. 347 no. 6228 pp. 1362-1367

DOI: 10.1126/science.aaa1299

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25792327

<Archive of Okayama University Research Updates>

Vol.1:Innovative non-invasive ‘liquid biopsy’ method to capture circulating tumor cells from blood samples for genetic testing

Vol.2:Ensuring a cool recovery from cardiac arrest

Vol.3:Organ regeneration research leaps forward

Vol.4:Cardiac mechanosensitive integrator

Vol.5:Cell injections get to the heart of congenital defects

Vol.6:Fourth key molecule identified in bone development

Vol.7:Anticancer virus solution provides an alternative to surgery

Vol.8:Light-responsive dye stimulates sight in genetically blind patients

Vol.9:Studies reveal how a diabetes drug helps towards the rejection of tumours by supporting immune cells

http://www.okayama-u.ac.jp/en/tp/release/release_id282.html

Further information

Okayama University

1-1-1 Tsushima-naka , Kita-ku , Okayama 700-8530, Japan

Planning and Public Information Division, Okayama University

E-mail: www-adm@adm.okayama-u.ac.jp

Website: http://www.okayama-u.ac.jp/index_e.html

Okayama Univ. e-Bulletin: http://www.okayama-u.ac.jp/user/kouhou/ebulletin/

About Okayama University (You Tube):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDL1coqPRYI

About Okayama University

Okayama University is one of the largest comprehensive universities in Japan with roots going back to the Medical Education House sponsored by the Lord of Okayama and established in 1870. Now with 1,300 faculty and 14,000 students, the University offers courses in specialties ranging from medicine and pharmacy to humanities and physical sciences. Okayama University is located in the heart of Japan approximately 3 hours west of Tokyo by Shinkansen.







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Airelle Skincare to kick off “Brave & Beauty” Event Series Spring 2015 in support of Breast Cancer Research at John Wayne Cancer Center

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) May 13, 2015

This invite only event series is designed to raise awareness about the ingredients people use on their skin and in their bodies. Each event will include the following informational topics, activities and more:


Eating and using fresh and organic ingredients
The power of cancer-fighting antioxidants.
The importance of quality skin care ingredients.
Free mini facials provided by expert celebrity aestheticians.
Product giveaways and discount package offers.

“It is an honor to support the world-renowned researchers at the John Wayne Cancer Institute Center. The Institute is truly a cutting edge facility research center. I hope that our collaboration with health, beauty, and wellness enthusiasts in support of the Institute encourages healthy living and helps people to make healthy lifestyle choices.” said Airelle Skin Co-Founder Kasey D’Amato.

The Brave & Beauty Event Series will start May 18th at Framed Salon in Santa Monica, CA from 7pm-9pm. The next event will be at Revolution Fitness in Santa Monica, CA May 28th and May 29th from 9am-11am! The Event Series will continue until the end of June.

Airelle™ Skincare, LLC is a company that produces high quality natural anti-aging skin care. The Airelle™ Skincare photoprotective philosophy of skin care is a result of innovative ideas from its two founders; a television first assistant director and his wife, an aesthetic dermatology physician assistant. The two collaborated with leading dermatologists from around the world to develop a modern product line that helps slow the aging process through unique photo protective science. Airelle™ Skincare is a living testament to the unique collaboration of Hollywood and science, as well as the founders’ passion for helping people protect and beautify their skin.







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National Multiple Sclerosis Society Invests $28 Million in New Research to Stop Multiple Sclerosis, Restore Function and End MS Forever


NEW YORK, NY (PRWEB) April 08, 2015

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has committed $ 28 million to support an expected 84 new MS research projects and training awards. These are part of a comprehensive research strategy aimed at stopping MS, restoring function that has been lost, and ending the disease forever – for every single person with MS.

This financial commitment is the latest in the Society’s relentless research efforts to move us closer to a world free of MS, and part of a projected investment of over $ 52 million in 2015 alone to support 380 new and ongoing studies around the world. So that no opportunity is wasted, the Society pursues all promising paths, while focusing on priority areas including progressive MS, nervous system repair, gene/environmental risk factors and wellness and lifestyle.

Just a few of the new cutting-edge research projects include a University of California, San Francisco-led consortium focusing on a comprehensive analysis of the gut microbiome to develop probiotic strategies for stopping progressive MS; a pilot trial at Johns Hopkins University exploring the tolerability of a diet that intermittently restricts calorie intake as a treatment for disease activity in people with MS; pre-clinical studies by a commercial firm (Bionure) to test the potential of a compound to protect the nervous system and stimulate repair of nerve-insulating myelin; and a new collaborative center at Oregon Health & Science University to research patient-centered wellness programs to improve the daily life of people with MS.

“These innovative new projects add to the Society’s comprehensive efforts to stop MS, restore function and end MS forever,” notes Bruce Bebo, PhD, National MS Society’s Executive Vice President, Research. “While we fund more research than any other MS organization in the world, we also convene and empower the research community toward breakthroughs that can help people with MS live their best lives now.”

Multiple sclerosis interrupts the flow of information within the brain and between the brain and the body. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. Worldwide, over 2.3 million people live with the unpredictable challenges of multiple sclerosis.

“MS research is a top National MS Society priority, with increasing annual investments to drive solutions for every person with MS,” says Cynthia Zagieboylo, President and CEO of the Society. “We fund the entire research spectrum, propelling novel ideas into the lab, translating breakthroughs into clinical trials, and moving success in clinical trials into new treatments for people living with MS.”

To find the best research with the most promise, the National MS Society relies on more than 130 world-class scientists who volunteer their time to carefully evaluate hundreds of proposals every year. This rigorous evaluation process assures that Society funds fuel research that delivers results in the shortest time possible.

There are FDA-approved therapies that can impact the underlying disease course in people with the more common forms of MS. However, none of these can stop progression or reverse the damage to restore function. National MS Society-funded research paved the way for existing therapies – none of which existed just several decades ago – and continues to be a driving force of MS research.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million worldwide.

About the National Multiple Sclerosis Society

The Society mobilizes people and resources to drive research for a cure and to address the challenges of everyone affected by MS. To fulfill this mission, the Society funds cutting-edge research, drives change through advocacy, facilitates professional education, collaborates with MS organizations around the world, and provides programs and services designed to help people with MS and their families move their lives forward. To move us closer to creating a world free of MS, last year alone, the Society invested $ 50.2 million to support more than 380 new and ongoing research projects around the world while providing program services to over one million people. Join the movement at nationalMSsociety.org.







Ohio State Newark’s Student Research Forum Winners Announced


Newark, Ohio (PRWEB) March 26, 2015

In its 11th year at The Ohio State University at Newark, the Student Research Forum showcased oral and poster presentations from 25 students in the John Gilbert Reese Center.

“This was a wonderful opportunity for the campus and the community to see some of our best and brightest,” says Dr. Nathaniel Swigger, Assistant Professor and co-organizer of the event. Adding, “In the end it’s all about our hard-working students presenting their research accomplishments.”

Student participants gave poster presentations as well oral presentations followed by question and answer sessions. Both were judged in separate categories divided between students presenting completed research and students who are proposing research topics.

The full list of winners and participants follows.

Oral Presentation, Completed Research:

Wesley Barnhart and Samuel Rivera, “Auditory Stimuli Slow Down Responses and First Fixations: Support for Auditory Dominance”

Carolyn Dunifon, “Heart Rate Variability Associated with Attentional Control in High-Load Flanker Tasks” (1st place)

Chelsea Hinshaw, “Mysterious Bones: The Key to Unlocking New Orleans’ Odd Fellows Rest”

Amanda Hunt, “Adolescent Literature for Young Adults vs. for Adults” (2nd place)

Bryce Jones, “Intellectuals and Zombies in Star Wars: Death Troopers”

Oral Presentation, Proposed Research:

Torah Silvera, “Mardi Gras Indians: Exploring the Intersection of History, Community, and Culture in a Unique Tradition” (2nd place)

Lenise Sunnenberg, “New Orleans’ Mardi Gras Indian Queens: Exploring the Intersection of Race, Gender and Culture in a Unique Tradition”

Ashley Theodore, “Maintaining Black Culture through Mardi Gras Indian Suits” (1st place)

Poster Presentation, Completed Research:

Wesley Barnhart, “The Effects of Math Anxiety on Behavioral Decision Making Tasks”

Wyatt Bowman, “The Perception of Research Quality Based on Institutional Esteem”

Robert Burkhart, “Testing the Utility of Stable Isotopes for Analyzing Bee Foraging Across Habitats”

Krysten R. Chadwick, “Prosodic Processing by Individuals with Williams Syndrome” (1st place)

Rebekah Clark, “The Effects of Simulated ADHD Symptoms on Cognition”

Carolyn Dunifon, “Pay Attention to the Pictures: Auditory Dominance Not Under Attentional Control”

Max Frankenberry, “Utility of Carbon 13 Isotopes for Determining Adult Bumblebee Diets”

Kayla Palmiter, “Cross-Domain Priming of Language and Music in Children”

Lindsey Rike, “The Cross-Domain Priming of Language and Motor Rate” (2nd place)

Andrew Sabula, “An Archaic Ungulate of Middle Paleocene Age from Southeast Montana”

Poster Presentation, Proposed Research:

Emily Fischer, “Is it a Bat or a Bat? How Preschoolers Use Prosody to Disambiguate Nouns”

Steven Foley, “Pre-Katrina vs. After Katrina: N’awlins Does Matter”

Austin Hulse, “Spectral Lags of Swift Gamma-Ray Bursts with Precursor Emission” (2nd place)

Ashley Luu and Cody Price, “Providing Unique Information May Lead to Being Ostracized”

Michael Madson, “Spectral Lags of Swift GRBs with Prompt Optical Emission” (1st place)

Brandon Porter, “The Effect of Prosody on Decision Making”

K’ree Wright, “Using Prosody to Predict a Credible Source”

To learn more about the Student Research Forum or about student research at Ohio State Newark, contact Nathaniel Swigger, Assistant Professor, Political Science at swigger.1(at)osu(dot)edu.

                                                                                                                ###

PHOTO Attached – Dr. Robert Cook congratulates a student winner at the 2015 Student Research Forum







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Sandwich and Sub Store Franchises in the US Industry Market Research Report from IBISWorld Has Been Updated


New York, NY (PRWEB) February 11, 2015

The Sandwich and Sub Store Franchises industry has experienced consistent growth in line with the economic recovery. Industry revenue grew in 2011 as consumer confidence and spending rebounded from the recession, in part due to Subway’s success with the Five Dollar Footlong promotion. Franchisees managed to maintain that momentum during the following years by developing new menu options that capitalize on society’s increasing awareness of the health risks associated with a high-fat diet. As a result, the industry has been able to thrive, despite rapidly evolving consumer preferences for fast food, which have led to the stagnation and decline of other quick-service restaurants. During the five years to 2015, IBISWorld expects industry revenue to grow, including an increase this year.

Sandwich and sub store franchises exist within the quick-service restaurant sector, which has traditionally been dominated by fast-food giants, such as McDonald’s and Burger King. Nevertheless, these restaurants have been rocked in recent years by the rapidly evolving tastes of a new generation of consumers. According to IBISWorld Industry Analyst Will McKitterick, “millennials have turned increasingly to fast-casual restaurants to satisfy their hunger when dining out.” This means companies like Chipotle and Shake Shack have begun to usurp market share from some of the fast-food segment’s most important players, such as McDonald’s. Unlike other fast-food giants, most sandwich and sub store franchises have been able to thrive within this highly competitive environment by catering to consumers’ health and wellness concerns. For example, Subway is well known for its low-calorie menu options, which it spent a number of years developing. By advertising the healthful nature of their products, many sandwich franchises avoided the declines that the rest of the quick-service segment experienced during the period.

“In the coming years, industry operators will continue to face stiff external competition from members of the fast-casual food segment,” says McKitterick. In turn, many sandwich franchises will continue to expand their menu options to include a wider variety of healthy food options. For example, in 2010, Subway added breakfast items to their menu, and in 2011, it introduced Subway Cafes, which offer coffee, paninis, muffins and other pastries. Over the five years to 2020, these trends are expected to contribute to revenue growth.

For more information, visit IBISWorld’s Sandwich and Sub Store Franchises in the US industry report page.

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IBISWorld industry Report Key Topics

The Sandwich and Sub Store Franchises industry comprises franchise establishments that prepare and serve custom sandwiches and subs. Reports in our Business Franchise collection focus solely on the operation of franchised outlets and exclude nonfranchise data. They show the total number of franchise outlets, franchise network-sales (revenue) and the average profit margin earned by franchisees. Our reports also highlight the largest franchisors by market share.

Industry Performance

Executive Summary

Key External Drivers

Current Performance

Industry Outlook

Industry Life Cycle

Products & Markets

Supply Chain

Products & Services

Major Markets

Globalization & Trade

Business Locations

Competitive Landscape

Market Share Concentration

Key Success Factors

Cost Structure Benchmarks

Barriers to Entry

Major Companies

Operating Conditions

Capital Intensity

Key Statistics

Industry Data

Annual Change

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About IBISWorld Inc.

Recognized as the nation’s most trusted independent source of industry and market research, IBISWorld offers a comprehensive database of unique information and analysis on every US industry. With an extensive online portfolio, valued for its depth and scope, the company equips clients with the insight necessary to make better business decisions. Headquartered in Los Angeles, IBISWorld serves a range of business, professional service and government organizations through more than 10 locations worldwide. For more information, visit http://www.ibisworld.com or call 1-800-330-3772.







Pediatric Research Conference on Food, Environment, and Childrens Health Set to Convene in Austin, TX


Austin, Texas (PRWEB) February 03, 2015

The Children’s Environmental Health Network (CEHN) is hosting a research conference titled: “Children: Food and Environment” in Austin, Texas from February 4th-6th, 2015. This conference will begin with a welcome address from the newly elected Austin Mayor, Mr. Steve Adler. CEHN is honored to have Mayor Adler, an advocate for the environment and for children, welcome conference participants to this exciting conference. Following the Mayor’s welcome will be an opening keynote address by Dr. Bruce Lanphear of Simon Fraser University and BC Children’s Hospital titled “Food in the Industrial Era: Is Backward the Way Forward?”

CEHN will also screen the documentary “Food Chains” as part of the conference opening, a film focusing on a group of tomato pickers from Southern Florida who are working to revolutionize farm labor. While focusing on farm worker injustices, the film provides an excellent bridge to the conference program by reflecting on how our entire food production system, from farm to table, touches the health of children, whether children of farm workers or consumers. Cutting edge research on topics ranging from how the interactions of food and the environment impact children’s health and development, including childhood obesity, neurodevelopment, and respiratory development will be presented over the following two days. There will be eight concurrent sessions with a total of 28 speakers, as well as two poster presentation sessions. CEHN’s Executive Director, Nsedu Obot Witherspoon, stated: “CEHN is thrilled to bring our latest pediatric research conference to Austin, TX and we look forward to over two days of science discussions around how the intersections of food and environmental factors affect the development of our children. The public health and policy implications to the related science will also be discussed in this unique forum.” To see the full conference schedule, visit: http://www.cehn.org/files/whole_schedule%202-2.pdf.

Keynote speakers include Dr. Erin Hager from the University of Maryland on how home and school environments predict children’s dietary choices; Dr. Lita Proctor, the director of the NIH Human Microbiome Project, who will speak on what the human microbiome is and its importance; Dr. Susan Smith from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who will address the challenges of food, toxicants, and perinatal influences; and Dr. Gregory Diette from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health on the prevention and treatment of asthma with diet. Expert panelists will discuss the policy and regulatory implications of this research. David Wallinga from Healthy Food Action will moderate a panel including Dr. William Dietz and Dr. Lance Price from George Washington University on how to navigate science and policy in a complex food environment, and Nsedu Obot Witherspoon from CEHN will moderate a panel on how to overcome barriers to promoting healthy development, which is comprised of Dr. Ruth Etzel, Director of the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Children’s Health Protection, Dr. William Suk from the National Institute of Environmental of Health Sciences, and Erik Olson from the Natural Resources Defense Council.

To showcase two programs doing excellent work with youth, food, and environmental sustainability in Austin, conference attendees will be visiting two Austin-based sustainable food programs as part of the conference, Urban Roots and the Sustainable Food Center.

To find out more about the conference and to register, visit: http://www.cehn.org/2015_research_conference.







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Interior Design Services Procurement Category Market Research Report from IBISWorld has Been Updated


Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) January 22, 2015

Interior design services have a buyer power score of 3.3 out of 5, indicating market conditions that are somewhat favorable for buyers. Low market share concentration, which has fueled competition among suppliers, combined with moderate product specialization and low supply chain risk has worked in favor of buyers. “With a wide selection of suppliers available, no vendor accounts for a substantial portion of market share, and buyers can pit suppliers against one another to obtain the best pricing,” says IBISWorld procurement analyst Kiera Outlaw. “Moreover, the large pool of available suppliers keeps product specialization at a moderate level, which also benefits buyers.” Finally, low supply chain risk ensures that buyers will not experience a shortage in supply or disrupted services.

Unfortunately for buyers, interior design service prices have been rising during the past three years. Strong price growth during the period largely resulted from increasing demand as the economy returned to growth and facilitated a surge in construction activity. “With the economy on the mend, corporate profit rose and the number of businesses increased, all of which contributed to strong demand for interior design services,” adds Outlaw. “In light of stronger demand, suppliers increased their prices, which has hurt buyer power.” Furthermore, the low availability of substitute services also undermines buyer power. Buyers can develop an in-house design team, but those employees can lack crucial knowledge of design services, such as adhering to building codes and regulations.

In spite of rising prices, price volatility has been low and is expected to remain low during the next three-year period. Low price volatility allows buyers to confidently secure their interior design services without fear of prices rising unexpectedly. However, prices are forecast to rise further in the next three years, and buyers are encouraged to secure their interior design services now rather than later. For more information, visit IBISWorld’s Interior Design Services procurement category market research report page.

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IBISWorld Procurement Report Key Topics

This report is intended to assist the buyers of interior design services. Providers of these services take building codes, health and safety regulations, traffic patterns, floor planning, mechanical and electrical needs, as well as interior fittings and furniture into consideration to design and run projects in interior spaces for clients. This report focuses on interior design for commercial buildings, rather than residential homes.

Executive Summary

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Product Characteristics

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Imports

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About IBISWorld Inc.

IBISWorld is one of the world’s leading publishers of business intelligence, specializing in Industry research and Procurement research. Since 1971, IBISWorld has provided thoroughly researched, accurate and current business information. With an extensive online portfolio, valued for its depth and scope, IBISWorld’s procurement research reports equip clients with the insight necessary to make better purchasing decisions, faster. Headquartered in Los Angeles, IBISWorld Procurement serves a range of business, professional service and government organizations through more than 10 locations worldwide. For more information, visit http://www.ibisworld.com or call 1-800-330-3772.







NLN Research Journal Publishes Themed Edition Featuring Evaluating Innovations in Nursing Education


Washington, DC (PRWEB) November 26, 2014

Nursing Education Perspectives, the NLN’s respected bimonthly peer-reviewed research journal was invited to publish initial findings from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Evaluating Innovations in Nursing Education (EIN) Initiative. EIN, based at the Center for State Health Policy at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ, was launched in 2008 in response to the growing shortage of nurses and nurse educators. Currently in its third grant cycle, the initiative supports evaluations of interventions that expand teaching capacity or promote faculty recruitment and retention in schools of nursing. So far, 12 grants of up to $ 300,000 have been awarded.

An important corollary to the EIN mission is the dissemination of evidence-based success in strategic interventions that may be widely replicated. “As a respected forum for presentation of evidence-based best practices and issues that are key to excellence in nursing education, Nursing Education Perspectives is a natural fit for these latest EIN findings,” noted NEP editor Joyce Fitzpatrick, PhD, RN, FAAN. “We made certain to expedite our peer-review process to respond to the foundation’s and the NLN’s shared interest in the timely publication of this research.”

Added NLN CEO Beverly Malone, PhD, RN, FAAN: “The NLN was delighted to be asked by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to showcase the groundbreaking EIN scholarship. Understanding how best to increase recruitment and retention of nurse educators dovetails with the NLN mission to promote excellence in nursing education to build a strong and diverse nursing workforce to advance the health of our nation and the global community.”

The six manuscripts accepted for publication, following NEP’s peer-review, are:

— “Increasing Faculty Capacity: Findings from an Evaluation of Simulation Clinical Teaching,” Hila Richardson, Lloyd Goldsamt, Janie Simmons, and Mattia Gilmartin; New York University

— “Dedicated Education Unit: Student Perspectives,” Vicki Nishioka, Michael Coe, Makoto Hanita, and Susan Moscato; University of Portland, OR

— “Dedicated Education Unit: Nurse Perspectives on their Clinical Teaching Role,” Vicki Nishioka, Michael Coe, Makoto Hanita, and Susan Moscato; University of Portland, OR

— “Building the Evidence for Dedicated Education Unit Sustainability and Partnership Success,” Joann Mulready-Shick and Kathleen Flanagan; University of Massachusetts, Boston

— “An Evaluation of State-based Support for Service Programs Targeting Nurse Faculty,” Jennifer Craft-Morgan, Don Pathman, Marilyn Oermann, T. R. Konrad, and Brandy Farrar; Georgia State University and University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

— “Evaluation of the First Two Years: A State-Wide Consortium’s Adoption of a Unified Nursing Curriculum,” Alice Tse, Victoria Niederhauser, John Steffen, Lois Magnussen, and Nova Morrisette; University of Hawaii at Manoa

In his guest editorial introducing the reported findings, “Effectiveness of Strategies Addressing the Nurse Faculty Shortage,” Michael Yedidia, PhD, national program director of EIN and professor at Rutgers University Center for State Health Policy, highlighted several trends in academic nursing that gave rise to the need to create and test specific interventions. Dr. Yedidia then issued a call to action to schools of nursing to join EIN in expanding the project’s scope.

To learn more about Nursing Education Perspectives and read the latest issue online, visit: http://www.nln.org/nlnjournal/index.htm.

Dedicated to excellence in nursing, the National League for Nursing is the premier organization for nurse faculty and leaders in nursing education. The NLN offers professional development, networking opportunities, testing services, nursing research grants, and public policy initiatives to its 40,000 individual and 1,200 institutional members. NLN members represent nursing education programs across the spectrum of higher education, and health care organizations and agencies.







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National Anti-Vivisection Society and International Foundation for Ethical Research Announce New Research Grants for Promising Young Investigators

Chicago, IL (PRWEB) November 11, 2014

The National Anti-Vivisection Society (NAVS) and the International Foundation for Ethical Research (IFER) are pleased to announce three first-time recipients of IFER Graduate Fellowships as part of the 2014-2015 grant cycle. By funding early career researchers with an interest in developing innovative alternatives to animal testing, NAVS and IFER hope to seed the scientific field with talented individuals prepared to integrate scientific discovery with ethics and respect for animals.

Recipients of IFER Graduate Fellowships, selected by IFER’s Scientific Advisory Board, have the potential to positively change the course of science by working to promote the advancement of humane methodologies that can spare animal suffering.

The investigators who are receiving first-time IFER Graduate Fellowships for 2014-2015 are:

Bryan Hassell, a Ph.D. candidate working in Dr. Donald Ingber’s laboratory at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, has received funding for his project, “Human Cancer-on-a-Chip as a Replacement for Animal Testing.” Bryan seeks to develop an organ-on-a-chip platform to determine how lung cancer cells respond to chemotherapy depending on their organ-specific microenvironment, as well as to identify new anticancer therapies. Bryan’s physics and engineering background, in combination with the extensive biological training that he is receiving in the Ingber lab, will allow him to take a multidisciplinary approach toward developing an innovative model that has the potential to replace the use of animals in cancer research.

Erica Schlesinger, a Ph.D. student at the University of California San Francisco working in Dr. Tejal Desai’s lab, received support for her project, “In-vitro 3D Flow Through System for Improved Intestinal Permeability Model.” Erica aims to develop a model in which human intestinal cells are grown on a tubular scaffold to better mimic the microenvironment of the intestine. Using this approach, experimental drugs can be flowed through the system, enabling drug absorption to be assessed. This new model has the potential to improve upon existing in vitro approaches to study drug absorption while reducing the need for more complex animal experimentation.

Sun Nee Tan, a Ph.D. candidate in the Graduate Program in Neuroscience at the University of British Columbia under the mentorship of Dr. Martin McKeown, will be using state-of-the-art brain imaging techniques on human subjects for her project, “Structural and Functional Neuroplasticity of Parkinson’s Disease Following a Sensori-Motor Contingent Musical Walking Intervention (Ambulosono).” Her study will determine the effectiveness of a music-contingent walking exercise program as an intervention for Parkinson’s disease subjects. Neuroscience studies traditionally rely heavily on animal models, despite their limited translatability to human populations; therefore the use of imaging techniques on human subjects to study neuroplasticity may replace conventional research which uses animal testing for this purpose.

IFER Graduate Fellowships are awarded annually in amounts up to $ 15,000 to early career scientists who are developing alternatives to the use of animals in product testing, biomedical research and education. Fellowships are renewable for up to three years. More information on the IFER Graduate Fellowship Program can be found at http://www.ifer.org/fellowships.php.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ANTI-VIVISECTION SOCIETY

Founded in 1929, the National Anti-Vivisection Society (NAVS) promotes greater compassion, respect and justice for animals through educational and advocacy programs based on respected ethical, scientific and legal theory. NAVS works to increase public awareness about animal testing and experimentation, to promote positive solutions that advance science, to support the development of alternatives to the use of animals, and to effect changes that will help end the unnecessary suffering of laboratory animals. For more information, visit http://www.navs.org.

ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR ETHICAL RESEARCH

Founded in 1985, the International Foundation for Ethical Research (IFER) supports the development, validation and implementation of innovative scientific methodologies that advance science and replace the use of animals in research, testing and education. IFER is funded primarily by a grant from the National Anti-Vivisection Society.







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