Archive for Four

SIGVARIS is Sporting Four Brand New Colors in the Popular PERFORMANCE SOCK Product Line



SIGVARIS PERFORMANCE SOCKS in blue

Get ready to hit the gym, road or field sporting the newest shades of the SIGVARIS PERFORMANCE SOCKS. Since the socks were first introduced, they have rapidly been gaining attention among active adults, physicians, fitness experts and athletic trainers. Their significant popularity has inspired four new, fun shades including: blue, lime, pink and red.

Utilizing innovative textile technology with active people in mind, the SIGVARIS PERFORMANCE SOCKS keep feet cool, dry and comfortable during any activity. The built-in Achilles tendon protector helps protect vulnerable ligaments and a cushioned foot bed was designed to keep feet blister free. In addition to the new colors, SIGVARIS PERFORMANCE SOCKS are also available in white and black.

The SIGVARIS PERFORMANCE SOCKS improve circulation and flush out lactic acid by featuring 20-30mmHg of medical-grade graduated compression from the worldwide leader in graduated compression.

Though there are many different athletic compression products on the market, the SIGVARIS PERFORMANCE SOCKS are constructed in a unique way. They are designed to be tightest at the ankle and decrease in pressure going up the leg. This construction helps fight the force of gravity and circulate blood back to the heart and lungs more efficiently, thus helping to improve athletic performance. They also help prevent varicose and spider veins.

The complete SIGVARIS SPORTS lineup includes the SIGVARIS ATHLETIC RECOVERY SOCKS, the SIGVARIS PERFORMANCE SLEEVES, the SIGVARIS PERFORMANCE SOCKS and the SIGVARIS MERINO OUTDOOR wool compression socks. To learn more about SIGVARIS SPORTS, visit: sigvarisusa.com.

About SIGVARIS

SIGVARIS® North America is part of an internationally active medical device group headquartered in Winterthur, Switzerland that focuses on the development, production and distribution of medical compression garments, including hosiery and socks. With distribution in more than 60 countries on six continents, SIGVARIS is recognized as a global industry leader in the area of compression therapy for the management of chronic venous disorders. SIGVARIS product lines include: SIGVARIS MEDICAL, SIGVARIS WELL BEING and SIGVARIS SPORTS. Our U.S. manufacturing plant is located in Peachtree City, Ga. In 2014, SIGVARIS celebrated its 150th Anniversary. For more information, please visit http://www.sigvarisusa.com. SIGVARIS is a registered trademark of SIGVARIS AG, CH-9014 St. Gallen/Switzerland and in many countries worldwide.







AIS Newsletter Finds Four Key Reasons for Lack of Interest in Small Business Health Options Program

Washington, DC (PRWEB) April 16, 2015

Since the beginning of the year, the Department of Health and Human Services has offered regular enrollment updates for federally facilitated exchanges, but has been silent about the state of its Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP). Some industry observers contacted by Atlantic Information Services, Inc.’s (AIS) Inside Health Insurance Exchanges (HEX) wonder if SHOP will ever attract interest. For its April issue, HEX identified four key barriers that could have led to limited participation in SHOP.

(1) The small-business tax credit isn’t attractive enough. The maximum credit is available only to the smallest small businesses (10 or less) with lower average annual wages per worker ($ 25,000 or less), and without real financial incentives, private insurance exchanges will appear to be the better option.

(2) There’s a lack of employee choice when it comes to choosing a plan in SHOP. In most states with federally facilitated exchanges, employers aren’t given the choice to choose a plan on the program, due largely to calls for a delay from state regulators who worried that a poorly functioning employee choice program would lead to delayed payments to carriers, misinformation, consumer confusion and adverse selection, HEX says. Chris Condeluci, a principal at CC Law & Policy in Washington, D.C., who worked for the Senate Finance Committee during the crafting of the health reform law, told HEX that SHOP is “clunky” and “glitch-riddled.”

(3) SHOP faces competition from private exchanges. For most small businesses, private exchanges offer more options and better features, such as decision-support systems, education tools and end-to-end transactional services, Condeluci tells HEX. They also offer full employee choice for medical coverage, and offer ancillary products and services such as vision, dental, life, financial and payroll, increasing their attractiveness.

(4) Once employers have to give up their grandfathered, non-ACA compliant plans, enrollment on SHOP is expected to increase slightly, HEX says, but the majority of employers are expected to explore their options with a broker or move to a private exchange.

“The underlying market isn’t so broken that employers are crying out for a solution,” Rosemarie Day, president of Day Health Strategies and former chief operating officer of the Massachusetts exchange, told HEX. “What they want is dramatically lower premiums, and that’s not what SHOP offers.”

Condeluci worries that more tax dollars will be funneled into SHOP “until we come to the realization that we spent billions of dollars on SHOP, which was a failing exercise.”

Visit http://aishealth.com/archive/nhex0415-01 to read the article in its entirety, which also reviews some of the most successful state-based exchanges in Utah, California and New Mexico.

About Inside Health Insurance Exchanges

Inside Health Insurance Exchanges provides hard-hitting news and strategies on public and private health insurance exchanges, written for business leaders with health plans, pharma companies, hospitals and health systems, brokers and agents, and exchange managers and vendors. The newsletter delivers reliable intelligence on this critical cornerstone of health reform — the players and their partners, product designs and enrollment results, employer perspectives and much more. Visit http://aishealth.com/marketplace/inside-health-insurance-exchanges for more information.

About AIS

Atlantic Information Services, Inc. (AIS) is a publishing and information company that has been serving the health care industry for more than 25 years. It develops highly targeted news, data and strategic information for managers in hospitals, health plans, medical group practices, pharmaceutical companies and other health care organizations. AIS products include print and electronic newsletters, websites, looseleafs, books, strategic reports, databases, webinars and conferences. Learn more at http://AISHealth.com.







New Orleans-Themed Urban Design Competition Announces Four Finalists: Urban Land Institute To Hold Finale in April


Washington, DC (PRWEB) March 02, 2015

Four university teams, including two from Harvard University, one from the University of Maryland, and a joint team of students from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee and the University of Wisconsin – Madison, have been selected as the finalists for the thirteenth annual Urban Land Institute (ULI) Hines Competition, an ideas competition that challenges graduate students to create proposals for the development or redevelopment of a designated site in a U.S. metropolitan area. The competition is open to graduate students who are pursuing real estate-related studies at universities in North America.

The 2015 competition challenged multidisciplinary student teams with the task of devising a comprehensive design and development program for parts of the Tulane/Gravier and Iberville neighborhoods in downtown New Orleans. This year’s competition is designed to simulate an actual urban design and development scenario, with certain details changed for the purposes of the competition. In April, a $ 50,000 prize will be awarded to the team with the winning proposal, with $ 5,000 of the total going to the school. Each of the remaining three finalist teams will receive $ 10,000. This year, 120 teams comprising 600 students from 60 universities participated in the first round of the competition.

The Tulane/Gravier and Iberville neighborhoods, which make up a historically rich area in the city’s core, contain a mix of residential, industrial and commercial zoning that includes manufacturing plants and other small industrial complexes, many defunct, others still operational. The competition scenario is based on a hypothetical situation in which community stakeholders, including residents, land owners, local businesses, and others in the area bound by the upcoming Lafitte Greenway, the eastern edge of the new medical district, and crossed by the elevated I-10 highway, have come together to create the North Claiborne Neighborhood Improvement Association (NCNIA) – a fictional entity created for the purpose of the competition. NCNIA is seeking a master plan proposal that not only transforms the area into a thriving urban neighborhood, but also highlights its locational advantages, including its proximity to the French Quarter, adjacency to the medical district, and interaction with the Lafitte Greenway.

While based on a hypothetical situation, the 2015 Hines competition reflects many real-life concerns of New Orleans. The competition addresses the city’s continued effort to develop sustainable neighborhoods that represent New Orleans’s uniqueness with the promise of economic innovation and inclusion, as well as access to cultural, employment, transportation, and housing resources. As part of these efforts, the city recently completed the Livable Claiborne Communities (LCC) study.

The finalist teams and development schemes include:


Harvard University: Inspired by the architectural and cultural heritage of the project site and its adjacency to major city destinations and amenities, “Claiborne Grove” recalls the rich landscape that once characterized North Claiborne Avenue and prioritizes redevelopment of the street most critical to the growth and transformation of the neighborhood. The proposal’s central design element is “the Grove,” a linear multi-purpose park and urban landscape sited below elevated Interstate 10.

Harvard University: The project “Tremé 2.0” lays at the southern tip of the old Tremé district, one of New Orleans’s first urbanized neighborhoods outside of the Vieux Carre Rampart. The proposed 23-acre development project anticipatesTremé continuing its great tradition of making innovative transformation to the Crescent City, as it did 200 years ago.

University of Maryland: “The Crossing” development sows the seeds of resilience across the Bienville, Iberville, and Lafitte neighborhoods. By connecting tourist and native, greenway and park, neighborhood and city, The Crossing functions not only as a marketplace of goods, but of ideas and relationships. This commingling of people and place fosters diversity, neighborhood cohesion, and economic opportunity.

University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, and University of Wisconsin – Madison: “Quartier Vert” creates a vision of a community that operates as an intersection between communities, corridors of activity, and a variety of users. Intertwined within each of these strategies exists a neighborhood fabric that suggests the interaction between the site and its neighbors. Capitalizing on the existing locational and socioeconomic advantages of the area, Quartier Vert seeks to revive and enhance the surrounding community.

“All of the finalists make bold proposals for re-envisioning an area that is rich in potential,” said Jury Chairman J. Michael Pitchford, president and chief executive officer at CPDC in Silver Spring, Maryland. “This year’s submissions provide new approaches for how a combination of uses all work together to create an attractive destination that is financially realistic. These entries are all reflective of an up-and-coming generation that will provide fresh ideas worth exploring in the creation of sustainable urban landscapes.”

The competition jury consists of renowned experts from diverse backgrounds in real estate development. Jurors represent a strategic mix of land use experts, including developers, brokers, architects, urban designers, landscape architects, urban planners, and policy officials. In addition to Jury Chairman Pitchford, other jury members are: Tara Carter Hernandez, president, JCH Development, New Orleans, Louisiana; Dennis Dornan, senior associate and studio director, Perkins+Will, San Francisco, California; Kyrus L. Freeman, partner, Holland & Knight, Washington, D.C.; Jeff Hebert, executive director, New Orleans Redevelopment Authority, New Orleans, Louisiana; Matthew Hopkins, director of architecture and sustainability, StreetSense, Bethesda, Maryland; Michael Horst, consultant, New York, New York; Stephen G. Leeper, president and chief executive officer, 3CDC, Cincinnati, Ohio; Maureen McAvey, senior fellow and Bucksbaum Family chair for retail, ULI, Washington, D.C.; Kathryn L. Reynolds, founder and chief executive officer, Vivelan Group, New Orleans, Louisiana; Halina Steiner, creative director, dlandstudio, Brooklyn, New York; and Byron Stigge, director, Level Infrastructure, New York, New York.

In addition to the four finalists, the jury selected eight team proposals for honorable mention. The jury commended the University of Pennsylvania with “The Zipper: The Lafitte Terminal” for its realistic graphics, stimulating neighborhood vision, and overall good sense of placement; the University of Michigan with “Rooted” for its clear and cogent schematic process along with a cohesive and thoughtful environment vision; Ball State University with “Carondelet Noveau” for its creative spaces along the highway blocks, stimulating visualization of the parkway, and the general treatment under I-10; the University of Oklahoma with “Pulse: The Beat Street District” for the proposed urban layout, general sense of connectivity, and the outline density near block J; a joint team from Kent State University, Cleveland State University and Case Western Reserve University with “Delta Commons” for its distinct neighborhoods nodes and treatment of space under the highway; the University of Texas at Austin with “Claiborne Quarter” for its outstanding pro forma, good optimization of space, sense of scale, and key organizing element; the Georgia Institute of Technology with “Down the Line” for its phasing scheme, thoughtful relocation of the RV park, general space layout, and visual legibility; and the University of Oregon with “Urban Groves” for the diagrammatic visualization, a good optimization of real estate in plan, as well as the outlined cross section, and general presentation board design.

The Hines competition is part of an ongoing ULI effort to raise interest among young people in creating better communities, improving development patterns, and increasing awareness of the need for interdisciplinary solutions to development and design challenges. The competition is strategically structured to encourage cooperation and teamwork—necessary talents in the planning, design and development of sustainable communities—among future land use professionals and allied professions, such as architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, historic preservation, engineering, real estate development, finance, psychology and law. The competition is designed as an exercise; there is no intention that the students’ plans will be implemented as part of any revitalization of the site.

In final phase of the competition, the student finalist teams will have the opportunity to expand their original schemes and respond in more detail. Next month, a member of each team will be brought to New Orleans to tour the site and revise their presentations. On April 9, finalist team members will present their schemes to the competition jury members during a public forum in New Orleans. The event will culminate with the announcement of the winning team.

For more information on the ULI Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition, visit: http://uli.org/hines.

About the Urban Land Institute

The Urban Land Institute (uli.org) is a nonprofit education and research institute supported by its members. Its mission is to provide leadership in the responsible use of land and in creating and sustaining thriving communities worldwide. Established in 1936, the Institute has more than 34,000 members representing all aspects of land use and development disciplines.







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Four Ohio Organizations Named Psychologically Healthy Workplace Award Winners by the Ohio Psychological Association

Columbus, OH (PRWEB) December 18, 2014

In today’s nonstop work environment, workplace pressures continue to mount. Productivity demands, information overload and increasing pressure to balance work and home lives can take a toll on employees’ health, well-being and job satisfaction. A 2013 survey by APA’s Center for Organizational Excellence found that job-related stress is a serious issue. More than one-third of working Americans reported experiencing chronic work stress and just 36 percent said their organizations provide sufficient resources to help them manage that stress. This work stress can affect both individual well-being and organizational performance.

Some Ohio organizations have responded to these pressures by taking care of their employees. These employers are creating workplaces that do more than just improve productivity – they build a strong, vibrant organizational culture that supports the company itself.

The Ohio Psychological Association is proud to announce its 2014 Psychologically Healthy Workplace Awards winners. These workplaces were evaluated in five areas: employee involvement, employee growth and development, health and safety, employee recognition and work-life balance.

Chillicothe and Ross County Public Library—Chillicothe

The Chillicothe & Ross County Public Library has seven locations in Ross County, serving a population of about 80,000 people.

The Chillicothe and Ross County Public Library recognizes that its employees are the most valuable resource and aims to provide them with the tools they need to achieve personal and professional success. All staff members are encouraged to participate in continuing education classes, webinars and workshops. Staff members are also active in the community with outreach events, fostering a sense of pride in the organization and increasing morale. This past spring, the staff took part in a “Live Healthy, Live Well Challenge.” The six week challenge was designed to help participants improve their health and maintain their weight or lose a few pounds by encouraging regular exercise, nutrition, recipe substitutions, and wellness tips. Of those who participated, 80 percent adopted practices to reduce their risk of chronic disease and 96 percent lost or maintained their weight.

Dawson—Columbus

Dawson is a family-owned recruitment and staffing agency, operating in Columbus since 1946. They place professionals in temporary, temp-to-hire, and full-time jobs in the fields of administrative, call center, skilled trades, accounting & finance, creative, information technology, engineering, legal, and health care.

Since implementing a wellness program over a year ago, Dawson has noticed several areas of improvement in morale, physical health and stress management. Dawson has an onsite, fully equipped gym with onsite locker rooms to enable workouts before, during, or after work. They also partner with a local gym to have trainers come to the office twice a week for group fitness classes. Dawson also has an annual Wellness Week to promote healthy activities. Last year the focus was on stress management and activities included free chair massages, stress management presentation, yoga class with free yoga mats, and water bottles, and a free month of group fitness. In a survey conducted last year, 81.82 percent of folks working at Dawson currently participate in a sport or exercise on a weekly basis.

The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company—Akron

Goodyear is one of the world’s largest tire companies, with operations in most regions of the world. Together with its subsidiaries and joint ventures, Goodyear develops, markets and sells tires for most applications. Goodyear operates 50 plants in 22 countries, with its world headquarters located in Akron, OH.

The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company introduced the GoodLife Program to help integrate all services and make sure all associates have access to programs to improve their quality of life. The original goal was to decrease the quickly escalating health care cost burden. However, it quickly became much broader. Goodyear started by hiring a Chief Health Officer. The program is designed to increase health in six components: physical, social, spiritual, emotional, environmental and mental. With the implementation of the GoodLife Program, associates have experienced a number of benefits. As a result of their “No One Gets Hurt” initiative, their incident/injury rate has dropped 28 percent. Employee satisfaction continues to improve with the most recent survey showing improvement in nine out of 12 categories. Over 10,000 of their U.S. associates now know their biometric numbers which can start them on a path toward healthier living.

Grants Plus—Cleveland

Grants Plus is a fundraising consulting firm that provides an infusion of energy and expertise for organizations of all shapes, sizes, and missions. Their team of experienced fundraising strategists, grant writers, and philanthropy experts boost their clients’ strengths with a roll-up-our-sleeves approach to the fundraising process.

Grants Plus is a fast growing company with a blossoming reputation for its forward-thinking employee-centered practices. Since the beginning they have paid close attention to balance, employee growth and autonomy, and other factors related to a psychologically healthy workplace. Grants Plus is built on a foundation of flexibility, as work is often completed by employees at their homes and on their own schedules. Their self-described “ridiculous levels of professional development,” includes regular, free educational sessions on a range of job-specific and workplace topics to personal health and wellness and recreational topics. Grants Plus also created and uses a quarterly scorecard system for reviews based on the company values: truth, bravery, hard work, laughter, professionalism and team. Supervisors meet with employees each quarter and have a dialog about the values and how the employee is demonstrating each one.

About a Psychologically Healthy Workplace

The benefits of a psychologically healthy workplace can include increased productivity and employee retention rates, recruiting advantages, company image enhancement, a better workplace atmosphere, and workers who are less stressed and more satisfied with their jobs. Applications for the 2015 awards will open in the spring.

For more information about Ohio’s Psychologically Healthy Workplace Award, visit ohpsych.org/about/awards/PHWA

Located in Columbus, OH, the Ohio Psychological Association is a membership organization of approximately 1,600 Ohio psychologists. Its mission is to advance psychology as a science, as a profession and as a means of promoting human welfare.