Archive for Disease

ExerClock Software Helps People in Sedentary Jobs to Improve Wellness and Prevent Sitting Disease


Hartland, WI (PRWEB) May 27, 2015

Fueled by the growing health epidemic linked to our society’s technology-driven, inactive employee workforce, Milwaukee-area Physical Therapist Cory Schneider has launched ExerClock, a new software application that reminds individuals and employees to exercise at work in the form of short micro-exercise videos performed throughout the day to break up prolonged periods of sitting. ExerClock helps employees boost metabolism, burn calories, and ward off metabolic disorders such as diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease that are common among sedentary employees.

“It’s troubling to me that approximately 70 percent of Americans spend at least 6-8 hours a day sitting, mostly at work. It is costing U.S. businesses more than $ 90 billion each year to treat diseases and conditions that stem from a lack of physical activity, which are commonly referred to as ‘sitting disease’,” said Schneider.

Individual ExerClock memberships are great for work-from-home employees, individuals with health risks, or even dedicated athletes and fitness buffs who desire to protect their health and wellness. While corporate memberships are available, individuals can sign up for ExerClock without having to go through an employer, leveraging this new technology as yet another way to keep themselves fit and moving throughout the day.

“I developed ExerClock to empower people to be more active, to take control of their health, and to increase their productivity throughout the work day. It’s time to put a stop to the ‘metabolic shutdown’ that occurs when our bodies don’t move. ExerClock is a terrific tool that gives us all that needed reminder, as well as the exercises to perform throughout our busy days. We are stimulating physical activity that leads to healthier, more productive lifestyles that help curb spiraling health care costs,” said Schneider.

Prompted Mini-Workouts Improve Wellbeing

ExerClock features a customizable computer reminder coupled with micro-exercises (brief exercise sessions, 1.5-3.5 minutes in duration) that are performed routinely throughout the day to stimulate metabolism and reduce the negative effects that prolonged sitting has on our bodies.

A 2009 study published by the American College of Sports Medicine reported that those who were most sedentary had a 50 percent increased risk of an early death, regardless of their fitness level.

“This means that even those who exercise regularly outside of work will benefit from breaking up prolonged periods of sitting with ExerClock’s reminders and micro-exercises during their work day,” said Schneider.

Individuals can schedule the timing of their exercise reminders, choose the video length (one to three minutes), the type of micro-exercise (yoga, lower back and neck, legs, core, carpal tunnel and more) and intensity (beginner, intermediate or advanced). They can also track their goals and progress in a customizable, personalized dashboard.

Additional Features Available

For wellness enthusiasts, ExerClock also can also be used in conjunction with fitness bands, such as fitbit®, to track nutrition and physical activity. For an additional fee, users can also consult with registered dietitians and fitness experts for custom dietary and fitness plans. Subscribers can also find recommended active office furniture like stand-up desks, as well as exercise equipment and nutritional supplements for sale through the website. To learn more about individual or corporate memberships, visit ExerClock.com.

About ExerClock

ExerClock is an active, engaging wellness tool designed to alleviate the health and productivity issues related to sedentary jobs and lifestyles. Developed by a physical therapist, ExerClock is a web-based computer program, coupling a customized reminder with individualized micro-exercise videos that are performed throughout the work day. This individual and corporate wellness program addresses the specific needs of each individual participant. ExerClock is focused on reducing the health risks associated with sedentary work lifestyles, by promoting physical activity that increases the body’s metabolism and strength, drastically raises mental awareness and productivity, and assists in driving down health care costs. Follow ExerClock on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.







More Exercise Program Press Releases

Beginning an Exercise Program When You Have Parkinson’s Disease

The 3 components of a complete fitness routine.

Regular exercise is vital for those with PD to assist you keep sturdy and mobile and maintain your independence and scale back the chance of falls. A complete exercise program should consist of the subsequent 3 components:

Aerobic/Cardiovascular Exercise.

The aim of aerobic exercise is to strengthen the guts and lungs and it conjointly helps you maintain a healthy weight and blood pressure. Examples of aerobic exercise embody walking, biking, swimming and aerobic dance classes. Aerobic exercise involves sustaining the exercise for fifteen-30 minutes to a level where you’re slightly out of breath and breaking a light-weight sweat. A common technique to judge your level of exertion is that the Rating of Perceived Exertion. On a scale of one-ten (with one being no exertion/asleep and 10 being utterly exhausted) you ought to understand that you’re exercising at a level of four-6. This means that you know you’re working out but you are not exhausting yourself. As your cardiovascular system becomes stronger you will notice that you are doing not get out of breath as quickly when walking or climbing stairs and as your lung capability improves thus can your ability to project your voice.

For those with PD there’s a tendency to run on the toes with a shuffling step and to carry the arms stiff when walking. Attempt to target stepping out with the heel 1st, toes flexed, and swing the opposite arm to leg.

Strength Training/Resistance Training/Weight Training

This sort of activity aims to strengthen the muscles of the body. Strength training involves moving your muscles against some kind of resistance like machines, free weights, tubing or even your own body weight. Not like aerobic exercise, these exercises ought to continuously be done slowly and with control. Stronger muscles facilitate your get in out of a chair or automotive, climb stairs, and lift/carry things such as groceries a lot of easily. Stronger muscles can additionally help you reduce your risk for a fall.

Stretching/Flexibility/Range of Motion Exercises

These exercises are designed to extend the flexibility and vary of motion within the muscles and joints. These exercises should be done once the body has “warmed-up” such as once aerobic exercise. Stretches should be held for 20-30 seconds each. Never bounce whereas in an exceedingly stretch as this may result in injury! Increased flexibility and range of motion makes everyday tasks such as turning your head to back up the car, grooming, putting on shoes, and reaching items in high and low places easier.

Tips to create exercise safe

Know any contraindications for any medical conditions you have.

This info ought to be provided to you by your doctor or a licensed physical or occupational therapist. Situations like joint replacements, osteoporosis, heart disease and diabetes, etc. all have specific issues with regard to exercise. Do your analysis before beginning to exercise as this can keep you safe and give a additional enjoyable and economical workout. If you’re having trouble together with your balance hunt for programs that provide chairs or railings to carry onto.

Use wisdom and listen to your body.

Exercise ought to not hurt, it should help! Feeling a bit achy or stiff when exercise is traditional, but pain may be a signal that something is wrong. Never exercise to the point of pain and discontinue any exercise that makes your symptoms worse. You must never “feel” the exercise in your joints together with the neck and back. Your body is aware of best. Use the feedback from your body to evaluate whether or not the exercise is correct to do.

Suggestions to assist prevent freezing.

Problems with freezing can make exercise challenging for those with PD. Some tips that may help embody:

Attempt to quickly elevate up the toes of each feet or swing each arms up to shoulder height. This could jolt the body into moving.

Count or speak out loud, saying ‘1, 2, three, 4’ or “step, step, step.” Speaking out loud creates a rhythm that sometimes gets the body going again.

Sing or hum an easy song you know well. This conjointly creates a rhythm for the body to follow.

Carry a little metronome to supply a relentless source of rhythm.

A word concerning posture.

Having PD can mean that you’ve got an inclination to lean forward at the hips and stand along with your shoulders rounded forward. This postural habit can be corrected. Search for programs that emphasize movements that open the chest and pull the shoulders back. Attempt to limit participation in classes that involve movements that build you round your back and shoulders forward.

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Fresh Fruit Can Help Beat Disease in the Workplace


Seattle, Washington (PRWEB) May 19, 2015

Do employers know that office fruit boosts engagement and retention by giving the brain the fuel it needs for top performance? Research shows fruits have a “halo” effect and help protect against sedentary lifestyle diseases like diabetes, heart disease and cancer according to Tom O’Connor, owner of Market Fresh Fruit in Seattle, Washington. No matter one’s job description, the benefits are equal when choosing to eat fresh and delicious fruit at work.

“Everyone is motivated to live a healthier lifestyle. Fruit at work is the opportunity to take that healthy step,” said O’Connor, author of the new book, “The Business Advantage for Fruit at Work: How to Boost Engagement and Retention” (Amazon Digital Services, Inc., 5.0 out of 5 stars, 2015, B00T8JL28I, $ 2.99). “The trigger can be an office-wide email that fresh morning fruit is now available. Or it can be staging the office fruit under a bright light, which can increase fruit consumption by 28%. It can also be the act of placing fruit baskets on top of office credenzas and/or file cabinets for easy dispersal.”

O’Connor’s book explains that “a greater number of sick days, increased health insurance costs and the high cost of fast food and processed snacks are just a few of the symptoms organizations face when they don’t have effective wellness programs.”

Tips from the book include:


Why offering fresh fruit at work is beneficial – A healthy workforce means more productive employees, especially with the large number of sick days, higher insurance costs, and the increasing rise of fast food and snack items.
How to move in the right direction – Employers can encourage healthier eating habits for workers in simple, cost-effective methods.
What does it mean to adopt good nutrition? – The theory of healthier eating is explained along with statistics on the effects of fresh fruit on the body.
Is it possible start a fruit delivery program at the office? The author provides several tips on how to get started on offering healthier food choices to workers at an affordable cost.

“If you have an employee population with a high BMI or high level of bad cholesterol, rather than doing exercise programs, you may want to talk to your employees about nutrition, diet and how to shop for vegetables and fruit, as basic as that is,” states Bruce Elliott, manager of compensation and benefits at the Society of Human Resources Management in Virginia, in a recent article on Entrepreneur.com. Elliot points out that more employers are offering wellness programs as an incentive for their workers.

Market Fresh Fruit is a Seattle, WA based company that delivers premium quality, local fruit to the workplace. Since 2010, Market Fresh Fruit is Seattle’s only taste-tested office fruit delivery service and is recommended by clients at Fisher Radio, Creative Circle Staffing, and Crane Aerospace. Market Fresh Fruit is owned by Tom O’Connor. Every week, their Fruit-at-Work program delivers just delicious fruit to over 8,000 Seattle area workers helping employers increase productivity and morale, while lowering employee benefit costs by offering workers a healthy snack over candy or empty white carbs like muffins or bagels.

For more information on Market Fresh Fruit and for a free fruit tasting, please contact Tom O’Connor at 206-304-2464. Also visit the website at marketfreshfruit.com for more information.







Vital Health, Inc. Outlines Essential Vitamins and Nutritional Supplements That Are Critical For Those With Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance


Orland Park, IL (PRWEB) March 15, 2015

“Celiac disease and gluten intolerance are autoimmune disorders that have a diverse range of manifestations throughout the body. Both of these disorders can affect any body tissue, organ and gland. Strict adherence to a gluten free diet is only the first step toward recovery. A second critical component is helping the body recover nutritionally, “began Barbara Griffin, NMD, CNC, Certified Gluten Practitioner and director of Vital Health, Inc.

Anyone living on a restricted diet has to compensate for the lack of specific nutrients. People with celiac disease and gluten intolerance face have an added challenge since nutritional malabsorption often precede their diagnosis. “The right nutritional supplements are a vital part of recovering and living a healthy gluten free life. For most people living with celiac disease and gluten intolerance there are a common group of vitamins and minerals they are deficient. Digestive enzymes and probiotics each play vital roles in the recovery process,“ Dr. Griffin remarked.

Vitamin D3:

For people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, vitamin D deficiency is present because it is absorbed in the region of the small intestines most commonly damaged by the disease. Vitamin D plays a critical role in modulating the immune system and reducing inflammation. Vitamin D deficiency in celiacs could be making leaky gut and inflammation worse. (1) Vitamin D deficiency is linked to: increased risk of Parkinson’s disease, autism and dementia; high blood pressure; bone disorders; and a variety of cancers such as breast, colon, ovarian, and esophagus.

Dr. Griffin recommends introducing ProVitality Vitamin D3, which is available in 2000, and 5000 IU’s along with testing levels through a blood test.

Digestive Enzymes:

Enzymes are proteins made by the bodies that break down specific types of foods into absorbable parts. Enzymes are a critical part of digestion and nutritional absorption. Deficiencies in digestive enzymes can contribute to sub-optimal nutrient absorption and are an important aspect of managing celiac disease and gluten intolerance. Digestive enzymes secretion is decreased in people with celiac disease due to the mucosal damage to the intestines.

When selecting a digestive enzyme look for one that is going to aide in the proper digestion of fats, proteins and carbohydrates. Ideally, enzymes are taken with each meal to help break down foods. This leads to fewer digestive symptoms such as gas, bloating, constipation or diarrhea, and also enhances nutrient absorption. Vital Essence My-Zymes are a complete enzyme blend and are chewable, making them a great option for children who would benefit from digestive enzymes.

Probiotics:

Probiotics are healthy bacteria that keep the micro flora (bacterial balance) of the digestive systems intact and prevent overgrowth of “bad” bacteria. The normal human GI tract contains 400+ types of probiotic bacteria.

Probiotics help keep bad bacteria under control which is essential for celiacs since they are prone to bacterial Dybiosis, meaning they do not have optimal levels of the beneficial bacteria and Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO), a condition where bad bacteria in the small intestines perpetuate nutrient malabsorption. Besides keeping bacteria under control, taking a multi-strain probiotic can reduce gluten-associated joint and muscle pain, fatigue and brain fog as well as control yeast gut colonization. (2) When selecting a probiotic, look for one that contains multiple strains and that has a higher bacteria count (CFU). Probiotics should be taken on an empty stomach. Probiotics are available in adult and children formulas.

Minerals

People with gluten intolerance, especially those diagnosed with celiac disease are often deficient in several key minerals. Due to inadequate pancreatic enzyme secretion, many celiacs are deficient in Vitamins A, E and K. Iron deficiency is the most common non-digestive symptom of celiac disease. (3) Iron absorption may normalize after one year or more on a gluten free diet.

Through the EVA screening, Dr. Griffin can check for nutritional deficiencies and identify what vitamins and supplements will help strengthen the body. If appropriate, Dr. Griffin will recommend blood work through SpectraCell Laboratory who specializes in nutritional testing.    

Vitamin B12 and Folic Acid

Folic acid is a B vitamin and like B12, the absorption of folic acid is diminished in celiac disease. This is often the case in those who are gluten intolerant. L-5methyltertrahydrofolate (L-5-MTHF) is the predominate form of folate. L-5-MTHF is a reduced, metabolically active form of folate that occurs naturally in foods and is the primary form of found in the blood and tissues. As a result, it is far more effective for people who have or prone to a folic acid deficiency. Dietary supplements MethylFolate and Methyl-B-12 Lozenges are available through the Vital Essence Supplement line offered by Vital Health, Inc.

Vital Health, Inc., addresses a whole body approach to health with the intention of facilitating well-being and optimal health. Before starting any supplement regimen Vital Health, Inc. recommends consulting your physician.

About Vital Health, Inc.:

At Vital Health, Inc. Dr. Griffin integrates a whole body approach with the intention of facilitating wellbeing and optimal health amongst her clients. Dr. Griffin’s specialties include: traditional naturopathy, nutrition, EAV Meridian Stress Assessment, Food Sensitivity Screening, Environmental Screenings, Iridology, SKASYS, Live Blood Cell Analysis as well as established integrative therapies such as Neuroemotional Therapy, Neuromodulation Technique, Cold Laser and clinician for Spectracell Laboratories, Inc. Vital Health, Inc. is located in the Orland Crossing office complex at 14225 S. 95th Ave., Suite 409, Orland Park, IL 60462 (708) 226-1131 http://www.vitalhealth.org

(1) http://scdlifestyle.com/2012/07/why-everyone-with-celiac-disease-needs-vitamin-d/

(2) http://www.celiac.com/articles/23617/1/Role-of-Probiotics-in-Improving-Gut-Health-in-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html

(3) http://drlisawatson.com/nutrient-deficiencies-celiac







Mercy Stride for Health to Discuss Pulmonary Disease – Javon Bea Mercy CEO


Janesville, WI (PRWEB) February 27, 2015

Javon Bea Mercy Health System President and CEO – The program, which is free and open to the public, is held the second Tuesday of each month, 8:15-9:30 am, at the Janesville Mall Food Court, 2500 Milton Ave. Monthly meetings include a heart-healthy continental breakfast, health screenings, door prize drawings, and an educational health-related presentation. Participants receive a free t-shirt when they sign up for membership in Stride for Health.

March 10: Using exercise to feel better with COPD

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often makes it difficult to breathe, which in turn may limit how active someone is and how much they may be able to exercise. Join Nancy Kemp, pulmonary rehabilitation coordinator at Mercy Cardiac Fitness Center, as she discusses how to use exercise to reduce shortness of breath and build muscle strength and endurance to help you stay more active for longer amounts of time.

For more information about the Stride for Health Mall Walking Program, call (608) 756-6100 or toll-free at (888) 39-MERCY.

trj







Related Exercise Program Press Releases

Workplace Lifestyle Intervention Program Improves Health, Reduces Diabetes and Heart Disease Risks


Pittsburgh, Pennslyvania (PRWEB) March 06, 2015

A healthy lifestyle intervention program administered at the workplace and developed by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health significantly reduces risk factors for diabetes and heart disease, according to a study reported in the March issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

The program was well-received by participants at Bayer Corp., who lost weight and increased the amount of physical activity they got each day, when compared with a control group in the study, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

“Health care expenditures associated with diabetes are spiraling, causing widespread concern, particularly for employers who worry about employee health and productivity,” said lead author M. Kaye Kramer, Dr.P.H., assistant professor in Pitt Public Health’s Department of Epidemiology and director of the school’s Diabetes Prevention Support Center. “This leads to an interest in workplace health promotion; however, there are very few evidence-based programs that actually demonstrate improvement in employee health. This study found that our program not only improves health, but also that employees really like it.”

This demonstration program is based on the U.S. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a national study that found people at risk for diabetes who lost a modest amount of weight through diet and exercise sharply reduced their chances of developing diabetes, outperforming people who took a diabetes drug instead.

Dr. Kramer and colleagues built on the DPP to create a group-based program that puts the findings into practice, called Group Lifestyle Balance™. The program is divided into 22 sessions over a one-year period and aimed at helping people make lifestyle changes to improve health. The sessions can be done as a group with a lifestyle coach or through a DVD coupled with brief weekly phone or, in certain cases, email consultations with the lifestyle coach. The option of the DVD with lifestyle coach support not only served as the main intervention option for those employees who traveled or who did not want to participate in the program in a group venue but also offered a valuable replacement for employees who chose to participate via group setting but had to miss an occasional session.

“Our Group Lifestyle Balance program has proven successful in diverse community settings, so we adapted it for the workplace since we found that there was a real need for effective programs that could fit into people’s work lives,” said senior author Andrea Kriska, Ph.D., professor in Pitt Public Health’s Department of Epidemiology and principal investigator of the study. “This current effort in the worksite shows clearly that a proven healthy lifestyle program, like the Group Lifestyle Balance program, offered to people where they work is not only feasible but effective in reducing risk factors for diabetes and heart disease for participating employees.”

A total of 89 employees at Bayer Corp. in Robinson Township, Pa., who were at risk for diabetes or heart disease were enrolled in the demonstration program in the fall of 2010 and followed for 18 months.

Over the course of a year, participants lost an average of 5 percent of their body weight (10 pounds), shrunk their waistlines by about 2 inches and brought down the levels of fat and sugar in their blood – all measures that reduce the risk of heart disease and diabetes. They also increased their physical activity by almost twofold.

Of the participants, 96 percent said they felt it was beneficial to offer the program at the worksite, and 99 percent said they would recommend it to their co-workers.

“The positive results that employees experienced from this lifestyle program speak to the benefits of personalized health programs in the workplace,” said Phil Franklin, M.D., U.S. corporate medical director, Bayer Corp. “I would like to congratulate the University of Pittsburgh researchers on the study.”

Additional authors on this research are Donald Molenaar, M.D., Veterans Health Administration in Minneapolis; Elizabeth Venditti, Ph.D., Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMC; and Vincent C. Arena, Ph.D., Rebecca Meehan, M.S., R.D., L.D.N., Rachel Miller, M.S., Karl Vanderwood, Ph.D., and Yvonne Eaglehouse, M.S., M.P.H., all of Pitt Public Health.

This research was funded by the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (R18 DK081323–04).

About the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health

The University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, founded in 1948 and now one of the top-ranked schools of public health in the United States, conducts research on public health and medical care that improves the lives of millions of people around the world. Pitt Public Health is a leader in devising new methods to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases, HIV/AIDS, cancer and other important public health problems. For more information about Pitt Public Health, visit the school’s Web site at http://www.publichealth.pitt.edu.







More Diet Press Releases

Forbes: Can Celery Protect the Brain against Inflammation?; The Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD) Reviews a Report


Rochester, NY (PRWEB) March 02, 2015

“Infected with the varicella zoster virus (VZV), which causes shingles? The Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD), which tested the formula of Novirin in two post-marketing clinical studies, recommends taking this natural antiviral supplement against the latent virus.” – Greg Bennett, CBCD

A plant compound called luteolin, which is found in celery, may reduce brain inflammation, and prevent neuro-degeneration (the progressive loss of structure or function of brain cells, including death of brain cells). (1) As Dr. Saebyeol and colleagues wrote in a study, “Luteolin, a flavonoid found in high concentrations in celery and green pepper, has been shown to reduce production of proinflammatory mediators….” (See PNAS, from 2008) (2) Dr. Saebyeol is from the Integrative Immunology and Behavior Program at the University of Illinois at Urbana – Champaign. “By inhibiting the action of inflammatory cytokines as earlier mentioned, luteolin can prevent the onset of degeneration in the brain.” (1)

This is important since some viruses are known to cause inflammation in the brain. One such virus is the varicella zoster virus (VZV), which causes both chickenpox and shingles. A Dr. Nagel wrote “recent studies have emerged which reveal that VZV infection of the cerebral arteries directly causes pathological vascular remodeling and stroke (VZV vasculopathy).” (See Current Neurology & Neuroscience Reports, published in advance of April 2015) (3) Dr. Nagel is from the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, Colorado. In other words, according to Dr. Nagel, the shingles virus directly attacks the arteries in the brain causing inflammation, which can result in brain cell death, and stroke.

Importantly, Dr. Nagel also wrote that “in the past few years, several large epidemiological studies in Taiwan, Denmark, and the U.K. demonstrated that zoster is a risk factor for stroke and that antiviral therapy may reduce this risk.” (3)

Taking an antiviral product against the shingles virus may be vitally important, since another study showed that “adults with zoster have a 30% increased risk of stroke within the following year. Although the exact incidence of stroke caused by VZV is unknown, more than 900,000 people in the United States will develop zoster annually.” (See The Journal of Immunology, from 2012) (4)

“We believe in a comprehensive, positive blend of natural and Western medicines. We believe the evidence points to the brain protecting properties of celery. We therefore recommend that VZV infected individuals make celery a part of their diet. We also recommend taking Novirin, which has a natural formula designed to target the latent VZV.” – Greg Bennett, CBCD

Click to learn more about the latent VZV.

The Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD) recommends that VZV infected individuals take Novirin. This natural antiviral supplement has a formula that was designed to help the immune system target the latent form of the Varicella Zoster Virus. The formula was also shown to be effective against herpes viruses in two separate post-marketing clinical studies that followed FDA guidelines.

The formula of Novirin was tested by Hanan Polansky and Edan Itzkovitz from the CBCD. The studies showed that the Novirin formula is effective against the herpes family of viruses. Varicella Zoster is a member of the herpes family. The clinical studies were published in the peer reviewed, medical journal Pharmacology & Pharmacy, the first, in a special edition on Advances in Antiviral Drugs. Study authors wrote that, “individuals infected with (herpes viruses) … reported a safe decrease in their symptoms following treatment with (the Novirin formula).” (5) The study authors also wrote that, “we observed a statistically significant decrease in the severity, duration, and frequency of symptoms.” (5)

Novirin can be ordered through the product website here: http://www.novirin.com.

Novirin is a natural antiviral dietary supplement. Its formula contains five natural ingredients: Selenium, Camellia Sinesis Extract, Quercetin, Cinnamomum Extract, and Licorice Extract. The first ingredient is a trace element, and the other four are plant extracts. Each ingredient and its dose was chosen through a scientific approach. Scientists at polyDNA, the company that invented and patented the formula, scanned thousands of scientific and medical papers published in various medical and scientific journals, and identified the safest and most effective natural ingredients against latent viruses.

To date, Novirin is the only natural antiviral product on the market with published clinical studies that support the product’s antiviral claims.

The CBCD believes that eating the right foods is just as important as taking a safe and effective, antiviral supplement like Novirin. “Flavonoids, plant polyphenolic compounds abundant in fruits and vegetables, exhibit a wide variety of biological effects, including … anti-inflammatory properties.” (2) The CBCD points out that the formula of Novirin also contains flavanoids such as quercetin.

The CDC notes that the varicella zoster virus (VZV), which is a herpes virus, causes both chickenpox and shingles. “After a person recovers from chickenpox, the virus stays dormant (inactive) in the body. For reasons that are not fully known, the virus can reactivate years later, causing shingles.” (6) Additionally, the CDC adds that “almost 1 out of every 3 people in the United States will develop shingles, also known as zoster or herpes zoster, in their lifetime. There are an estimated 1 million cases of shingles each year in this country. Anyone who has recovered from chickenpox may develop shingles; even children can get shingles. However the risk of shingles increases as you get older. About half of all cases occur in men and women 60 years old or older.” (See the CDC, last reviewed on May 1, 2014) (6)

Are there other treatments currently on the market, which target the Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV)?

Yes there are.

Zostavax is a vaccine that may reduce the risk of developing a shingles outbreak, and decrease the long-term pain from post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). In adults vaccinated at age 60 years or older, however, protection from the vaccine decreases within the first 5 years after vaccination. (6)

There are also antiviral drugs, such as Zovirax or Valtrex. However, these medications, when effective, only work to shorten the time of the shingles outbreak. They are ineffective against the latent VZV virus. (6)

Novirin is a natural remedy designed to help the immune system target latent herpes viruses, including the VZV. (5)

Interested individuals can view the studies published on the antiviral formula of Novirin here:http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=36101#.VNc8leaUf90 and http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=44234

Click to learn more about Novirin and shingles.

All orders of Novirin are completely confidential, and no information is shared or sold to any third party. Privacy is assured.

References:

(1)    Forbes.com – Cohen, J. “12 Best Foods To Boost Brain Power.” Published February 5, 2015. http://www.forbes.com/sites/jennifercohen/2015/02/05/12-best-foods-to-boost-brain-power/

(2)    Saebyeol Jang, Keith W. Kelley,* and Rodney W. Johnson* “Luteolin reduces IL-6 production in microglia by inhibiting JNK phosphorylation and activation of AP-1.” Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 May 27; 105(21): 7534–7539 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2396685/

(3)    Nagel MA1, Gilden D. “The relationship between herpes zoster and stroke.” Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep. 2015 Apr;15(4):534

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25712420

(4)    Stephanie James,1Alexander Choe,1Igor Traktinskiy,1Maria Nagel,1 and Donald Gilden “Varicella zoster virus can reactivate and infect cerebral adventital fibroblasts, suppressing Jak/STAT and causing stroke.” The Journal of Immunology, 2012, 188, 168.35

jimmunol.org/cgi/content/meeting_abstract/188/1_MeetingAbstracts/168.35

(5)    Polansky, H. Itzkovitz, E. Gene-Eden-VIR Is Antiviral: Results of a Post Marketing Clinical Study. Published in September 2013.

scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=3610

(6)    CDC.gov – “Shingles (Herpes Zoster)” – Prevention & Treatment. Last Reviewed on May 1, 2014.

cdc.gov/shingles/about/prevention-treatment.html







Forbes: New Dietary Guidelines on Cholesterol Suggest that 50 Years of Medical Advice Was Wrong; The Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD) Reviews the Report


Rochester, NY (PRWEB) February 17, 2015

Cholesterol in the diet or in the blood does not increase risk of heart disease, according to new research. In fact, shocking new cholesterol guidelines have been released by the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee based on this new data. There is a paradigm that has been accepted by the medical community regarding cholesterol since 1961. This standard stated that there is both “good” and “bad” cholesterol, and when an individual eats certain foods, it increases “bad” cholesterol in the blood, which in turn can lead to heart disease. This paradigm has been shattered by new research.

A summary of the committee’s December 2014 meeting says “Cholesterol is not considered a nutrient of concern for over consumption.” (See Harvard.edu, from February 12, 2015) (2) In other words, “You don’t need to worry about cholesterol in your food.” (2)

Professor Dan Rader said that “most of the cholesterol in our blood is not derived from our diets. Every cell in your body makes cholesterol. The old guidelines were based on a wrong assumption. We now know that cholesterol in the diet makes very little difference in terms of bad cholesterol in blood.” (1) He continued, saying that “the scandal here is that it’s taking so long for science to get incorporated into nutritional guidelines.” (1) Professor Rader is a professor of molecular medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

But, if cholesterol is not the cause of heart disease, what is?

According to the CBCD, the answer is latent viruses.

More than one study has linked viruses to heart disease. In fact, both the human papillomavirus (HPV) and the varicella zoster virus (VZV) have been linked to cardiovascular disease. For instance, “Women infected with the human papillomavirus, or HPV, are two to three times as likely as uninfected women to have had a heart attack or stroke, according to a report published in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology.” (See the New York Times, from October 24, 2011) (3).

Another study found that VZV “is an independent risk factor for vascular disease.” (See the journal Neurology, from January 21, 2014) (4).

The Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), which is more common than HPV or VZV, is also linked to heart disease. “Looking at blood samples from 299 heart patients, researchers at Ohio State University found that those who had suffered a heart attack were the most likely to have inflammatory proteins circulating in their blood compared to patients with less acute symptoms. And having more of one of these proteins in the blood was linked to the presence of antibodies that signal a latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation.” (See News-Medical.net, from January 23, 2013) (6).

CMV is another common virus, which is linked to heart problems. “Cytomegalovirus was found to be the most common specific finding in immunocompetent patients (people with healthy immune systems) with fatal myocarditis.” (See Clinical Infectious Diseases, from March 1, 2005) (7).

“The new dietary recommendations, based on new research that shows no association between cholesterol and heart disease, should be no surprise to those who read Dr. Hanan Polansky’s book entitled ‘Microcompetition with Foreign DNA and the Origin of Chronic Disease.’” – Greg Bennett, CBCD

According to Dr. Polansky, the cause of heart disease, and other major diseases, is a latent infection with common viruses, including HPV, VZV, EBV, and CMV. Moreover, this theory also explains why the HPV study reports that “about 20 percent of patients with heart disease lack obvious risk factors (such as levels of saturated fat in the bloodstream).” (3)

How do latent viruses cause heart disease?

According to Dr. Hanan Polansky’s theory, these viruses are genetic parasites. In high concentrations, they microcompete with the human genes, “starve” these genes, and force them to behave as if they’ve been mutated, that is, to behave as if they are broken.

The Theory of Microcompetition is far-reaching. It applies to many viruses, many genes, and many diseases.

The CBCD encourages doctors and other healthcare professionals to read Dr. Polansky’s book, which predicted that viruses would be the cause of most major diseases, including heart disease, more than ten years ago. “The concept of Microcompetition (or Starved Gene) will change our approach in the study of chronic diseases and will furthermore give scientists a higher level of understanding in biology.” – Dr. Marc Pouliot, PhD (See more reviews of Dr. Polansky’s book at: http://www.cbcd.net/reviews.htm )

For a free copy of Dr. Polansky’s book, and to learn more about the Theory of Microcompetition, visit http://www.cbcd.net and click on free download.

References:

(1) Faye, F. “Why Eggs And Other Cholesterol-Laden Foods Pose Little Or No Health Risk.” Published on February 12, 2015. Forbes.com.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/fayeflam/2015/02/12/why-eggs-and-other-cholesterol-laden-foods-pose-little-or-no-health-risk/

(2) Skerrett, Patrick J. “Panel suggests that dietary guidelines stop warning about cholesterol in food.” Published on February 12, 2015. Harvard Health

http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/panel-suggests-stop-warning-about-cholesterol-in-food-201502127713

(3) The New York Times – Troubles With Heart Are Linked to HPV. Published on October 24, 2011.

nytimes.com/2011/10/25/health/research/25theory.html?_r=0

(4) Herpes zoster as a risk factor for stroke and TIA: a retrospective cohort study in the UK. Published on January 21, 2014.

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24384645

(5) Polansky, H. Itzkovitz, E. Gene-Eden-VIR Is Antiviral: Results of a Post Marketing Clinical Study. Published in September 2013.

http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=36101#.U-s9ouOSz90

(6) News Medical – EBV reactivation can increase risk of heart disease.

Published on January 23, 2013

news-medical.net/news/20130123/EBV-reactivation-can-increase-risk-of-heart-disease.aspx

(7) Cytomegalovirus infection of the heart is common in patients with fatal myocarditis. Published on March 1, 2005.

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15714413







Agein Corporation Responds to Findings: Prolonged Sitting Leads to Death and Disease


Boston, MA (PRWEB) January 30, 2015

Agein.com, the Internet’s premier anti-aging web site focusing on anti-aging tips, news, and advice from some of the foremost experts in the industry, is weighing in on a recent study that found that prolonged periods of sitting can lead to death and disease. Agein.com also announces the top strategies to help reduce the amount of time spent sitting.

“It isn’t uncommon for people to spend the better part of their day sitting. Many go from the car to the office to back in the car to the dinner table, then spend the rest of the evening watching TV on the couch,” says Dr. Kevin J. McLaughlin, Agein.com’s anti-aging and health and wellness specialist. “In fact, it’s believed that an average person literally spends half their day sitting. Unfortunately, new data suggest a sedentary lifestyle could be killing us.”

Researchers in Toronto analyzed data pooled from 41 international studies and found that prolonged periods of sedentary behavior were associated with a 15% to 20% higher risk of death from heart disease, diabetes, and cancer and as much as a 90% increased risk of developing diabetes. (Source: Ubelacker, S., “Sitting for too long can kill you, even if you exercise: study,” CBC web site, January 19, 2015; http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/sitting-for-too-long-can-kill-you-even-if-you-exercise-study-1.2918678.)

Dr. McLaughlin explains that the data are adjusted for the effects of regular exercise. While regular exercise, a healthy diet, and a daily personal care regimen are important for maintaining a healthy lifestyle, engaging in 30 to 60 minutes of exercise does not mean individuals can relax for the rest of the day.

“Staying healthy is about balance. In order to really lower the risk of disease and premature death, people need to incorporate more anti-aging fitness into their schedule and reduce the amount of time they spend sitting down,” he adds. “In addition to exercising, people need to make a conscious effort to reduce the amount of time they sit in a 12-hour day by at least two to three hours.”

“There are a number of easy strategies everyone can incorporate into their day to help keep them moving. For instance, if someone works at a desk all day, they should make a point of taking a short two-minute walk once an hour, and if they work in an office building, they should skip the elevator and take the stairs. And when watching TV, people should use commercial breaks to walk around,” Dr. McLaughlin concludes. “It doesn’t take a lot to effort to make a big lifestyle change; everyone just needs to make a concerted effort to move around, eat healthy, and get a good night’s sleep.”

About Agein.com: The company’s goal is to inspire and coach readers to adapt an anti-aging lifestyle that suits their individual needs. Its anti-aging experts offer education on diet, fitness, and skin care and how all of these areas affect the way people look and feel. Agein.com also provides information on all of the latest advances in anti-aging research, the hottest anti-aging trends in Hollywood, and beauty tips. Agein.com will equip readers with all of the tools needed to make the right anti-aging lifestyle choices. To learn more about Agein Corporation, visit the company’s web site at http://www.Agein.com.