Archive for Medicine

Beth Netter, MD Presents Breath as Medicine at American Meditation Institutes Seventh Annual CME Conference to Help Relieve Physician Burnout


Averill Park, NY (PRWEB) May 26, 2015

Holistic physician and acupuncturist Beth Netter, MD will present a lecture on “Breath as Medicine” to help relieve burnout symptoms for physicians and other health care professionals at the 7th annual American Meditation Institute (AMI) CME conference on meditation, yoga and breathing November 3-7, 2015, at the Cranwell Resort and Spa in Lenox, Massachusetts. Entitled “The Heart and Science of Yoga,” this 30 CME mind/body medicine physician training is accredited through the Albany Medical College Office of Continuing Medical Education.

Now in its seventh year of providing physicians continuing medical education credits, AMI’s comprehensive curriculum will present an in-depth study of the historical, philosophical and scientific nature of Yoga Science as taught in both the East and West. A variety of practical yogic skills will be taught to help reduce the effects of stress and burnout by positively enhancing the attendee’s ability to make health-affirming lifestyle choices. In turn, conference participants will become qualified to teach these same skills to their patients.

Yogic breathing is a fundamental practice of Yoga Science. Dr. Netter’s “Breath as Medicine” presentation will address the importance of diaphragmatic breathing as a means to optimize blood flow, provide sufficient oxygen to the body and improve heart-rate variability. The complete (three-part) yogic breath will be demonstrated and practiced by all conference attendees. Recent medical studies have acknowledged that by stimulating the vagus nerve, yogic breathing techniques can increase neurotransmitters in the brain that reduce anxiety and depression.

Presenter Beth Netter MD is a holistic physician and acupuncturist in Albany, New York. She graduated from the University at Buffalo’s School of Biomedical Sciences, and completed her residency in anesthesiology at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA. Dr. Netter is an AMI certified meditational therapist, and currently serves as Chair of the AMI Medical Education Department.

As part of AMI’s “Yoga of Medicine” program, this 30 CME conference is dedicated to providing quality, comprehensive and evidence-based education. AMI’s CME conference will offer a broad curriculum of Yoga Science as mind/body medicine to enhance the health and wellbeing of both healthcare providers and their patients. Topics will include meditation, diaphragmatic breathing, mantra science, Yoga psychology, mind function optimization, nutrition, Functional Medicine, Epigenomics, Ayurveda, easy-gentle yoga, lymph system detoxification, how to relieve stress and burnout, and the chakra system as a diagnostic tool.

The devotion, enthusiasm, and teaching methodology of the entire AMI faculty will combine to create a dynamic and interactive course for their students. Each faculty member is committed to the advancement and training of Yoga Science as holistic mind/body medicine. In addition to Beth Netter MD, presenters will include faculty director Leonard Perlmutter, AMI founder, meditational therapist and award-winning author; Mark Pettus MD, board-certified internist and nephrologist; Susan Lord MD, lecturer and holistic health consultant for Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health; Kathie Swift, MS RDN LDN, leading educator and practitioner in the field of integrative nutrition and author of “The Inside Tract: Your Good Gut Guide to Great Digestive Health;” Rosy Mann BAMS, senior faculty member of Kripalu School of Ayurveda; Prashant Kaushik MD, board-certified rheumatologist and Interim Rheumatology Program Director for the Albany Medical Center and Stratton VA Hospital; Anthony Santilli MD, board-certified pulmonologist and critical care specialist practicing in Schenectady, NY; and world-renowned artist Jenness Cortez Perlmutter, co-founder and faculty member of AMI.

The National Institutes of Health report that approximately 38% of adults in the United States aged 18 and over, and nearly 12% of U.S. children 17 years and under use some form of complementary and alternative medicine. Significant among these therapies are deep breathing exercises, meditation and yoga––all of which are offered in “The Heart and Science of Yoga” CME course. “This is the first CME approved conference in the nation covering the complete science of Yoga. Its holistic content is designed to provide healthcare professionals and their patients a 5,000 year old, time-tested, science-based mechanism for dealing with the debilitating effects of stress, illness and burnout,” Perlmutter said. “The more consistently the therapeutic practices of meditation and yoga are incorporated into the daily lives of physicians and patients, most symptoms of stress related burnout and chronic complex diseases can be diminished or eliminated.”

This sentiment is echoed by recent conference graduate, Joel M. Kremer, MD, who is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology in Albany, New York: “This teaching has been an enormous benefit in my personal and professional life. I have less stress, more focus, and am able to serve my patients with greater clarity. It becomes surprisingly easy now to recognize the many clinical situations in which patients with somatic manifestations of ‘dis-ease’ could greatly benefit from Yoga Science.”

In addition to Dr. Kremer, numerous medical pioneers and healthcare professionals such as Mehmet Oz MD, Dean Ornish MD and Bernie Siegel MD have also endorsed AMI’s core curriculum. Previous conference attendees have also noted that the material presented has made a beneficial impact toward their personal and professional efforts at self-care.

About the American Meditation Institute

The American Meditation Institute is a 501(c)3 non-profit educational organization devoted to the teaching and practice of Yoga Science, meditation and its allied disciplines as mind/body medicine. In its holistic approach to wellness, AMI combines the healing arts of the East with the practicality of modern Western science. The American Meditation Institute offers a wide variety of classes, retreats, and teacher training programs. AMI also publishes “Transformation,” a bi-monthly journal of meditation as holistic mind/body medicine. Call 800.234.5115 for a mail or email subscription.

Media Contact:

Robert Washington

60 Garner Road, Averill Park, NY 12018

Tel: 518-674-8714

Fax: 518-674-8714







700 Doctors, Health Professionals, Including the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, Support Dietary Guidelines Message to Eat Less Meat, More Plants


Nashville, TN (PRWEB) May 26, 2015

Over 700 doctors, nutritionists, nurses, and public health professionals sent a letter to the secretaries of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services urging them to embrace the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee’s recommendations to eat less meat and more plants for human health, economic prosperity, and our nation’s food security.

Leaders in lifestyle and preventive medicine signed the letter, including: Dr. David Katz, founding director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center and president of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine; Dr. Walter Willet, chair of the department of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health; and Dr. Dean Ornish, Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.

In the letter, doctors and others “strongly endorse the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee’s recommendations to reduce consumption of animal foods and shift toward a more plant-based diet, both for the health of people and the planet.” The letter reaffirms the overwhelming scientific evidence for eating less meat and more plants clearly delineated by the committee.

One of the letter’s initial signers, Dr. David Katz, summarized why sustainability is important to nutrition: “If, in an age when we know that food and water shortages are clear and present dangers, we choose to ignore them in our dietary guidelines, then these are not dietary guidelines for Americans…They are, instead, dietary guidelines for the current generation of American adults, and at the obvious expense of all subsequent generations of American (and planetary) adults including of course, our children.”

Dr. Dean Ornish, known as the, “Father of Lifestyle Medicine,” and Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco added: “What’s good for you is also good for our planet. Although heart disease and diabetes kill more people each year worldwide than all other diseases combined, these are completely preventable and even reversible for at least 95% of people today by changing diet and lifestyle. Federal dietary guidelines as recommended by the scientific advisory committee would play a vital role in moving more people toward this goal.”

The letter further highlights how “a shift toward more plant-based foods will save the nation billions of dollars in health care costs and is essential to our nation’s health and economic prosperity,” because “chronic, preventable diseases are estimated to account for 75 percent of all healthcare costs.” Also, “heavy meat consumption, especially red and processed meat, is associated with increased risks of heart disease, diabetes and some cancers, while plant-based diets are associated with decreased risks of all three.”

In its comment submitted to the federal government, the American Public Health Association, representing over 30,000 public health professionals commended the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee for, “setting a priority of sustainability as an important component of the 2015 federal dietary guidance.” APHA praised the quality of the science relied upon by the committee and noted the committee’s conclusions on sustainability “… are important given the high level of resources used as inputs for food production in the U.S. – including 50 percent of the total U.S. land area, 80 percent of the fresh water and 10 percent of the fossil energy – and the importance of these resources for future food security.”

The inclusion of sustainability in the Dietary Guidelines recommendations has sparked tremendous interest, with more than 29,000 comments submitted to USDA and HHS by the May 8 deadline. The agencies plan to review comments and finalize the 2015 guidelines by the end of the year.

About the American College of Lifestyle Medicine (ACLM):

ACLM is a professional association of physicians and clinicians dedicated to the advancement and practice of Lifestyle Medicine as the foundation of a transformed and sustainable healthcare system. Lifestyle Medicine is a branch of evidence-based medicine in which comprehensive lifestyle changes (including nutrition, physical activity, stress management, social support and environmental exposures) are used to help prevent, treat and even reverse the progression of many chronic diseases by addressing their underlying causes. Visit http://www.lifestylemedicine.org, and learn more about ACLM’s annual conference, Lifestyle Medicine 2015, set for November 1-4, 2015 in Nashville, TN at http://www.lifestylemedicine2015.org.







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Medicine World Enterprises, LLC – Stress and Hormones Affect Weight More Than Previously Understood

New York, NY (PRWEB) April 08, 2015

Very few professionals would argue with the proposition that diet and exercise combine to represent the fundamental components of weight management. However, it turns out that two other factors, stress and hormones contribute significantly. They appear to interact and contribute to the ways that most people process food and benefit from exercise. The good news is that both are manageable to a degree that has significant bearing on weight control.

Dr. Veronica Anderson has analyzed data from the Mayo Clinic, Harvard, and other reliable sources. She recognizes that the general categories of food consumption and exercise have multiple subcategories including genetics, hormonal issues, diet quality, sleep, and stress. The public least understands stress and hormones, but they offer everyone the best opportunity to make adjustments.

The way Dr. Veronica describes the connection is that stress is the human body’s natural response to perceived threats. An example she uses is that you suddenly realize your toddler has wandered away from your sight at a park playground. A region of the brain known as the hypothalamus stimulates adrenal glands that release adrenaline and cortisol. The adrenaline raises your heart rate, blood pressure, and energy. It is cortisol, the number one stress hormone, which increases the sugar supply in the bloodstream (leading to weight gain), inhibits the immune system, and suppresses digestion. Other by-products include fear, mood disruptions, and reduced motivation.

In the example, as soon as you notice your child emerge from a play structure, the hormone levels normalize and everything else self regulates once again. However, today’s world has a way of maintaining elevated levels of stress beyond normal parameters. Long-term stress response, even at the relatively low levels we experience in competitive working environments, leads to heart disease, sleep disorders, depression, memory impairment, and weight gain.

Unfortunately, the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) has increased the problem since it has resulted in a reduction in reimbursements to physicians who deal with these issues. Proactive health care practitioners such as Dr. Veronica advise against taking pills that only mask the symptoms. Rather, she recommends managing stress with her 5 Pillars of Health program that include: 1-Detoxification, 2-Nutrition, 3-Fitness, 4-Nervous System Maintenance, and 5-Hormonal Regulation.

While stress reduction strategies such as meditation, yoga, and other relaxation techniques play a role, Dr. Veronica notes the long-term solutions to uncontrollable weight extend beyond those. She adds, “You cannot just quit your job or get a divorce.” She instructs people that they must learn about the cycle of stress and sustainable methods to break it.

About Dr. Veronica Anderson:

Dr. Veronica has appeared on all major news networks including NBC, CBS, ABC, Fox News Network, and CNN. She has been published multiple times on Huffington Post. She hosts the radio show, Wellness for the REAL World on BlogTalkRadio. She is an avid proponent of combining traditional Western medical care with holistic and alternative remedies. Dr. Veronica M.D. is headquartered at 1485 Fifth Ave. #19-D New York, New York. Contact Dr. Veronica at 609.577.9893 or online at: info@drveronica.com

Sources:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/weight-loss/in-depth/metabolism/art-20046508

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/obesity-prevention-source/obesity-causes/







University of Westerm States hires new functional medicine doctor for clinic system


Portland, Ore (PRWEB) March 13, 2015

University of Western States (UWS), a leader in the education of health care professionals, recently added Rachel Fischer, MD, MPH to the UWS clinic system. Dr. Fischer’s background in preventive and functional medicine also earned her a role as a faculty member in the new Northwest Center for Lifestyle and Functional Medicine (NWCLFM) at UWS. In this role, she will serve as the Integrative Therapeutics distinguished professor of functional medicine, teaching functional and preventive medicine to students in the HNFM program.

Functional medicine integrates the most recent Western medical data and practices with a focus on prevention and reversing disease progression through nutrition, exercise, stress management, as well as with drugs, supplements or therapeutic diets.

“We are very excited to have Dr. Fischer join our clinic and teaching staff. Her experience as a medical doctor with a background in functional and preventive medicine not only broadens the scope of services we can provide to patients, it also aligns with the goals and visions of the university’s new Northwest Center for Lifestyle and Functional Medicine. She shares in our belief that treating disease must start with finding the root cause,” Dr. Will Evans, provost and executive vice president at University of Western States said.

Dr. Fischer obtained her medical degree from University of Utah, where she also completed two years of medical residency in internal medicine. Dr. Fischer then completed her residency and fellowship in occupational and environmental medicine at University of Washington. Additionally, she completed a Master of Science with a focus in epidemiology from University of Utah and a master of public health focused in environmental health from University of Washington. Dr. Fischer is board certified by the American Board of Preventive Medicine and is currently pursing certification by the Institute of Functional Medicine.

“While my experience and education made this position a perfect fit for me,” Dr. Fischer said, “ultimately, it was the people and their shared belief that a transformation in patient care is necessary to address the complex, chronic diseases that so significantly impact public health.”







National Nutrition Month


Austin, Texas (PRWEB) March 05, 2015

March is National Nutrition Month®, an annual nutrition education and information campaign sponsored by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The 2015 theme is “Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle,” which promotes the consumption of fewer calories, informed food decisions, and daily exercise for achieving and maintaining a healthy weight, reducing risks of chronic diseases and promoting overall wellness.

Whether a person is new to physical fitness activities or a pro, nutrition can seem complicated. Many nutritionists create intense and detailed food regimens for their clients, but a solid nutrition program can be simple and still very beneficial. For those wanting the most from a diet and fitness routine, the following tips may help:

1.    Daily balanced diet. For consistent performance at the gym or with a sport, the body needs a regular supply of quality energy for the muscles. A few daily essentials for meeting the body’s needs include: a balanced breakfast; carbohydrates for fuel; and proteins and fats appropriate for a person’s individual body-type and fitness goals.

2.    Day of the workout. For those tackling a workout first thing in the morning, be sure to have a light breakfast like fruit, toast, and/or an egg. For those who workout in the evenings, have a lunch that easily digestible but includes complex carbs. Pasta, fruits, vegetables or a salad with lean meat (chicken or fish) are good examples.

3.    Immediately prior to workout. About 30 minutes before an intense workout, eat a light to moderate snack and drink some water. The amount of food a person should ingest depends on the length and intensity of their upcoming workout. Longer, harder activities may require the individual to eat an energy bar or large banana.

4.    During workout. Necessary hydration varies from person to person, but a good rule of thumb is to intake 8 to 10 fl oz of water every 15 minutes while exercising. For those working out longer than 90 minutes, carbohydrates will likely need to be replenished as well, making a sports drink more of an ideal choice.

5.    Post-workout hydration. After a workout, water needs to be replaced in the body according to how much a person has sweated. The more perspiration, the more hydration required. To be absolutely precise, check body weight before and after the physical activity. For every pound decrease, a person should drink about 3 cups of water.

6.    Post-workout food. Glycogen stores should be replenished within two hours after an intense workout. Research shows that a 4-to-1 ratio of carbs to proteins is the ideal post-workout nutrition combination. The nourishment can come in the form of solid food, a liquid shake, or a combination of the two.

Medicine in Motion (MIM) specializes in providing top quality sports medicine in Austin, Texas, for athletic individuals of all ages and levels. The staff at MIM believes active bodies are healthy bodies, therefore it is the office’s goal to keep patients energetic and fit. To that end, MIM provides treatment of injuries and illnesses, including the use of physical rehabilitation; promotes healthy living with personal training and nutrition coaching; and offers comprehensive sports medicine evaluations to optimize health, activity level and sports performance. For more information or for questions regarding sports medicine in Austin, contact Medicine in Motion at 512-257-2500 or visit the website at http://www.medinmotion.com.







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Society for Vascular Medicine Remedies Inaccuracies in New York Times Medicare Article

Deerfield, IL (PRWEB) February 03, 2015

The Society for Vascular Medicine (http://www.vascularmed.org) read with disappointment the New York Times article, “Medicare Payments Surge for Stents to Unblock Blood Vessels in Limbs,” noting a series of inaccuracies that limit the discussion of this very important topic.

First, through the Choosing Wisely initiative (http://www.choosingwisely.org), the Society for Vascular Medicine does not warn that people typically do not need invasive treatment for peripheral artery disease (PAD). Our recommendation states, “[providers should] Refrain from percutaneous or surgical revascularization of peripheral artery stenosis in patients without claudication or critical limb ischemia,” warning against inappropriate use in patients who do not have leg symptoms.

Second, the article decries the surge in vascular procedures, focusing on peripheral artery interventions. However, as the figure in the article clearly shows, artery interventions have been relatively stable since 2006. As noted in the figure, vein interventions have more than doubled over this time period, but warrant scant attention in this article.

Third, the article underestimates significantly the prevalence of PAD in the United States. The best estimates suggests that 1 in 5 men and 1 in 6 women has peripheral artery disease in the Medicare population (patients 65 years or older) (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14709362). This misconception prevents physicians and patients from getting life saving care: patients with PAD have a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular death.

Fourth, and perhaps most importantly, the article notes twice that most PAD patients can be treated with exercise alone. Unfortunately, despite extensive clinical evidence that exercise training improves leg symptoms for patients with PAD and is cost effective compared to intervention, Medicare does not cover supervised exercise programs for PAD as it does for heart and lung disease. The prescription for exercise without supervision has been shown to fail time and again. Unfortunately, because of the lack of Medicare coverage for supervised exercise therapy, most PAD patients do not have access to the safest and most cost effective therapies for this disease. The failure of Medicare to pay for inexpensive, effective exercise therapy, while being willing to pay for expensive interventional therapy, warrants further discussion.

The Society for Vascular Medicine strongly endorses the appropriate use of therapies to improve the quality and length of life for patients with vascular disease. We decry inappropriate use of any therapy and have an ongoing commitment to improving the lives of our patients, as well as better understanding of vascular disease. We believe that there is both overuse and underuse of medical and invasive therapies, but the misinterpretation of information only hinders progress towards improving the lives of our patients.

For more information contact SVM Executive Director Lee Ann Clark at lclark(at)vascularmed(dot)org or call 847-480-2961, Ext. 220.

The Society for Vascular Medicine is a professional organization founded in 1989 to improve the integration of vascular biological advances into medical practice, and to maintain high standards of clinical vascular medicine. The Society is distinguished by its emphasis on clinical approaches to vascular disorders. Learn more at http://www.vascularmed.org.







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Personal Peptides Announces Precision Medicine Solution for Cancer Treatment


Houston, Texas (PRWEB) February 03, 2015

Personal Peptides, a provider of precision medicine based on genomic analysis, today announced the availability of a nutrigenomic tool for oncology: the ImmunoDiet™. The ImmunoDiet™ is a test that sequences the genome of individuals to provide oncologists and nutritionists with the information required to create a customized nutrition plan designed to improve the outcomes of cancer patients.

The ImmunoDiet™ is an example of the type of treatment referred to by President Obama in his recent announcement of a major biomedical research initiative that includes the collection of genetic data on one million Americans so scientists could develop drugs and treatments tailored to the characteristics of individual patients.

“Cancer patients should make positive lifestyle changes, that can include a better diet and more exercise. But those changes can be tailored with information in the genomes of their cancer cells,” said Jahan Khalili, Ph.D, Personal Peptides founder. “The ImmunoDiet test has delivered actionable information for every sample we’ve analyzed so far. We see cancers that mimic foods like spinach and pomegranate in addition to the most likely suspects, including cows and other mammals.”

Cancer can mutate to mimic certain proteins found in food, and consuming these foods has the potential to suppress the cancer specific immune system. Similarly, a strategy to avoid foods that may damage the cancer-specific immune system may help boost an ongoing immune system response against cancer. The challenge is that the DNA in each individual’s cancer is different. As a result, treatments must be customized for each person. Personal Peptides enables health and nutrition providers to counsel patients to manage their diets according to the individual DNA of their cancer with the aim of improving their outcomes.

About ImmunoDiet™

The ImmunoDiet™ is the only nutrigenomic cancer diet designed to prevent food-based suppression of cancer-specific immune response. Built to function like immunotherapy, this personalized food avoidance diet may prevent damage to cancer-specific T cells. The ImmunoDiet™ is offered as a one-of-a-kind tool for patients who desire to make safe food choices based on their individual cancer.

If oral tolerance is acting on the same T cells that are trying to fight a cancerous tumor, this may be stopped with the knowledge provided by the nutrigenomic ImmunoDiet™. Avoiding foods containing mutated molecular mimics, called M3 peptides, may help specifically boost one’s unique anti-cancer immune response.

The food to avoid when you have cancer is your tumor. When mice are fed the proteins from their tumor, the cancer in the body grows 25% faster, in less than three weeks. Because cancer can mutate to mimic some foods, this experiment describes a path to guide a food avoidance diet. Extending this experimental benefit to patients is the mission of Personal Peptides and the hope embodied in the ImmunoDiet™.

Testing the ImmunoDiet™

Testing the efficacy of the ImmunoDiet™ in humans is crucial, even though dietary interventions are especially challenging as they should coincide with treatments administered by oncologists. Personal Peptides is currently conducting tests to determine patient compliance with food avoidance recommendations. The results will allow us to move forward with a study to determine efficacy. The efficacy study will likely be conducted with cancer survivors who have achieved remission with an immunotherapy. We will be able to measure clinical end points in addition to physically track the T cells which cross react with the cancer and foods.

The first ImmunoDiet™ participant was a Ph.D. scientist who understood the T cell repertoire, the foundation of all efforts in the field of immunotherapy and how immune systems recognise “self” from “non-self”. The patient wanted to use an ImmunoDiet™ analysis on a suspicious mole removed a year prior. As moles can progress to melanoma and are sometimes excised as a precaution, this allowed the archived sample to be easily processed. For the doctor and the patient, the process is similar to requesting a second opinion.

When the sequencing of circulating DNA is more readily available, this testing can recommend food exclusions prior to diagnosis of frank cancer. This is how Dr. Khalili believes we can make the greatest impact in cancer.

Availability of the ImmunoDiet™

The ImmunoDiet™ is available through a client portal at http://www.immunodiet.com. Each patient must contact Personal Peptides to determine their eligibility. Personal Peptides provides the ImmunoDiet to patients who possess qualifying sequencing information. Those with solid cancers who do not already have their tumor sequenced may participate as well, though the delivery of the results will take four to six weeks longer to receive to allow for sequencing.

About Personal Peptides

Founded in Houston, Personal Peptides is the first company to develop a nutrigenomic tool for cancer patients, designed to improve their cancer specific immune system. By bridging the gap between the human immune system and personal genomics, Personal Peptides aims to provide individuals with the tools to sculpt their own immune repertoires.

For more information, please visit http://www.immunodiet.com







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