Archive for Improves

New Study Shows a Plant-Based Vegan Diet Improves Diabetic Neuropathy Pain, Lowers Body Weight

Washington, DC (PRWEB) May 28, 2015

A plant-based diet reduces the pain of diabetic neuropathy, according to new research published this week in Nutrition & Diabetes* by researchers with the Physicians Committee, California State University, East Bay, and the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

Neuropathy is a complication of diabetes manifesting as pain, numbness, and other nerve symptoms. The pilot study put 17 adults on a low-fat vegan diet for 20 weeks, with weekly nutrition classes. The researchers found significant improvements in pain, measured by the Short Form McGill Pain questionnaire, the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument physical assessment, and through electrochemical skin conductance in the foot. The participants also lost an average of 14 pounds.

“A dietary intervention reduces the pain associated with diabetic neuropathy, apparently by improving insulin resistance” notes Neal Barnard, M.D., president of the Physicians Committee. “The same diet also improves body weight and reduces cholesterol and blood pressure.”

Sixty percent of diabetes patients suffer from peripheral neuropathy, which is associated with hypertension, obesity, gait disturbances, amputations, anxiety, depression, and reduced quality of life.

“The dietary intervention is easy to prescribe and easy to follow,” says Cameron Wells, M.P.H., R.D., acting director of nutrition education for the Physicians Committee. “Steel-cut oats, leafy greens, and lentils are widely available at most food markets and fit well into most budgets.”

According to a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine**, patients who receive just 5.5 extra minutes of nutrition counseling from their primary care physician lose five pounds, reduce saturated fat intake, and improve LDL cholesterol.

More than 29 million Americans have diabetes. One in three children born in 2000 will develop diabetes at some point in his or her life.

The average lifetime cost to treat type 2 diabetes is $ 85,200, half of which is spent on diabetes complications.

Founded in 1985 by Neal Barnard, M.D., the Physicians Committee is a nonprofit health organization, with more than 12,000 doctor members, that promotes preventive medicine, conducts clinical research, and encourages higher standards for ethics and effectiveness in research.

*http://www.nature.com/nutd/journal/v5/n5/full/nutd20158a.html

**http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=484995







Workplace Lifestyle Intervention Program Improves Health, Reduces Diabetes and Heart Disease Risks


Pittsburgh, Pennslyvania (PRWEB) March 06, 2015

A healthy lifestyle intervention program administered at the workplace and developed by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health significantly reduces risk factors for diabetes and heart disease, according to a study reported in the March issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

The program was well-received by participants at Bayer Corp., who lost weight and increased the amount of physical activity they got each day, when compared with a control group in the study, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

“Health care expenditures associated with diabetes are spiraling, causing widespread concern, particularly for employers who worry about employee health and productivity,” said lead author M. Kaye Kramer, Dr.P.H., assistant professor in Pitt Public Health’s Department of Epidemiology and director of the school’s Diabetes Prevention Support Center. “This leads to an interest in workplace health promotion; however, there are very few evidence-based programs that actually demonstrate improvement in employee health. This study found that our program not only improves health, but also that employees really like it.”

This demonstration program is based on the U.S. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a national study that found people at risk for diabetes who lost a modest amount of weight through diet and exercise sharply reduced their chances of developing diabetes, outperforming people who took a diabetes drug instead.

Dr. Kramer and colleagues built on the DPP to create a group-based program that puts the findings into practice, called Group Lifestyle Balance™. The program is divided into 22 sessions over a one-year period and aimed at helping people make lifestyle changes to improve health. The sessions can be done as a group with a lifestyle coach or through a DVD coupled with brief weekly phone or, in certain cases, email consultations with the lifestyle coach. The option of the DVD with lifestyle coach support not only served as the main intervention option for those employees who traveled or who did not want to participate in the program in a group venue but also offered a valuable replacement for employees who chose to participate via group setting but had to miss an occasional session.

“Our Group Lifestyle Balance program has proven successful in diverse community settings, so we adapted it for the workplace since we found that there was a real need for effective programs that could fit into people’s work lives,” said senior author Andrea Kriska, Ph.D., professor in Pitt Public Health’s Department of Epidemiology and principal investigator of the study. “This current effort in the worksite shows clearly that a proven healthy lifestyle program, like the Group Lifestyle Balance program, offered to people where they work is not only feasible but effective in reducing risk factors for diabetes and heart disease for participating employees.”

A total of 89 employees at Bayer Corp. in Robinson Township, Pa., who were at risk for diabetes or heart disease were enrolled in the demonstration program in the fall of 2010 and followed for 18 months.

Over the course of a year, participants lost an average of 5 percent of their body weight (10 pounds), shrunk their waistlines by about 2 inches and brought down the levels of fat and sugar in their blood – all measures that reduce the risk of heart disease and diabetes. They also increased their physical activity by almost twofold.

Of the participants, 96 percent said they felt it was beneficial to offer the program at the worksite, and 99 percent said they would recommend it to their co-workers.

“The positive results that employees experienced from this lifestyle program speak to the benefits of personalized health programs in the workplace,” said Phil Franklin, M.D., U.S. corporate medical director, Bayer Corp. “I would like to congratulate the University of Pittsburgh researchers on the study.”

Additional authors on this research are Donald Molenaar, M.D., Veterans Health Administration in Minneapolis; Elizabeth Venditti, Ph.D., Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMC; and Vincent C. Arena, Ph.D., Rebecca Meehan, M.S., R.D., L.D.N., Rachel Miller, M.S., Karl Vanderwood, Ph.D., and Yvonne Eaglehouse, M.S., M.P.H., all of Pitt Public Health.

This research was funded by the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (R18 DK081323–04).

About the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health

The University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, founded in 1948 and now one of the top-ranked schools of public health in the United States, conducts research on public health and medical care that improves the lives of millions of people around the world. Pitt Public Health is a leader in devising new methods to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases, HIV/AIDS, cancer and other important public health problems. For more information about Pitt Public Health, visit the school’s Web site at http://www.publichealth.pitt.edu.







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Home Care Assistance’s Balanced Care Method Improves Quality of Life for Montreal Clients


Montréal, QC (PRWEB) February 20, 2015

Home Care Assistance of Montreal, a leading provider of in-home care, continues to offer a higher quality of care with its proprietary Balanced Care Method. Not content with the existing in-home care paradigms, which tend to focus solely on assistance with activities of daily living, Home Care Assistance designed the Method to promote healthy mind, body and spirit. The company has received overwhelming, positive feedback from medical and senior care professionals, praising the holistic and innovative approach to care.

Based on scientific studies of the world’s healthiest seniors, the Balanced Care Method captures five key behaviours correlated with healthy longevity: healthy diet, physical exercise, active social ties, mental stimulation and a sense of purpose and calm. Caregivers are professionally trained to incorporate each area of the Method in daily care to ensure that the same caliber of care is provided to clients across the globe. For example, caregivers have access to healthy meal preparation training through the company’s online Home Care Assistance University. Home Care Assistance also recently published a cookbook, Comfort Foods: A Healthy Twist on Classic Favourites, which provides healthy, tasty alternatives to traditional dishes, such as a “fried chicken” baked with a corn flake crust.

“To truly fulfill our mission to change the way the world ages, it’s important to not only educate our staff and clients on healthy aging and wellness, but to also provide this knowledge to our communities,” said Tim Thomas, owner of Home Care Assistance of Montreal. “We believe that empowering people to be proactive and informed when it comes to their health will lead to them making better health decisions, ultimately improving their quality of life.”

In addition to education around nutrition, Home Care Assistance caregivers are also trained to promote physical activity among their clients, tailored to client mobility and preference. Consistent exercise has been shown to delay memory loss, slow cognitive decline and muscle atrophy and boost mood and mental wellbeing. Home Care Assistance clients tend to not only maintain their physical statuses, but to improve and thrive through the program.

A thorough intake and continued client monitoring enable care managers to develop personalized care programs that incorporate client preferences, personality and history. For example if a client expresses a love of music and values active membership in community groups, a care manager would format a care plan with a dedicated focus on facilitating social ties and active engagement with music (creating, listening, discussing, etc.).

The Balanced Care Method is unlike any other care program in its tailored and research-based approach to longevity. The focus on overall wellbeing results in clients and caregivers reporting higher degrees of satisfaction and fulfillment, and is sure to continue setting the benchmark for excellence in the industry.

For more information on Home Care Assistance’s Balanced Care Method and our expertly trained caregivers, please visit http://www.HomeCareAssistanceMontreal.ca or call 514-907-5065. The office is located at 4464 Ste-Catherine West, Montreal, H3Z 1R7.

ABOUT HOME CARE ASSISTANCE

Home Care Assistance Montreal is the leading provider of home care for seniors in the Greater Montreal Area. Our mission is to change the way the world ages. We provide older adults with quality care that enables them to live happier, healthier lives at home. Our services are distinguished by the caliber of our caregivers, the responsiveness of our staff and our expertise in Live-In care. We also specialize in Alzheimer’s and dementia care, palliative care, stroke care, Parkinson care and companion care. For more information, visit http://www.HomeCareAssistanceMontreal.ca







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