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New Orleans-Themed Urban Design Competition Announces Four Finalists: Urban Land Institute To Hold Finale in April


Washington, DC (PRWEB) March 02, 2015

Four university teams, including two from Harvard University, one from the University of Maryland, and a joint team of students from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee and the University of Wisconsin – Madison, have been selected as the finalists for the thirteenth annual Urban Land Institute (ULI) Hines Competition, an ideas competition that challenges graduate students to create proposals for the development or redevelopment of a designated site in a U.S. metropolitan area. The competition is open to graduate students who are pursuing real estate-related studies at universities in North America.

The 2015 competition challenged multidisciplinary student teams with the task of devising a comprehensive design and development program for parts of the Tulane/Gravier and Iberville neighborhoods in downtown New Orleans. This year’s competition is designed to simulate an actual urban design and development scenario, with certain details changed for the purposes of the competition. In April, a $ 50,000 prize will be awarded to the team with the winning proposal, with $ 5,000 of the total going to the school. Each of the remaining three finalist teams will receive $ 10,000. This year, 120 teams comprising 600 students from 60 universities participated in the first round of the competition.

The Tulane/Gravier and Iberville neighborhoods, which make up a historically rich area in the city’s core, contain a mix of residential, industrial and commercial zoning that includes manufacturing plants and other small industrial complexes, many defunct, others still operational. The competition scenario is based on a hypothetical situation in which community stakeholders, including residents, land owners, local businesses, and others in the area bound by the upcoming Lafitte Greenway, the eastern edge of the new medical district, and crossed by the elevated I-10 highway, have come together to create the North Claiborne Neighborhood Improvement Association (NCNIA) – a fictional entity created for the purpose of the competition. NCNIA is seeking a master plan proposal that not only transforms the area into a thriving urban neighborhood, but also highlights its locational advantages, including its proximity to the French Quarter, adjacency to the medical district, and interaction with the Lafitte Greenway.

While based on a hypothetical situation, the 2015 Hines competition reflects many real-life concerns of New Orleans. The competition addresses the city’s continued effort to develop sustainable neighborhoods that represent New Orleans’s uniqueness with the promise of economic innovation and inclusion, as well as access to cultural, employment, transportation, and housing resources. As part of these efforts, the city recently completed the Livable Claiborne Communities (LCC) study.

The finalist teams and development schemes include:


Harvard University: Inspired by the architectural and cultural heritage of the project site and its adjacency to major city destinations and amenities, “Claiborne Grove” recalls the rich landscape that once characterized North Claiborne Avenue and prioritizes redevelopment of the street most critical to the growth and transformation of the neighborhood. The proposal’s central design element is “the Grove,” a linear multi-purpose park and urban landscape sited below elevated Interstate 10.

Harvard University: The project “Tremé 2.0” lays at the southern tip of the old Tremé district, one of New Orleans’s first urbanized neighborhoods outside of the Vieux Carre Rampart. The proposed 23-acre development project anticipatesTremé continuing its great tradition of making innovative transformation to the Crescent City, as it did 200 years ago.

University of Maryland: “The Crossing” development sows the seeds of resilience across the Bienville, Iberville, and Lafitte neighborhoods. By connecting tourist and native, greenway and park, neighborhood and city, The Crossing functions not only as a marketplace of goods, but of ideas and relationships. This commingling of people and place fosters diversity, neighborhood cohesion, and economic opportunity.

University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, and University of Wisconsin – Madison: “Quartier Vert” creates a vision of a community that operates as an intersection between communities, corridors of activity, and a variety of users. Intertwined within each of these strategies exists a neighborhood fabric that suggests the interaction between the site and its neighbors. Capitalizing on the existing locational and socioeconomic advantages of the area, Quartier Vert seeks to revive and enhance the surrounding community.

“All of the finalists make bold proposals for re-envisioning an area that is rich in potential,” said Jury Chairman J. Michael Pitchford, president and chief executive officer at CPDC in Silver Spring, Maryland. “This year’s submissions provide new approaches for how a combination of uses all work together to create an attractive destination that is financially realistic. These entries are all reflective of an up-and-coming generation that will provide fresh ideas worth exploring in the creation of sustainable urban landscapes.”

The competition jury consists of renowned experts from diverse backgrounds in real estate development. Jurors represent a strategic mix of land use experts, including developers, brokers, architects, urban designers, landscape architects, urban planners, and policy officials. In addition to Jury Chairman Pitchford, other jury members are: Tara Carter Hernandez, president, JCH Development, New Orleans, Louisiana; Dennis Dornan, senior associate and studio director, Perkins+Will, San Francisco, California; Kyrus L. Freeman, partner, Holland & Knight, Washington, D.C.; Jeff Hebert, executive director, New Orleans Redevelopment Authority, New Orleans, Louisiana; Matthew Hopkins, director of architecture and sustainability, StreetSense, Bethesda, Maryland; Michael Horst, consultant, New York, New York; Stephen G. Leeper, president and chief executive officer, 3CDC, Cincinnati, Ohio; Maureen McAvey, senior fellow and Bucksbaum Family chair for retail, ULI, Washington, D.C.; Kathryn L. Reynolds, founder and chief executive officer, Vivelan Group, New Orleans, Louisiana; Halina Steiner, creative director, dlandstudio, Brooklyn, New York; and Byron Stigge, director, Level Infrastructure, New York, New York.

In addition to the four finalists, the jury selected eight team proposals for honorable mention. The jury commended the University of Pennsylvania with “The Zipper: The Lafitte Terminal” for its realistic graphics, stimulating neighborhood vision, and overall good sense of placement; the University of Michigan with “Rooted” for its clear and cogent schematic process along with a cohesive and thoughtful environment vision; Ball State University with “Carondelet Noveau” for its creative spaces along the highway blocks, stimulating visualization of the parkway, and the general treatment under I-10; the University of Oklahoma with “Pulse: The Beat Street District” for the proposed urban layout, general sense of connectivity, and the outline density near block J; a joint team from Kent State University, Cleveland State University and Case Western Reserve University with “Delta Commons” for its distinct neighborhoods nodes and treatment of space under the highway; the University of Texas at Austin with “Claiborne Quarter” for its outstanding pro forma, good optimization of space, sense of scale, and key organizing element; the Georgia Institute of Technology with “Down the Line” for its phasing scheme, thoughtful relocation of the RV park, general space layout, and visual legibility; and the University of Oregon with “Urban Groves” for the diagrammatic visualization, a good optimization of real estate in plan, as well as the outlined cross section, and general presentation board design.

The Hines competition is part of an ongoing ULI effort to raise interest among young people in creating better communities, improving development patterns, and increasing awareness of the need for interdisciplinary solutions to development and design challenges. The competition is strategically structured to encourage cooperation and teamwork—necessary talents in the planning, design and development of sustainable communities—among future land use professionals and allied professions, such as architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, historic preservation, engineering, real estate development, finance, psychology and law. The competition is designed as an exercise; there is no intention that the students’ plans will be implemented as part of any revitalization of the site.

In final phase of the competition, the student finalist teams will have the opportunity to expand their original schemes and respond in more detail. Next month, a member of each team will be brought to New Orleans to tour the site and revise their presentations. On April 9, finalist team members will present their schemes to the competition jury members during a public forum in New Orleans. The event will culminate with the announcement of the winning team.

For more information on the ULI Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition, visit: http://uli.org/hines.

About the Urban Land Institute

The Urban Land Institute (uli.org) is a nonprofit education and research institute supported by its members. Its mission is to provide leadership in the responsible use of land and in creating and sustaining thriving communities worldwide. Established in 1936, the Institute has more than 34,000 members representing all aspects of land use and development disciplines.







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Global Wellness Institute and Scientific American Worldview Hold Roundtable on the Science of Wellness


New York, NY (PRWEB) February 25, 2015

The Global Wellness Institute™ (GWI) in partnership with Scientific American Worldview recently held an invitation-only roundtable on the topic of “The Science of Wellness: Hype or Hope?” Leaders from the medical, science, business, technology, research, media, workplace wellness and hotel/spa worlds gathered on February 11 at the Everyday Health headquarters in Manhattan for a wide-ranging conversation on the many ways that science and evidence-based medicine are impacting the wellness industry, and how wellness (and the growing medical evidence for wellness approaches) is impacting people, traditional medicine, private companies and public policy.

The discussion, co-moderated by Jeremy Abbate, VP, Global Media Alliances, Scientific American; Publishing Director, Scientific American Worldview and Susie Ellis, president and CEO of the GWI, included executives and experts from American Public Media, Cornell and Rutgers Universities, Delos, Everyday Health, The International Heart and Lung Institute Center for Restorative Medicine, Optum, Paramedical Consultants, Inc. (PCI), Patients Beyond Borders, Pegasus Capital Advisors, Six Senses, SRI International and Viacom Media Networks.

The leaders assembled identified numerous best steps forward to build a healthier world: from the need for powerful public health marketing campaigns around obesity and sedentary lifestyles – to a much more intense focus on cognitive/behavioral psychology to identify a “science of lifestyle change” for a world getting fatter and sicker – to a call for more (and more appropriately designed) clinical trials on wellness approaches.

A more detailed report on the recommendations emerging from this roundtable will soon be available at: http://www.globalwellnessinstitute.com/

Top Ten Recommendations – Experts gathered argued we need…

Simple, Provocative Public Wellness Campaigns: Some of the biggest “wellness successes” of the last century have involved powerful marketing messages (like the anti-smoking, “stop littering,” or “wear seatbelts” campaigns of the 20th century – or more recent ads visualizing how many packets of sugar reside in a can of soda). We need new health campaigns and public service announcements around weight loss/obesity and sedentary lifestyles that are simple, inspiring and are repeated over and over.

More Behavioral Sciences Research to Create a “Science of Lifestyle Change”: While medical research on the benefits of wellness approaches grabs headlines, the key to healthy populations is to begin to crack the code on helping people start, and sustain, lifestyle change. We know so little, and a more intense focus on, and new research in, the behavioral sciences and cognitive psychology (from brain plasticity to choice architecture) is critical if we ever want to create an evidence-based “science of lifestyle change and willpower.”

More, better-funded studies on wellness approaches: Clinical studies on wellness approaches represent the under-resourced “David” to Big Pharma’s “Goliath”. Average R&D costs for a new drug have reached $ 2.9 billion,* while funds for wellness clinical trials are drastically less (often under $ 100,000) – and the GWI estimates that (Stage 3) drug trials have around 100 times the participants: roughly 50 for a wellness study, vs. 4,000 for a drug trial. Without more, better-funded trials, highly respected medical organizations like Cochrane will continue to withhold positive recommendations in their meta-reviews on practices like meditation or yoga, even when there’s positive, preliminary evidence.

A Better Understanding of – and More Appropriately Designed – Wellness Studies: Clinical trials on wellness approaches often have unique qualities, and superimposing the double-blind model can be like fitting an “apple into an orange.” Placebo models don’t work when participants know they’re experiencing things like meditation or exercise, and wellness approaches often involve practitioners, so can’t be uniformly replicated (or regulated) like a pill. Short studies fail to capture the most meaningful outcomes for long-term, prevention-focused approaches, and all personalized medicines, like TCM and Ayurveda, defy the randomized trial model entirely. Another problem: most current studies on wellness approaches are performed on sick people (in the hospital setting), providing a limited view of their efficacy. Greater openness to analyzing (and valuing) outcomes from studies that can’t fit perfectly into double blind, or even randomized, trial designs is needed.

Doctors to Expand Their Understanding of the Wellness Concept & Consult the Evidence: Despite growth in integrative medicine, the medical experts at the roundtable agreed that the vast majority of physicians still narrowly equate “wellness” with testing (i.e., mammograms, osteoporosis checks, etc.), at which point the prevention “boat” has often already sailed. And while almost all doctors turn to evidence-based medicine databases to evaluate courses of treatment, “almost none” consult those databases for studies on wellness approaches – and the lion’s share of their required continuing medical education comes via drug companies. Medical systems, insurers and policy-makers must support more physician education around – and the “prescribing” of – wellness approaches like diet change, exercise, etc.

More Media Responsibility in Communicating Wellness Info: If people are unlikely to get much wellness information from doctors, they’re devouring it at media/digital channels, where there’s an explosion of reporting on the latest wellness studies and “miracle” breakthroughs. The rise of digital has been a double-edged sword: empowering people with unprecedented sources of health information (Google just reported that one in twenty searches is health-related), but also confusing them with contradictory, often un-contextualized new findings. More media responsibility, and more peer reviewing and curation of wellness studies by medical professionals, is needed.

To Stop Putting Wellness in the “Alternative Medicine” Bracket, If We Want to Serve Millennials: Entrenched healthcare systems and older generations have viewed medicine and wellness as separate, even antagonistic, domains, but the millennial generation (and younger) views health very holistically, where wellness, diet and exercise are not “alternative,” but key pieces in a total health puzzle. Medical systems and marketers that want to reach younger generations need to embrace that new reality.

To Recognize That Private Companies Are Often Leading in Applying Science to Wellness: Wellness is a $ 3.4 trillion,** consumer-driven market, and it’s private companies and public-private partnerships that are applying science to new wellness concepts the most creatively: from Delos building a lab with the Mayo Clinic to test and develop new “healthy for humans” features for the spaces people live and work in – to companies like Lighting Science creating healthy, nature-based lighting technologies – to new, billion-dollar “healthy cities” being developed globally, incorporating hospitals, education and every aspect of healthy living.

Workplace Wellness to Move Beyond Generic ROI Reporting and Focus on Culture Change: Companies are adopting workplace wellness programs at an explosive rate, but so many things are holding them back: from an obsession with ROI reporting that doesn’t measure results/returns against specific program components, to new signs that employee wellness is devolving into a “have/have not” situation. For instance, top executives may be embracing meditation at the World Economic Forum, but companies are increasingly profiting from penalties exacted from the most program resistant/high-risk workers. Successful workplace wellness initiatives must think beyond the “program” and focus on honest, top-to-bottom culture change.

Governments to Grasp That Health Is Wealth: Policymakers often perceive “wellness” as a matter of individual decisions and wellbeing, but the physical and mental health of national populations will increasingly decide national economic and political power. Countries focusing on prevention, and who can get healthcare spending under 10% of GDP, will increasingly have a global advantage.

Roundtable Participants:

Jeremy Abbate, VP, Global Media Alliances, Scientific American; Publishing Director, Scientific American Worldview

Dr. Brandon Alderman, Professor, Department of Exercise Science and Sport Studies, Rutgers University

David Brancaccio, Host, American Public Media’s “Marketplace Morning Report” (NPR)

Anna Bjurstam, VP of Spas and Wellness, Six Senses Hotels Resorts Spas; Owner, Raison d’Etre

Alfredo Carvajal, President, Delos International and Signature Programs, Delos

Susie Ellis, Chairman and CEO, Global Wellness Institute

Dr. Steven Gundry, Director, The International Heart and Lung Institute Center for Restorative Medicine

Anne Hubert, Senior Vice President, Viacom Media Networks

Neil Jacobs CEO, Six Senses Hotels Resorts Spas

Katherine Johnston, Senior Economist, SRI International

Dr. Nazlie Latefi, Chief Scientific Officer, Pegasus Capital Advisors

Clare Martorana, EVP and General Manager – Consumer Health and Wellness, Everyday Health

Beth McGroarty, Director of Research, Global Wellness Institute

Mim Senft, Wellness Director, Plus One Health Management, Optum

Mary Tabacchi, PhD, Professor, Cornell University

Susanne Warfield, CEO, Paramedical Consultants, Inc. (PCI)

Josef Woodman, CEO, Patients Beyond Borders

Ophelia Yeung, Senior Consultant, SRI International

Everyday Health donated its boardroom for the discussion. Lunch was provided by EXKi, a fair-trade certified, upscale, “quick-casual” restaurant that focuses on locally sourced, organic ingredients.

To learn more about the GWI’s roundtables, or the organization’s 2015 Global Wellness Summit being held in Mexico City from November 13-15, contact Beth McGroarty: beth.mcgroarty [at] globalwellnessinstitute [dot] com or (+1) 213.300.0107

*The Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development, 11/2014

** Global Wellness Institute, “Global Spa & Wellness Economy Monitor,” 2014

About the Global Wellness Institute: The Global Wellness Institute (GWI) is an international think tank that brings together leaders from the private and public sector to positively impact and shape the future of the wellness industry. It is the umbrella organization of the Global Wellness Summit (GWS) and the Global Wellness Tourism Congress (GWTC). The GWI is considered the leading global research and educational resource for the $ 3.4 trillion wellness industry, and WellnessEvidence.com, the world’s first online portal to the medical evidence for common wellness approaches, is a GWI initiative.