Archive for Consumer

Consumer Health Digest Official YouTube Channel: A Reliable Source of Health Information


Nagpur, India (PRWEB) May 26, 2015

Surging to over 674,923 of monthly traffic as of April 2015, one of the leading online health and wellness sites, Consumer Health Digest (CHD), continues to make an impact to the online community. It has proven to be a reliable source of health information for people to read articles, watch videos, ask questions and interact with the online community and field experts.

The launch of the official Consumer Health Digest YouTube Channel has offered a much larger-scale online information hub about health, weight loss, fitness, skin care and beauty. CHD’s You Tube channel subscribers now have access to useful and interesting videos about various health conditions, diet, skin care, fitness tips and men’s & women’s health.

Through videos, you can also learn about effective solutions to many health conditions. Feel better and look better with the best work out routines, and discover the tips and tricks to lose weight the healthy way. And best of all, watch exclusive 40-week pregnancy videos that will guide expecting moms every step of the way throughout their pregnancy.

Based on the YouTube Analytics report from April 12, 2015 to May 18, 2015, Consumer Health Digest channel has been viewed 353,490 times and has recorded a total of 556,675 (estimated) minutes watched. Its audience engagement continues to gain momentum and traction in the United States, United Kingdom, Philippines, Canada and India during this period. The report also suggests that the channel’s top traffic sources are derived from YouTube suggested video (54%) and YouTube search (30%). It currently has 5,248 subscribers and growing.

Consumer Health Digest Channel’s top three most watched videos are about pregnancy, such as:

1. 28 Weeks Pregnant: Your Baby’s Movement During 28 Week Pregnancy

2. 7 Weeks Pregnant: What Is Currently Happening with the Fetus?

3. 23 Weeks Pregnant: See the Movements of Your Baby This Week

CHD YouTube Channel’s pregnancy videos take you on a fascinating visual journey through the various stages of pregnancy, week-by-week. It features the step-by-step guide and detailed information for expecting moms and dads, including ultrasound records, baby’s development, baby’s movements and clear explanations on what to expect during a particular stage of pregnancy.

You can subscribe to Consumer Health Digest’s official YouTube channel to watch more videos and receive updates.







Consumer Reports: Is Your Coffeemaker Tracking You?


Yonkers, NY (PRWEB) April 30, 2015

Thanks to the growing constellation of smart devices collectively know as the Internet of Things, common everyday devices can offer an appealing level of convenience quite literally by collecting data on the habits of users. But a new investigation by Consumer Reports revealed that the convenience can come with a trade-off: These devices can also send a steady flood of personal data to corporate servers, where it’s saved and shared, and can be used in ways consumers can’t control.

The report, “In the Privacy of Your Own Home,” is available in the June 2015 issue of Consumer Reports and at ConsumerReports.org.

Though websites and smartphone apps have long been following users’ activities, Internet-connected devices – ranging from baby monitors to door locks – now gather data from some of the most private spaces of our lives, Consumer Reports found. And without proper safeguards, all of the data that different devices and sites have collected can be combined, then exploited by marketers or stolen by hackers.

“Consumers may or may not worry about being monitored by their appliances – but they need to know it’s happening,” said Glenn Derene, electronics editor at Consumer Reports. “We think that manufacturers of smart devices should tell consumers in easy-to-understand language about the types of information being collected by those devices and how that information could potentially be shared, sold, and used. And they should also give consumers options to control the collection and use of their data.”

An analysis by Consumer Reports in cooperation with Georgetown Law’s Center on Privacy & Technology showed that many privacy polices for connected devices are vague, confusing, and sweeping. When the effects of some of these policies are revealed, consumers may be shocked. For example, in February, the media reported that LG and Samsung smart TVs allowed those companies to transmit household conversations to third parties. But the privacy policies didn’t clearly explain when the TVs were recording or where the voice data was going – nor promise that the data wouldn’t be used for other purposes in the future.

“Do you want the disappointing readout on your smart scale to translate into ads for diet plans on your smart phone? Maybe you do, maybe you don’t – but the choice ought to be yours,” said Derene. Although some of the companies that sell connected devices currently promise not to use the collected data for advertising and promotion, that could change at any time in the absence of regulation.”

Consumers who don’t like the idea of being tracked by their devices may think they have only two options: Avoid technology altogether or simply surrender to the surveillance. But for most smart products, there are strategies that can at least restrict how much information gets collected. Here are six ways to reduce exposure:

1.    Password-protect anything that collects personal information. Many smart devices are managed through Internet-based accounts. Some have pass codes you can enter on the device as well. Use both.

2.    Read the privacy policy. We know they’re often long and indecipherable. But if you want an indication of the kinds of information your device is tracking, that’s where you’ll find it.

3.    Find the “off” toggle in the settings menu on your smart device. Often, features that track you are given a line-item on-off toggle. On smart TVs, for example, you can switch off voice control and “interactive” functionality.

4.    Don’t leave connected devices on when you’re not using them. Certain Internet-enabled devices are hooked to the Internet 24/7 by necessity, but a connected baby monitor doesn’t need to be streaming video from junior’s crib when your baby is in your arms.

5.    Install security updates. Device makers need to get serious about automatically pushing out security updates. But consumers would be wise to periodically check the manufacturer’s website to see whether their device has a patch, and update, or new firmware.

6.    Take it offline. If Wi-Fi or cellular connectivity in a product doesn’t offer a tangible benefit to you, buy the non-connected version.

For more information on the Internet of Things, connected devices and privacy, the full article is available at ConsumerReports.org and in the June 2015 issue of Consumer Reports magazine.

About Consumer Reports

Consumer Reports is the world’s largest and most trusted nonprofit, consumer organization driving marketplace change to improve the lives and amplify the voices of consumers. Founded in 1936 Consumer Reports has achieved substantial gains for consumers on food and product safety, financial reform, health and other issues. The organization has advanced important policies to cut hospital-acquired infections, prohibit predatory lending practices and combat dangerous toxins in food. Consumer Reports independent testing and rating of thousands of products and services is made possible by its member-supported 50 plus labs, state-of-the-art auto test center and consumer research center. Consumers Union, a division of Consumer Reports, works for pro-consumer laws and regulations in Washington, D.C., the states, and in the marketplace. With more than eight million subscribers to its flagship magazine, website and other publications Consumer Reports accepts no advertising, payment or other support from the companies whose products it evaluates.

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Related Diet Press Releases

Consumer Credit Bureau Disputes Processes Need to be Re-Examined According to New Bridgeforce Report


Chadds Ford, PA (PRWEB) May 19, 2015

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau recently announced that large consumer reporting agencies are now required to submit accuracy reports that will detail consumer dispute statistics by furnisher relative to their peers. This regulatory focus coupled with increased media attention, should serve as an indicator that consumer reporting agencies and data furnishers need to transform the way in which credit bureau disputes are addressed and resolved. It is too often that disputes are handled as a back office operation with little to no direct customer interaction the risk for confusion and the potential for a negative customer experience.

In the new white paper titled “Reinventing the Credit Bureau Disputes Customer Experience,” Bridgeforce provides the framework for a customer facing approach with an emphasis on two-way communication. According to Bridgeforce, “the key to effectively handling credit bureau disputes is empowering the customer throughout the process–they should be able to understand where the dispute is within the resolution process and provide additional information and value-added feedback.” This new model would ultimately lead to a reduction in dispute volume while capitalizing on an opportunity to provide a positive customer experience during a period of uncertainty.

“In the credit reporting ecosystem, disputes are a sign of risk,” said Michelle Macartney, Managing Director of US Practice. “Data furnishers are in a position to utilize the customer facing approach to turn risk into an opportunity by better serving their customers and differentiating themselves from their peers.”

To download the paper, go to the Bridgeforce knowledge library for free access. Click here to sign up.

About Bridgeforce

Bridgeforce is a specialized multi-national consulting firm serving a variety of clients involved in almost all aspects of the consumer and small business lending and payments space. Over 75 percent of Bridgeforce consultants come directly from client-side leadership positions across multiple parts of the credit lifecycle. Combined with subject matter expertise in operations, technology, strategy and regulatory issues, Bridgeforce has the knowledge and experience to make the hard choices in developing and implementing best-fit solutions that are both achievable and lower the risks of execution to ensure sustainability. Bridgeforce success can be attributed to a culture fostering innovation and evolving experienced-based best practices recognized within the industry. For more information, visit http://www.bridgeforce.com.







Samsung, LG, Apple Models Top Latest Consumer Reports Smart Phone Ratings

Yonkers, NY (PRWEB) December 17, 2014

Android smart phones dominate the latest Consumer Reports Ratings, with several models from Samsung’s flagship Galaxy line, LG, and HTC landing at or near the top. Apple’s latest handset, the iPhone 6, was also a top-scoring model.

The Samsung Galaxy S 5, the Galaxy S 5 Active, and the Galaxy S 5 Sport all performed well enough in CR’s comprehensive tests to land spots at the top of the Ratings. Each received high marks for attributes like display quality, camera image quality, battery life, and ease of use. In all, six of the top ten highest-scoring handsets in CR’s smart phone Ratings are Samsung models.

The LG G3, Apple iPhone 6, and HTC One (M8) are also high-performing smart phones that rank near the top of CR’s Ratings. All of the models in the top ten are within 5 points of each other in overall score, meaning that most people would likely be very satisfied with any of those options.

“If you’re in the market for a new smart phone, you can expect a larger, sharper display that’s easier to read; better performance; and even better battery life,” said Mike Gikas, Senior Electronics Editor for Consumer Reports. “And while Samsung has many highly-rated phones in our Ratings, competing models from Apple, LG, HTC, Sony, and Motorola are also compelling.”

The full Consumer Reports smart phone Ratings, as well as a guide to choosing the right smart phone, can be found online at ConsumerReports.org.

Battery life is improving with each generation of smart phones – a fact borne out by CR’s exhaustive tests. Still, CR’s experts have the following tips to help consumers get the most out of their smart phone batteries:


Dim the display. A superbright, always-on display can eat up your battery, so put it on a diet. Lower it, or set it to Auto.
Turn things off. Your handset maintains contact with the carrier’s cell tower, and when that link weakens, the phone works harder to try to maintain it. If you’re spending extended time in an area with no service at all, turn the phone off or set it to airplane mode.
Give it a boost. Event the most stringent conservation practices won’t make a battery last forever. Carrying a spare battery is an excellent backup plan. Don’t have a removable battery? Consider a charging case from companies such as Mophie and PhoneSuit.
Buy a battery champ. If you’re shopping for a new phone, stack the odds in your favor by choosing one that has demonstrated staying power in Consumer Reports’ tests. Look for models in the Ratings that have ‘very good’ or ‘excellent’ scores for battery life.

Consumer Reports is the world’s largest independent product-testing organization. Using its more than 50 labs, auto test center, and survey research center, the nonprofit rates thousands of products and services annually. Founded in 1936, Consumer Reports has over 8 million subscribers to its magazine, website and other publications. Its advocacy division, Consumers Union, works for health reform, food and product safety, financial reform, and other consumer issues in Washington, D.C., the states, and in the marketplace.